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James Watt

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1996
Your paper reported that former Interior Department Secretary James Watt was able to sidestep 18 felony charges of perjury and of making false statements (March 13). He was merely sentenced to probation for withholding documents from a federal grand jury investigating a Housing and Urban Development scandal. In sentencing Watt, U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth said: "It seems to me that what you did there is out of character. It was an aberration from your life. You have had a life of great integrity and it's a shame to see what happened here."
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OPINION
May 25, 2003
Environmental Protection Agency chief Christie Whitman has announced she is leaving the Bush administration (May 22). When executives get fired in the private sector, they are "leaving to pursue other interests." When they leave the White House family, they "leave to spend more time with their own families." It is well known that Whitman has been unhappy ever since President Bush rejected the Kyoto treaty on global warming. Whitman, a moderate Republican from New Jersey, has been silenced at nearly every turn as corporate greed triumphed over environmental safeguards.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | DOUG KENDALL, Doug Kendall is the founder and director of Community Rights Counsel, a nonprofit law firm
Although she's earned such colorful epithets as "James Watt in a skirt," amusing labels can't fully capture why Gale Norton, newly nominated as secretary of Interior, is unfit to be entrusted with our national parks, monuments and other public treasures. As her record as a lawyer espousing the rights of polluters and corporate interests shows, Norton's only qualifications for the job of Interior secretary should be disqualifications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2002 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Jay D. Hair, former head of the National Wildlife Federation, credited with transforming the group into the nation's largest grass-roots environmental organization and a powerful lobbying force, has died. He was 56. Hair died Friday in his home in suburban Seattle of bone-marrow cancer. During his tenure, from 1981 to 1995, Hair changed the organization from something of a conservative sportsmen's club to a 6-million-member group of activists focused on environmental reform.
NEWS
September 11, 1985 | MAURA DOLAN, Times Staff Writer
For Secretary of the Interior Donald P. Hodel, who sees himself as a consensus builder open to outside views, the honeymoon in office is over. Since taking over the Interior Department last February, Hodel and his staff have worked to bring into the governmental process groups excluded by one of his predecessors, the controversial James G. Watt. Staff members visited the offices of environmentalists and returned their phone calls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1991 | JULIA PRODIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It has been seven years since James Watt saddled up and headed West, driven out of Washington by enraged environmentalists and by his own maladroit tongue. But he could hold that tongue just so long. And now, after watching what he says are the abuses of a rogue environmental movement, he's sounding off--in newspaper columns, at cattlemen's meetings and political banquets. "Somebody's got to scream back," he said. "After 11 years of reflection. . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1987
And the Reagan hit parade plays on. Interior Secretary Hodel--cut from the same embarrassing cloth as his predecessor, James Watt--indicated with his recent "Ray-Ban Plan" that he needs a refresher course in high school Biology 101. Wearing sunglasses and skin creams to combat the deadly results of a uselessly thin ozone layer can be likened to wearing nose clips for breathing smog; drinking polluted water through a straw or strapping on a...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1988
Bush should be ashamed of himself for parading around the country trying to pass himself off as a friend of the environment. Where was George during the Reagan Administration's acid reign of terror on environmental protection? Where was George when the Clean Water Act was vetoed? Where was George when reckless offshore oil drilling was proposed? Where was George when James Watt was hired? Come on, George. If you're going to try to take credit for the perceived economic success of the Reagan Administration, you'll have to take the blame for its obvious failings as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1989
In his condemnation of the "Grand Old Parasites" who bilked the coffers of HUD during the Reagan years, Martin Schram (Op-Ed Page, June 28) overlooks an important motivation for such blatant influence peddling. What better way to destroy the already teetering institutional structure of Great Society warhorses like HUD than to unleash large-scale corruption upon its very foundations. For those who participated in the scam, this was nearly a can't-lose operation. Even if James Watt and a few of his cronies serve time in one of those country club white-collar prisons (unlikely)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1986
Your editorial misses the mark. Pendleton was chosen because his philosophy is congruent with the Reagan Administration. He has worked very earnestly to carry out his responsibilities in dismantling the civil rights programs enacted over a 20-year period. Don't expect the Reagan Administration to "set aside" Pendleton and his policies. He has gone out on a limb doing his job just as Ann Gorsuch Burford did at the Environmental Protection Agency and James Watt did at the Department of the Interior in their roles as point men for Reagan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | DOUG KENDALL, Doug Kendall is the founder and director of Community Rights Counsel, a nonprofit law firm
Although she's earned such colorful epithets as "James Watt in a skirt," amusing labels can't fully capture why Gale Norton, newly nominated as secretary of Interior, is unfit to be entrusted with our national parks, monuments and other public treasures. As her record as a lawyer espousing the rights of polluters and corporate interests shows, Norton's only qualifications for the job of Interior secretary should be disqualifications.
