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James W Kinnear

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BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
Texaco Inc. stockholders, meeting for the first time since the oil giant began a post-bankruptcy restructuring, were told today that the company has bounced back with a vengeance. "Since last year, we have gone from a period of promise to a period of heightened performance," said James W. Kinnear, Texaco's president and chief executive officer. Kinnear and Texaco Chairman Alfred C. DeCrane Jr. told the annual meeting that the company is ready to reclaim its place as an industry leader because of the restructuring.
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BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texaco's Kinnear Announces Retirement: The White Plains, N.Y.-based oil company announced that company President and Chief Executive James Kinnear will retire on April 1 and turn his duties as chief executive over to Chairman Alfred DeCrane. Texaco directors are expected to name a new company president at a later date. Kinnear steps down after 38 years upon reaching the mandatory retirement age of 65. He was elected to Texaco's board in 1977, rose to president of the Texaco U.S.A.
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BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Texaco Inc., apparently nearing the end of its bankruptcy, reported a fourth-quarter loss of $4.76 billion Friday. The huge loss, which was expected, is thought to be the second largest on record. The deficit, slightly smaller than AT&T's loss of $4.87 billion in the final quarter of 1983, reflected almost $5 billion in special one-time charges related to the bankruptcy and settlement of its long legal fight with Pennzoil.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | From Times wire services
Texaco Inc. stockholders, meeting for the first time since the oil giant began a post-bankruptcy restructuring, were told today that the company has bounced back with a vengeance. "Since last year, we have gone from a period of promise to a period of heightened performance," said James W. Kinnear, Texaco's president and chief executive officer. Kinnear and Texaco Chairman Alfred C. DeCrane Jr. told the annual meeting that the company is ready to reclaim its place as an industry leader because of the restructuring.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Texaco's latest talks with shareholder Carl C. Icahn were motivated in part by the fact that uncertainty over Icahn's intentions have made it harder for Texaco to sell the $5 billion in assets it has on the block, President and Chief Executive James W. Kinnear said Tuesday. Kinnear refused to divulge details of the negotiations, which the company disclosed Monday night.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
The unexpectedly fat price fetched by Texaco's Canadian operations was the catalyst for last weekend's peace settlement between Texaco and corporate raider Carl C. Icahn, the oil company's chief executive said Tuesday. James W. Kinnear said it was the sale of most of Texaco Canada Inc. for nearly $4 billion, when Icahn and others thought it would command perhaps $2.7 billion, that enabled the company to sweeten its special dividend payout and other terms to Icahn's satisfaction.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1988 | SCOT PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Texaco's management claimed a decisive victory Friday in its fight against corporate raider Carl C. Icahn's efforts to take control of the company in the biggest proxy battle in corporate history. If true, Texaco's management has won a reprieve to continue restructuring the company in the wake of its recent bankruptcy proceedings. It also likely would mean an end to Icahn's efforts to oust management and acquire the nation's third-largest oil company.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texaco's Kinnear Announces Retirement: The White Plains, N.Y.-based oil company announced that company President and Chief Executive James Kinnear will retire on April 1 and turn his duties as chief executive over to Chairman Alfred DeCrane. Texaco directors are expected to name a new company president at a later date. Kinnear steps down after 38 years upon reaching the mandatory retirement age of 65. He was elected to Texaco's board in 1977, rose to president of the Texaco U.S.A.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1990 | Associated Press
Texaco Inc., one of the nation's oil giants, announced today a $1-million program to plant 50,000 trees in three cities this spring to kick off private sector involvement in President Bush's "America the Beautiful" program. Texaco President James W. Kinnear said the tree money will be shared in Denver, Houston and New Orleans, where the company has extensive operations.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1989 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
The unexpectedly fat price fetched by Texaco's Canadian operations was the catalyst for last weekend's peace settlement between Texaco and corporate raider Carl C. Icahn, the oil company's chief executive said Tuesday. James W. Kinnear said it was the sale of most of Texaco Canada Inc. for nearly $4 billion, when Icahn and others thought it would command perhaps $2.7 billion, that enabled the company to sweeten its special dividend payout and other terms to Icahn's satisfaction.
BUSINESS
June 18, 1988 | SCOT PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
Texaco's management claimed a decisive victory Friday in its fight against corporate raider Carl C. Icahn's efforts to take control of the company in the biggest proxy battle in corporate history. If true, Texaco's management has won a reprieve to continue restructuring the company in the wake of its recent bankruptcy proceedings. It also likely would mean an end to Icahn's efforts to oust management and acquire the nation's third-largest oil company.
BUSINESS
May 18, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Texaco's latest talks with shareholder Carl C. Icahn were motivated in part by the fact that uncertainty over Icahn's intentions have made it harder for Texaco to sell the $5 billion in assets it has on the block, President and Chief Executive James W. Kinnear said Tuesday. Kinnear refused to divulge details of the negotiations, which the company disclosed Monday night.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1988 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
Texaco Inc., apparently nearing the end of its bankruptcy, reported a fourth-quarter loss of $4.76 billion Friday. The huge loss, which was expected, is thought to be the second largest on record. The deficit, slightly smaller than AT&T's loss of $4.87 billion in the final quarter of 1983, reflected almost $5 billion in special one-time charges related to the bankruptcy and settlement of its long legal fight with Pennzoil.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texaco's Capital Spending to Be Flat: Texaco Inc.'s capital spending plans for 1992 will be in line with 1991's $3.6 billion, President and Chief Executive James W. Kinnear told a gathering of security analysts at the company's executive offices in Harrison, N.Y. The announcement follows word that other oil companies plan to cut capital budgets and spending because of continuing weakness in the economy.
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