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James Whitmore

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2009
A public memorial for actor James Whitmore, who died Feb. 6 at 87, will be held March 28 at 1 p.m. at the Directors Guild of America, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. The gathering will be "a celebration of an actor's life, with special emphasis on the craft of acting," said Whitmore's son Steve. Instead of flowers, donations may be made to the Peterborough Players, 55 Hadley Road, Peterborough, N.H., 03458.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Several homes once owned by celebrities are worth noting this week: In Malibu, Robert Redford 's former beach house is listed for $15 million. Set on exclusive Broad Beach, the midcentury house has been upgraded with modern amenities. Including the master suite with a fireplace and balcony, there are five bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms in the home's 5,329 square feet of living space. The Oscar-winning director and actor owned the property from 1986 to 2001, public records show. Sandra Miller of Engel & Volkers in Santa Monica and Pamela Moran of Prudential California Realty are the listing agents.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Several homes once owned by celebrities are worth noting this week: In Malibu, Robert Redford 's former beach house is listed for $15 million. Set on exclusive Broad Beach, the midcentury house has been upgraded with modern amenities. Including the master suite with a fireplace and balcony, there are five bedrooms and 4.5 bathrooms in the home's 5,329 square feet of living space. The Oscar-winning director and actor owned the property from 1986 to 2001, public records show. Sandra Miller of Engel & Volkers in Santa Monica and Pamela Moran of Prudential California Realty are the listing agents.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Prolific character actor James Whitmore appeared in countless films ("The Asphalt Jungle," "The Shawshank Redemption") and TV series ("The Twilight Zone") in his six -decade career, earning Oscar nominations for 1949's "Battleground" and 1975's "Give 'Em Hell, Harry!" and winning an Emmy in 2000 for his guest appearance on ABC's "The Practice. " But according to his son, James Whitmore Jr., an actor and TV director ("NCIS," "The Good Wife") in his own right, theater was his father's true passion right up until he died in 2009 at age 87 of lung cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
James Whitmore, the veteran Tony- and Emmy-winning actor who brought American icons Will Rogers, Harry Truman and Theodore Roosevelt to life in one-man shows, died Friday. He was 87. Whitmore died of lung cancer at his home in Malibu, said his son, Steve. He was diagnosed with the disease a week before Thanksgiving.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Whitmore, the marvelous star of such one-man shows as "Will Rogers' USA" and "Give 'Em Hell, Harry," has carved himself another juicy part in "Dirt," which had its West Coast premiere at the Old Globe Theatre last week. Unfortunately, Whitmore's portrayal of an aging, ailing farmer in this three-character piece is the only one worth watching.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Donna Raymond, head of docents at Will Rogers State Historic Park, the moment that actor James Whitmore transforms himself into folk hero Rogers is a stunning theatrical display. Raymond has a practiced eye, having spent hundreds of hours showing park visitors around the Pacific Palisades house preserved just as the joke-spinning philosopher left it when he died in an Alaska plane crash in 1935. "He walks out on stage and turns his back to the audience," she says of Whitmore.
OPINION
March 7, 2003
Re "Frankie Hewitt, 71; Force Behind Revival of Ford's Theatre," obituary, March 3, on the woman responsible for the return to vigorous life of Ford's Theatre in Washington (where President Lincoln was assassinated): Frankie defied the darkness that had settled on the theater for 100 years and turned on the light of life. She transformed a house of shame into a place of music, drama and joy. Mr. Lincoln would applaud. Hail and farewell, Frankie -- your monument lives on! James Whitmore Malibu
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000
Mary Hunter Wolf was, indeed, a very unique woman (obituary, Nov. 24). I was one of the fortunate few among the 1,700 GIs Mary helped launch into a theatrical career when she established the Professional Training Program of the American Theater Wing in New York after World War II. Included in our classes were such soon-to-be-recognized names as Lee Marvin, James Whitmore and Martin Balsam. Jean Stapleton and Eileen Heckart were among the many volunteer actresses Mary invited to help develop our skills as actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man in his 20s approached James Whitmore not long ago and asked, "Aren't you the man who said, 'I never met a man I didn't like?' " "Well, I did say it. I did indeed." Whitmore laughed as he recounted the incident. "I've been saying it for 26 years. That's a lifetime. Will Rogers is a part of me now." He was talking about "Will Rogers' U.S.A.," his perennial one-man show in which he portrays the legendary cowboy, rope artist and pricker of political and social pomposity.