NEWS
January 7, 2001 | TERENCE MONMANEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nothing about electricity deregulation in California is simple, starting with the name. After all, how "deregulated" is an industry if companies have to beg state officials for permission to raise prices? Certainly the policy's many advocates did not anticipate the current mess and its expensive ironies--namely, that investor-owned utilities, which pushed for deregulation just a few years ago, are now threatening bankruptcy because of it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1996
Your paper reported that former Interior Department Secretary James Watt was able to sidestep 18 felony charges of perjury and of making false statements (March 13). He was merely sentenced to probation for withholding documents from a federal grand jury investigating a Housing and Urban Development scandal. In sentencing Watt, U.S. District Judge Royce C. Lamberth said: "It seems to me that what you did there is out of character. It was an aberration from your life. You have had a life of great integrity and it's a shame to see what happened here."
NEWS
March 13, 1996 | SHERI L. WASSENAAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodging a possible jail sentence, James Watt, former Interior Department secretary in the Reagan administration, was sentenced Tuesday to five years' probation, a $5,000 fine and 500 hours of community service for withholding documents from a federal grand jury investigating a Housing and Urban Development Department scandal.
OPINION
January 7, 1996 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. He can be reached via e-mail at 76327.1675@compuserve.com
James G. Watt looked so happy the other day flashing a confident grin and the thumbs-up sign as he emerged from a federal court in Washington. He hasn't had so much fun since the old days when he was secretary of the Interior opening the entire U.S. coastline to offshore drilling and clearcutting ancient forests. Why shouldn't he be smiling? Watt copped a plea to a single misdemeanor charge of attempting to mislead a federal grand jury and thereby avoided trial on 18 felony charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1991 | JULIA PRODIS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It has been seven years since James Watt saddled up and headed West, driven out of Washington by enraged environmentalists and by his own maladroit tongue. But he could hold that tongue just so long. And now, after watching what he says are the abuses of a rogue environmental movement, he's sounding off--in newspaper columns, at cattlemen's meetings and political banquets. "Somebody's got to scream back," he said. "After 11 years of reflection. . .
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | From United Press International
Cy Jamison, a House subcommittee aide and former assistant to James G. Watt, was nominated Wednesday to head the Bureau of Land Management, which manages 300 million acres of federal lands in the West and Alaska. Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan Jr.
OPINION
May 25, 2003
Environmental Protection Agency chief Christie Whitman has announced she is leaving the Bush administration (May 22). When executives get fired in the private sector, they are "leaving to pursue other interests." When they leave the White House family, they "leave to spend more time with their own families." It is well known that Whitman has been unhappy ever since President Bush rejected the Kyoto treaty on global warming. Whitman, a moderate Republican from New Jersey, has been silenced at nearly every turn as corporate greed triumphed over environmental safeguards.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Senate Democrats, joined by a handful of Republicans and widely supported by environmentalists, sent President Bush's nomination of James Cason to head the U.S. Forest Service back to the White House and a quiet death Friday. Two days after the Administration had put the matter at the top of the list of business that it wanted completed before congressional adjournment for the year, Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1989
In his condemnation of the "Grand Old Parasites" who bilked the coffers of HUD during the Reagan years, Martin Schram (Op-Ed Page, June 28) overlooks an important motivation for such blatant influence peddling. What better way to destroy the already teetering institutional structure of Great Society warhorses like HUD than to unleash large-scale corruption upon its very foundations. For those who participated in the scam, this was nearly a can't-lose operation. Even if James Watt and a few of his cronies serve time in one of those country club white-collar prisons (unlikely)
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