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James Whale

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1997 | Jon Burlingame, Jon Burlingame is writer based in Los Angeles
The setting: an ancient stone fortress, dank, grim and forbidding, incongruously filled with electrical devices and complex machinery. A determined, solitary figure, dressed in surgeon's garb, pulls on a pair of rubber gloves and prepares to begin his work. Scalpel in hand, he carefully slices open the forehead of his patient, a man lying on a table--suspended by chains from the high ceiling--and encircled from head to foot by a dozen metal rings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Susan King
Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Wolf Man and the Invisible Man are among the many creatures invading the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in October. The academy is hosting "Universal's Legacy of Horror,"  a monthlong series in celebration of the studio's 100th birthday. The thrills begin Oct. 2 with the newly restored 1935 James Whale classic "The Bride of Frankenstein," starring Boris Karloff as the Monster, as well as Colin Clive, Dwight Frye, Ernest Thesiger and Elsa Lanchester as Mary Shelley and the Bride.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | STEVEN SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With flawless timing, bolts of lightning flashed and thunder rumbled in the distance as Sir Ian McKellen and Brendan Fraser sat in McKellen's Hollywood Hills home on a gray September morning, to summon the spirits of "Gods and Monsters." A hit at Sundance this year, the film, opening Wednesday, takes a fictionalized look at the final days of James Whale (McKellen), the real-life director who in 1931 created perhaps the most indelible icon of movie horror, "Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2000 | BILL DESOWITZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The idea of an invisible man may have a long history in Western culture dating back to Plato, but it was H.G. Wells who put him over the top and James Whale who made him immortal. In "The Invisible Man" (adapted from the Wells novel in 1933), director Whale captures the primal power of the legend with sardonic humor and theatrical flair.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Warning! The Monster Demands a Mate!" So screamed the ads 60 years ago for "The Bride of Frankenstein," which the Alex Film Society will screen Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. According to Randy Carter, the society's vice president, "Bride" is that rarest of horror movies--a good film as well as a first-rate shocker. "It's the first follow-up movie that was as good or better than the original," he says. Fans will see a rare archival print of the movie loaned by the Library of Congress.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997
I'm mystified how Brendan Fraser could make the statement "No one really knows exactly what happened to James Whale" ("Frankie's Director Goes to Hollywood," by Jon Burlingame, Nov. 2). Whale's death was documented as a suicide in my book "James Whale," which was published in 1982. In fact, Christopher Bram acknowledged his debt to my book in his novel "Father of Frankenstein," which is the source for the film in which Fraser appears. Bram credits me with having "cleared up a major mystery" in publishing Whale's handwritten suicide note.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | Steven Smith
On May 29, 1957, the lifeless body of director James Whale was found in the pool of his Pacific Palisades home--and for more than two decades, fans of the cinematic father of "Frankenstein" wondered: Was Whale the victim of foul play? It took 25 years, and the tenacity of biographer James Curtis, to publicly reveal the truth behind the filmmaker's death. In fact, Whale had left a suicide note, citing failing health for the action he was about to take.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2012 | By Susan King
Frankenstein's monster, Dracula, the Wolf Man and the Invisible Man are among the many creatures invading the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences' Samuel Goldwyn Theatre in October. The academy is hosting "Universal's Legacy of Horror,"  a monthlong series in celebration of the studio's 100th birthday. The thrills begin Oct. 2 with the newly restored 1935 James Whale classic "The Bride of Frankenstein," starring Boris Karloff as the Monster, as well as Colin Clive, Dwight Frye, Ernest Thesiger and Elsa Lanchester as Mary Shelley and the Bride.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Eddie Murphy-Martin Lawrence buddy comedy "Life" may be Universal's high-profile DVD release this week, but the studio's collector's edition of the 1935 horror classic "The Bride of Frankenstein" is far more entertaining. "Bride of Frankenstein" ($30) is director James Whale's sequel to his 1931 gem, "Frankenstein." As wonderful as the original was, this is one of the few times in cinema history when the sequel is even better.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | STEVEN SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With flawless timing, bolts of lightning flashed and thunder rumbled in the distance as Sir Ian McKellen and Brendan Fraser sat in McKellen's Hollywood Hills home on a gray September morning, to summon the spirits of "Gods and Monsters." A hit at Sundance this year, the film, opening Wednesday, takes a fictionalized look at the final days of James Whale (McKellen), the real-life director who in 1931 created perhaps the most indelible icon of movie horror, "Frankenstein."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | Steven Smith
