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James W Ziglar

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NEWS
August 1, 2001 | Associated Press
Senators approved the nomination of former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms James Ziglar on Tuesday as the new Immigration and Naturalization Service commissioner. Ziglar got a standing ovation from the senators after they approved his nomination by voice vote. "On behalf of the entire Senate, we wish Jim Ziglar well in his new role and new responsibilities," said Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), whose sentiments were echoed by Minority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.).
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NEWS
August 1, 2001 | Associated Press
Senators approved the nomination of former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms James Ziglar on Tuesday as the new Immigration and Naturalization Service commissioner. Ziglar got a standing ovation from the senators after they approved his nomination by voice vote. "On behalf of the entire Senate, we wish Jim Ziglar well in his new role and new responsibilities," said Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), whose sentiments were echoed by Minority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.).
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NEWS
October 4, 1986 | Associated Press
President Reagan will nominate James W. Ziglar, a Washington investment banker, as assistant secretary of the Interior for water and science, the White House announced Friday. Ziglar would succeed Robert N. Broadbent.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2002 | From Associated Press
WASHINGTON -- The nation's top immigration official said Wednesday he is willing to consider the economic impact on the travel industry of an administration proposal to limit how long foreigners can visit the United States. James W. Ziglar, commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, agreed in a House committee hearing to meet with industry members to address their concerns, as long as Bush administration officials approve and the law allows it.
NEWS
October 2, 1987 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
The 85-year-old federal Bureau of Reclamation, facing the end of the era in which big dams are being built in the West, announced Thursday that it will focus on water cleanup and conservation in a reorganization that could cut its 8,000-member staff in half by 1998. "The bureau largely has accomplished the job for which Congress created it in 1902--namely, to reclaim the arid West," said James W. Ziglar, assistant secretary of the Interior for water and science.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2001
Among immigration specialists, the initial reaction to President Bush's nomination of James W. Ziglar, the Senate's sergeant-at-arms, to head the Immigration and Naturalization Service was skepticism. How could someone who knew little about immigration head the troubled agency in charge of it? Earlier this month at Ziglar's confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, the reaction was quite different.
NEWS
July 19, 2001 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush's choice to head the Immigration and Naturalization Service sailed through a Senate confirmation hearing Wednesday, even as he declined to reveal his views on a possible White House policy shift that would grant amnesty to millions of Mexicans living in the United States illegally. Appearing before an unusually cordial Senate Judiciary subcommittee, James W.
NATIONAL
June 26, 2012 | By Paloma Esquivel
PHOENIX -- Soon after the Supreme Court handed down its ruling on Arizona's landmark immigration law, Gov. Jan Brewer said she believed the controversial “show me your papers” provision of the law could immediately go into effect . That doesn't seem to be the case. Legal experts cautioned Tuesday that the provision cannot be implemented until an injunction imposed by a lower court is lifted. “It's going to happen, and it's going to happen reasonably quickly,” said Dan Pochoda, legal director at the ACLU of Arizona.
NEWS
March 1, 2002 | SEAN GILL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tearful Honduran teenager, describing his harrowing immigration to America and his mistreatment after his arrival, testified before a Senate panel Thursday on the need for U.S. officials to help juveniles who come to this country unaccompanied by an adult. Edwin Munoz, 15, said he was abandoned by his parents at age 7 in Honduras and then beaten by the cousin in whose care he was left.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a broad crackdown on illegal immigration following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, U.S. officials are targeting as the priority for deportation several thousand Middle Eastern men who have previously been ordered to leave the country.
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