NATIONAL
July 3, 2009 | Geraldine Baum
Times sure have changed for Manhattan's super-rich. It used to be when James Whitmore, hair colorist to the pampered chic, hadn't seen a client for awhile it was because she'd extended a trip abroad or was caught up redecorating a second home. But now -- with America's economy imploding and Wall Street bankers the prime suspects -- there's no telling why a woman-of-means goes AWOL from her beauty regimen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2009
A public memorial for actor James Whitmore, who died Feb. 6 at 87, will be held March 28 at 1 p.m. at the Directors Guild of America, 7920 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. The gathering will be "a celebration of an actor's life, with special emphasis on the craft of acting," said Whitmore's son Steve. Instead of flowers, donations may be made to the Peterborough Players, 55 Hadley Road, Peterborough, N.H., 03458.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2009 | Dennis McLellan
James Whitmore, the veteran Tony- and Emmy-winning actor who brought American icons Will Rogers, Harry Truman and Theodore Roosevelt to life in one-man shows, died Friday. He was 87. Whitmore died of lung cancer at his home in Malibu, said his son, Steve. He was diagnosed with the disease a week before Thanksgiving.
OPINION
April 24, 2003
If the U.S. has nothing to hide or fear regarding the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, then it is imperative for us to allow U.N. weapons inspectors to continue their work as soon as possible. This is not about punitive measures toward the United Nations or countries that did not support the war effort. It's about the U.S. giving validity to its claim and eliminating the doubt that will arise, both inside and outside of our country, if we allow only a "private screening."
OPINION
March 7, 2003
Re "Frankie Hewitt, 71; Force Behind Revival of Ford's Theatre," obituary, March 3, on the woman responsible for the return to vigorous life of Ford's Theatre in Washington (where President Lincoln was assassinated): Frankie defied the darkness that had settled on the theater for 100 years and turned on the light of life. She transformed a house of shame into a place of music, drama and joy. Mr. Lincoln would applaud. Hail and farewell, Frankie -- your monument lives on! James Whitmore Malibu
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2000
Mary Hunter Wolf was, indeed, a very unique woman (obituary, Nov. 24). I was one of the fortunate few among the 1,700 GIs Mary helped launch into a theatrical career when she established the Professional Training Program of the American Theater Wing in New York after World War II. Included in our classes were such soon-to-be-recognized names as Lee Marvin, James Whitmore and Martin Balsam. Jean Stapleton and Eileen Heckart were among the many volunteer actresses Mary invited to help develop our skills as actors.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Whitmore, the marvelous star of such one-man shows as "Will Rogers' USA" and "Give 'Em Hell, Harry" has carved himself another juicy part in "Dirt," which had its West Coast premiere at the Old Globe Theatre on Thursday. Unfortunately, Whitmore's portrayal of an aging, ailing farmer in this three-character piece is the only one worth watching.
OPINION
April 24, 2003
If the U.S. has nothing to hide or fear regarding the existence of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, then it is imperative for us to allow U.N. weapons inspectors to continue their work as soon as possible. This is not about punitive measures toward the United Nations or countries that did not support the war effort. It's about the U.S. giving validity to its claim and eliminating the doubt that will arise, both inside and outside of our country, if we allow only a "private screening."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1996 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Donna Raymond, head of docents at Will Rogers State Historic Park, the moment that actor James Whitmore transforms himself into folk hero Rogers is a stunning theatrical display. Raymond has a practiced eye, having spent hundreds of hours showing park visitors around the Pacific Palisades house preserved just as the joke-spinning philosopher left it when he died in an Alaska plane crash in 1935. "He walks out on stage and turns his back to the audience," she says of Whitmore.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1995 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A man in his 20s approached James Whitmore not long ago and asked, "Aren't you the man who said, 'I never met a man I didn't like?' " "Well, I did say it. I did indeed." Whitmore laughed as he recounted the incident. "I've been saying it for 26 years. That's a lifetime. Will Rogers is a part of me now." He was talking about "Will Rogers' U.S.A.," his perennial one-man show in which he portrays the legendary cowboy, rope artist and pricker of political and social pomposity.
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