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James Webb

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SCIENCE
March 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Braving the rain, scientists and engineers have rolled out a full scale model of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope at South by Southwest. The public will get an up-close look at the telescope, which will look deep into the cosmos for starlight from the most distant galaxies to learn about the origins of the universe. "We call ourselves a time machine," said Scott Willoughby, James Webb program manager at Northrop Grumman, where the telescope is being built. "We can look and actually find, further than Hubble did, the first light that came out after the big bang.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
March 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Braving the rain, scientists and engineers have rolled out a full scale model of the NASA James Webb Space Telescope at South by Southwest. The public will get an up-close look at the telescope, which will look deep into the cosmos for starlight from the most distant galaxies to learn about the origins of the universe. "We call ourselves a time machine," said Scott Willoughby, James Webb program manager at Northrop Grumman, where the telescope is being built. "We can look and actually find, further than Hubble did, the first light that came out after the big bang.
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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | From the Washington Post
James E. Webb, the hard-charging and immensely capable administrator who was head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from 1961 to 1968, has died at 85. Webb died Thursday at Georgetown University Hospital after a heart attack. He had also suffered from Parkinson's disease. Webb had a long career in public service and private industry. During the Truman Administration, he served as director of the Budget Bureau and as an undersecretary of state.
SCIENCE
January 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Astronomers may have to brace for a much humbler astrophysics mission following the planned launch of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018, a NASA official told a ballroom full of astronomers Tuesday. Under current budget constraints and with future funding uncertain, such a mission might have to be small enough to cost $1 billion or less, NASA astrophysics division director Paul Hertz told astronomers gathered for a town hall at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Long Beach.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | United Press International
Former Marine Corps officer James H. Webb was publicly sworn in Friday as the nation's 66th secretary of the Navy in a ceremony at the U.S. Naval Academy. Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger administered the oath to Webb, who is the second academy graduate to reach the Navy's highest post. "In James Webb we have a tested leader and a true American hero," Weinberger told a crowd of 7,000--including 4,000 midshipmen--at the outdoor ceremony.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
James Webb has long dreamed of making a movie based on his 1978 novel, "Fields of Fire," a gritty portrayal of Marines in combat during the Vietnam War. But while the former Navy secretary has won support for his film project from the Marine Corps and even the current communist government of Vietnam, the U.S. Defense Department has turned thumbs down.
SCIENCE
January 8, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Astronomers may have to brace for a much humbler astrophysics mission following the planned launch of the James Webb Space Telescope in 2018, a NASA official told a ballroom full of astronomers Tuesday. Under current budget constraints and with future funding uncertain, such a mission might have to be small enough to cost $1 billion or less, NASA astrophysics division director Paul Hertz told astronomers gathered for a town hall at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Long Beach.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Lost Soldiers" is a strong and unusual novel. On its face, it is a standard tale of intrigue, adventure and mystery. James Webb has written a well-plotted story about Americans and Vietnamese in Vietnam more than a quarter-century after the war's end. You want to know what will happen next: You will not be disappointed. Yet, in retrospect, the plot fades away, and what the reader remembers most is the deep pull of affection the Americans feel for Vietnam and the Vietnamese.
OPINION
January 20, 2010 | By Harry K. Wexler
In its Jan. 17 editorial, "A poor prison plan for California" and several other articles, The Times has detailed some of the long-standing problems in the American criminal justice system. As a member of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's prison reform strike team in 2007 and '08, I had a firsthand look at how the system is rife with inequities and in many ways dysfunctional. Most experts would agree that the system generally fails on half its mission -- rehabilitating offenders -- and is only partially successful in the other half of preserving public safety.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Saturn has its famous rings and Jupiter is the granddaddy of the solar system, but no planet has entranced earthlings quite like Mars. Humans have launched 40 spacecraft to the Red Planet, lured by the prospect that life might once have existed in what is now dry rocks and sand. The latest machine to make the journey isNASA'sMars Science Laboratory, a hulking, souped-up lab-on-wheels that will plunge toward the Martian surface next week. But even as excitement builds, some wonder: Is Mars exploration a good investment?
OPINION
January 20, 2010 | By Harry K. Wexler
In its Jan. 17 editorial, "A poor prison plan for California" and several other articles, The Times has detailed some of the long-standing problems in the American criminal justice system. As a member of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's prison reform strike team in 2007 and '08, I had a firsthand look at how the system is rife with inequities and in many ways dysfunctional. Most experts would agree that the system generally fails on half its mission -- rehabilitating offenders -- and is only partially successful in the other half of preserving public safety.
NEWS
September 7, 2001 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Lost Soldiers" is a strong and unusual novel. On its face, it is a standard tale of intrigue, adventure and mystery. James Webb has written a well-plotted story about Americans and Vietnamese in Vietnam more than a quarter-century after the war's end. You want to know what will happen next: You will not be disappointed. Yet, in retrospect, the plot fades away, and what the reader remembers most is the deep pull of affection the Americans feel for Vietnam and the Vietnamese.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS
James Webb has long dreamed of making a movie based on his 1978 novel, "Fields of Fire," a gritty portrayal of Marines in combat during the Vietnam War. But while the former Navy secretary has won support for his film project from the Marine Corps and even the current communist government of Vietnam, the U.S. Defense Department has turned thumbs down.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | From the Washington Post
James E. Webb, the hard-charging and immensely capable administrator who was head of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from 1961 to 1968, has died at 85. Webb died Thursday at Georgetown University Hospital after a heart attack. He had also suffered from Parkinson's disease. Webb had a long career in public service and private industry. During the Truman Administration, he served as director of the Budget Bureau and as an undersecretary of state.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | United Press International
Former Marine Corps officer James H. Webb was publicly sworn in Friday as the nation's 66th secretary of the Navy in a ceremony at the U.S. Naval Academy. Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger administered the oath to Webb, who is the second academy graduate to reach the Navy's highest post. "In James Webb we have a tested leader and a true American hero," Weinberger told a crowd of 7,000--including 4,000 midshipmen--at the outdoor ceremony.
NEWS
January 14, 2011 | From Times wire reports
The astrological calendar is all wrong. That public comment from a Minnesota astronomy professor set the Internet aflame this week. People might think they're a Pisces (compassionate, imaginative), but often they're really an Aquarius (witty, clever) -- at least based on an exact reading of the Earth's orbit. Or maybe, if you were born between Nov. 29 and Dec. 17, you're actually a strange new zodiac sign: Ophiuchus, the serpent holder. But who wants to admit to being that snake-guy sign on a first date?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1987 | Associated Press
President Reagan announced Thursday that he will nominate Denver attorney Stephen M. Duncan to succeed James H. Webb Jr. as assistant secretary of defense for reserve affairs. Webb recently was named secretary of the Navy.
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