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MAGAZINE
December 11, 1994 | Mark Gladstone and Paul Jacobs, Times reporters Mark Gladstone and Paul Jacobs cover government and politics from the Sacramento bureau
At the prosecution table in a wood-paneled federal courtroom in Sacramento sits FBI agent James J. Wedick Jr. His suit and tie are as drab as any plainclothes cop's, but there is something that sets him apart: the long brown hair, flecked with gray; the salt-and-pepper beard; the half-glasses that give him an almost scholarly air.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- When it comes to a federal corruption case, there are few things more important than an affidavit, according to former FBI agent James Wedick. The affidavit, a sworn statement made in support of an investigation, can be "90% of your case," he said. California's Capitol was rocked on Wednesday when such a document was disclosed by Al Jazeera cable network, detailing bribery allegations against Sen. Ronald Calderon (D-Montebello). His office was searched in June, but the nature of the investigation had remained a mystery until this week.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- When it comes to a federal corruption case, there are few things more important than an affidavit, according to former FBI agent James Wedick. The affidavit, a sworn statement made in support of an investigation, can be "90% of your case," he said. California's Capitol was rocked on Wednesday when such a document was disclosed by Al Jazeera cable network, detailing bribery allegations against Sen. Ronald Calderon (D-Montebello). His office was searched in June, but the nature of the investigation had remained a mystery until this week.
MAGAZINE
June 18, 2006
It is one of the strengths of our system that an insider such as James Wedick can reach deep into his own moral convictions and stand up to challenge a leadership that is bent on punishing Muslim Americans ("The Agent Who Might Have Saved Hamid Hayat," by Mark Arax, May 28). The Lodi trial and the details of the Hayat case provide plenty of evidence that the plebian father and son team charged with "terrorism" were indeed hapless, uneducated and not very sophisticated. They might have had a different perspective on things, but so does the Ku Klux Klan membership.
MAGAZINE
June 18, 2006
It is one of the strengths of our system that an insider such as James Wedick can reach deep into his own moral convictions and stand up to challenge a leadership that is bent on punishing Muslim Americans ("The Agent Who Might Have Saved Hamid Hayat," by Mark Arax, May 28). The Lodi trial and the details of the Hayat case provide plenty of evidence that the plebian father and son team charged with "terrorism" were indeed hapless, uneducated and not very sophisticated. They might have had a different perspective on things, but so does the Ku Klux Klan membership.
MAGAZINE
May 28, 2006 | Mark Arax
Before the wins and losses are tallied up and the war on terror goes down in the books as either wisdom or folly, it might be recalled what took place this spring on the 13th floor of the federal courthouse in Sacramento. There, in a perfectly dignified room, in front of prosecutors, defense attorneys and judge, a tall, gaunt man named James Wedick Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 2006 | Rone Tempest, Times Staff Writer
Federal prosecutors expressed confidence Friday that the unanimous conviction of a 23-year-old Lodi man on terrorism charges would stand despite a juror's contention that she was bullied into a guilty verdict by other jurors. "It is a long-settled principle of law that second thoughts about a verdict by a juror are not enough to overturn that verdict," said McGregor Scott, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of California.
MAGAZINE
January 29, 1995
What a worthy report on FBI shenanigans in our state capital ("The G-Man, the Shrimp Scam and Sacramento's Big Sting," by Mark Gladstone and Paul Jacobs, Dec. 11)! It's clear that the taxpayer's crime-fighting dollar is being shortchanged when FBI Special Agent James J. Wedick Jr. opts out of fighting dangerous street crime and/or armed bank robbers so that he can instead dream up schemes to entrap public officials. It's sure a lot safer for Wedick than fighting crime. We know that our public officials are not all choirboys and choirgirls, and we don't need an $80,000-a-year agent- provocateur to tell us that.
NEWS
August 2, 1995 | PETER H. KING
The vacant lot sits on the very edge of town. On one side it is bordered by an almond orchard. On the opposite side are tract homes and more tract homes--the front of a rolling wave of municipal sprawl known as Greater Fresno. The lot is covered with weeds and fill dirt. A large sign beckons: "For Sale. Subdivision Land. 152 Lots." No buyers come, for this is a vacant lot with complications, a lot with a story to tell. It's owned by a Fresno man named Bill Tatham Jr.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
A federal jury Thursday acquitted one member of a group accused of plotting to blow up Chicago's Sears Tower and declared themselves deadlocked in deciding the fate of the six other defendants in the case of the so-called Liberty City Seven. The case has divided legal experts over how far the government should go in building a case against terrorism suspects.
MAGAZINE
May 28, 2006 | Mark Arax
Before the wins and losses are tallied up and the war on terror goes down in the books as either wisdom or folly, it might be recalled what took place this spring on the 13th floor of the federal courthouse in Sacramento. There, in a perfectly dignified room, in front of prosecutors, defense attorneys and judge, a tall, gaunt man named James Wedick Jr.
MAGAZINE
December 11, 1994 | Mark Gladstone and Paul Jacobs, Times reporters Mark Gladstone and Paul Jacobs cover government and politics from the Sacramento bureau
At the prosecution table in a wood-paneled federal courtroom in Sacramento sits FBI agent James J. Wedick Jr. His suit and tie are as drab as any plainclothes cop's, but there is something that sets him apart: the long brown hair, flecked with gray; the salt-and-pepper beard; the half-glasses that give him an almost scholarly air.
NEWS
December 10, 1999 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing estimates of fraud reaching 70% in parts of Medi-Cal, Gov. Gray Davis vowed Thursday to clean up the program with a major expansion of investigative forces and new laws to beef up the legal tools needed to combat health care crime. "For too many years the state looked the other way. We're not going to do that anymore," he said in an interview.
NEWS
November 21, 1993 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even before the jury reaches a verdict in the case of former state Sen. Paul B. Carpenter and powerhouse lobbyist Clayton R. Jackson, their six-week corruption trial has cast an unflattering spotlight on several other public figures. The testimony of more than two dozen witnesses and transcripts of undercover tapes have raised questions about the manipulation of campaign contributions, lobbying by special interests and officeholders' ethics.
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