On May 29, 1957, the lifeless body of director James Whale was found in the pool of his Pacific Palisades home--and for more than two decades, fans of the cinematic father of "Frankenstein" wondered: Was Whale the victim of foul play? It took 25 years, and the tenacity of biographer James Curtis, to publicly reveal the truth behind the filmmaker's death. In fact, Whale had left a suicide note, citing failing health for the action he was about to take.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With this summer's "Godzilla" a proven disappointment despite its $134-million gross, the legacy of James Whale, who essentially invented the modern monster movie, seems smarter (if less heeded) than ever. Whale, the Hollywood director of "Frankenstein" and "The Bride of Frankenstein" in the 1930s, "invested the central character of the genre--the monster, if you will--with human qualities," Whale's biographer, James Curtis, says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1997 | STEVEN SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the 101-year-old shipwreck survivor she movingly plays in James Cameron's epic "Titanic," Gloria Stuart has stories to tell. The 87-year-old actress may not have faced icebergs in the Atlantic, but she's weathered formidable directors like John Ford and James Whale, defied Darryl Zanuck and Universal's Carl Laemmle Jr., fought to launch the Screen Actors Guild and lobbed butter at Humphrey Bogart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1997
I'm mystified how Brendan Fraser could make the statement "No one really knows exactly what happened to James Whale" ("Frankie's Director Goes to Hollywood," by Jon Burlingame, Nov. 2). Whale's death was documented as a suicide in my book "James Whale," which was published in 1982. In fact, Christopher Bram acknowledged his debt to my book in his novel "Father of Frankenstein," which is the source for the film in which Fraser appears. Bram credits me with having "cleared up a major mystery" in publishing Whale's handwritten suicide note.
BOOKS
April 30, 1995 | James Wilcox, James Wilcox's novels include " Modern Baptists. "
Don't be fooled by the somewhat lurid, lumbering title of Christopher Bram's fifth novel. "Father of Frankenstein" is actually a subtle, psychologically shrewd portrait of an artist's last days, highlighted by masterful touches of the most entertaining wit and suspense. The title's father refers to filmmaker James Whale, the director not only of "Frankenstein" and "Bride of Frankenstein," but also of the little-known anti-war film "Journey's End" and the superb 1936 adaptation of "Show Boat."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1997 | STEVEN SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the 101-year-old shipwreck survivor she movingly plays in James Cameron's epic "Titanic," Gloria Stuart has stories to tell. The 87-year-old actress may not have faced icebergs in the Atlantic, but she's weathered formidable directors like John Ford and James Whale, defied Darryl Zanuck and Universal's Carl Laemmle Jr., fought to launch the Screen Actors Guild and lobbed butter at Humphrey Bogart.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1997 | Jon Burlingame, Jon Burlingame is writer based in Los Angeles
The setting: an ancient stone fortress, dank, grim and forbidding, incongruously filled with electrical devices and complex machinery. A determined, solitary figure, dressed in surgeon's garb, pulls on a pair of rubber gloves and prepares to begin his work. Scalpel in hand, he carefully slices open the forehead of his patient, a man lying on a table--suspended by chains from the high ceiling--and encircled from head to foot by a dozen metal rings.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Warning! The Monster Demands a Mate!" So screamed the ads 60 years ago for "The Bride of Frankenstein," which the Alex Film Society will screen Saturday at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. According to Randy Carter, the society's vice president, "Bride" is that rarest of horror movies--a good film as well as a first-rate shocker. "It's the first follow-up movie that was as good or better than the original," he says. Fans will see a rare archival print of the movie loaned by the Library of Congress.
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