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James Waterston

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NEWS
January 23, 2003 | Anne Valdespino, Times Staff Writer
Ask James Waterston about looking remarkably like his famous father and he assumes you're talking about breaking into the business when you've got a successful parent. "I thought you meant the advantages of being," he lowers his voice, " 'Son of Sam.' " Yes, he sometimes gets called by his father's first name when being ushered into an audition, and oh, yeah, Variety got it wrong when it said he would be starring in the upcoming Merchant Ivory film "Le Divorce" -- his dad got that part.
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NEWS
January 23, 2003 | Anne Valdespino, Times Staff Writer
Ask James Waterston about looking remarkably like his famous father and he assumes you're talking about breaking into the business when you've got a successful parent. "I thought you meant the advantages of being," he lowers his voice, " 'Son of Sam.' " Yes, he sometimes gets called by his father's first name when being ushered into an audition, and oh, yeah, Variety got it wrong when it said he would be starring in the upcoming Merchant Ivory film "Le Divorce" -- his dad got that part.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SAN DIEGO--He's needy and nerdy. She's brainy and picky. Their first date is a dud. But through an extended dream sequence, we see what their next five decades would be like if they wooed and wed and suffered together all those common dilemmas of money, sex, dual careers, children, family, separation and death. Such is the easy-access premise of "An Infinite Ache," which opened Saturday at the Cassius Carter Centre Stage at the Old Globe Theatres complex.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since the publication of Catherine Marshall's acclaimed novel "Christy" more than 30 years ago, and the near-cult following of a short-lived 1994-95 CBS series, fans have been wondering who the plucky heroine will marry: the sweet, young preacher David Grantland or the handsome but emotionally complex widower Dr. Neil MacNeil? Christy finally makes her decision at the conclusion of a two-part movie, "Christy, Choices of the Heart," which can be seen Sunday and Monday on family-friendly Pax.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2000 | CONNIE WETHINGTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Based on Catherine Marshall's best-selling novel and continuing where the 1994-95 CBS television series left off, "Christy: The Movie" follows the early 20th century experiences of Christy Huddleston, an idealistic 19-year-old who has left the privileged city life she has known for a mission house teaching position in an impoverished Appalachian community known as Cutter Gap. The year is 1912, and the first road into town is under construction.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
When the touring version of "Proof" played the Wilshire Theatre last summer, it left some of us wondering, "Is that all there is?" That response was set up by the fact that David Auburn's play won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize and a Tony Award. Where was the proof that this relatively mild-mannered play, about a daughter's attempt to step out of her father's shadow, deserved such rare acclaim?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 1 - 7, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES America's Next Top Model One of the models has a fear of clowns in this new episode. 9 p.m. KTLA Luther Detective John Luther (Idris Alba) must clear his name after being accused of crimes he didn't commit while working to stop a vigilante killer in the conclusion of four-episode season.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 1989 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"The Dead Poets Society," (citywide) is set in 1959, in an East Coast prep school, which the Australian director Peter Weir turns into an evil ice palace. The grounds are green and immaculate, the forests are deep and dark, the school a network of echoing hallways, grandiose chapels and tiny, fusty classrooms. It's a place of crystalline but dangerous beauty, against which Weir's star, Robin Williams, blazes like a poetry-spewing comet. The film, one of the best American movies of a so-far undistinguished year, keeps trying to expand its barriers, to become an allegory of the dark side of adolescence and family, a romantic fable about the destruction of beauty in a conformist world.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2006 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
"In matters of grave importance," Oscar Wilde tells us, "style, not sincerity, is the important thing." Yet when it comes to making us laugh, sincerity is every bit as necessary as style. Peter Hall's Theatre Royal Bath production of "The Importance of Being Earnest," which opened Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre, serves Wilde's witticisms on a silver platter garnished with plenty of ham.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's Alternative Screen presents at 7:30 tonight Rodney Evans' "The Unveiling," an entertaining documentary on three exotic dancers: Michele Watley, Eldad Sahar and Dixie Evans. Sahar and Watley are expert dancers with perfect bodies who are consummately skilled at knowing how to tease their audiences, who tend to be gays and lesbians, respectively.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Daniel Sullivan's powerful staging of "Julius Caesar" at the Old Globe's outdoor amphitheater is set near the end of the 21st century. The world has been "destroyed by religious wars and economic collapse," Sullivan's program note says. "A series of nation states riven by civil war and internecine tribal fighting covers the globe." Prewar Iraq, Chechnya and Bosnia-Herzegovina are models, he writes. These comparisons don't quite ring true.
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