Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Williams
IN THE NEWS

James Williams

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist James Williams may be one of the highest-profile pianists on the New York scene, but he had a hard time gaining respect from a Southern California crowd Tuesday at Spaghettini. Don't blame Williams. His smashing performance with bassist Richard Reid showed why he is one of the top-ranking keyboardists of the generation of jazz musicians who are too mature to be classified as young lions, yet not nearly old enough for living-legend status.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2009 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
James William Kilgore, the last captured member of the Symbionese Liberation Army, was released on parole Sunday morning from a Northern California prison. Kilgore, 61, was arrested in Cape Town, South Africa, in 2002 after almost three decades on the run. He was one of five SLA members who pleaded guilty to second-degree murder in the 1975 death of Myrna Opsahl, a 42-year-old mother of four who was killed by a shotgun blast after she arrived at a suburban Sacramento bank.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Williams, 53, a jazz pianist who recorded with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers and in his own ensembles, died Tuesday of liver cancer in New York City. A native of Memphis, Tenn., Williams began playing in his hometown at age 13, concentrating initially on gospel and soul. After graduating from Memphis State University, he moved to Boston to teach at the Berklee College of Music. He was a member of Blakey's band from 1977 to 1981 and wrote several compositions.
SPORTS
January 22, 2009 | Associated Press
LeBron James had 34 points and 14 assists and the Cleveland Cavaliers held off the Portland Trail Blazers for a 104-98 victory on Wednesday night. Mo Williams scored a season-high 33 points, including a career-high six three-point baskets for the Cavaliers, who made 11 of 19 three-pointers. Cleveland had lost four of its last five on the road, including a 105-88 loss to the Lakers on Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1986 | ZAN STEWART
The James Williams quintet did just about everything right during its performance Wednesday at At My Place. The New York-based pianist's group played invigorating, contemporary mainstream jazz, most of it original, with passion, articulation and clarity, and while much of the music heard was complicated, it was also melodic and accessible.
SPORTS
December 6, 1995 | Associated Press
Ernest Givins signed with Jacksonville intent on reviving his career and garnering votes for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Instead, he didn't even make it through a season with the expansion team. Givins, the leading receiver in Houston Oiler history, was released by the Jaguars, the team he signed with as a free agent on June 2. Also cut was linebacker James Williams.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1995 | ZAN STEWART
This prime example of straight-ahead jazz exalts sumptuous melody and hard-driving rhythm. Here, creativity and entertainment are partners, not enemies. This a truly cross-generational session, sparked by trumpeter- fluegelhornist Clark Terry, 74, a master who--after 50 years in jazz--continues to let loose unique, walloping sound and vibrant improvisations that continue to move listeners.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Pianist James Williams, who appears with bassist Richard Reid tonight at Spaghettini, spent nearly five years with drummer Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers in the late '70s and early '80s, in editions that featured a young trumpeter named Wynton Marsalis, among others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
Recorded last year in Tokyo, the tenor saxophonist, pianist, bassist and drummer respectively sound like old, old musical friends; however, this melody-reigns session is their first date as a unit. Jordan, renowned for his robust, mahogany-tinged tone, has rarely been so perfectly captured in a studio--his low notes purr, his vaults into the upper reaches resonate and gleam.
NEWS
January 19, 1995 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Josef Woodard is an avowed cultural omnivore who covers art and music
On opening night of the Monterey Jazz Festival in September, the sight on stage was a strange one. The sound: weirdly, perfectly natural. There, side-by-side as in a showroom, was a row of four gleaming grand pianos, their keys being finessed by Mulgrew Miller, Geoff Keezer, Donald Brown, Harold Mabern Jr. and their fearless leader, James Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
James Williams, 53, a jazz pianist who recorded with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers and in his own ensembles, died Tuesday of liver cancer in New York City. A native of Memphis, Tenn., Williams began playing in his hometown at age 13, concentrating initially on gospel and soul. After graduating from Memphis State University, he moved to Boston to teach at the Berklee College of Music. He was a member of Blakey's band from 1977 to 1981 and wrote several compositions.
BOOKS
October 19, 2003 | Jonathan Kirsch, Jonathan Kirsch, a contributing writer to Book Review, is the author of the forthcoming "God Against the Gods: The History of the War Between Monotheism and Polytheism."
James BROWN is a novelist, and the casual reader might assume that his latest book is a hardboiled mystery rather than a memoir. The incidents depicted in "The Los Angeles Diaries" include arson and murder, alcoholism and drug abuse, rape and prostitution, adultery and divorce, and what links them is a tale of betrayal so profound that it seems almost mythic. But, as Brown allows us to understand, the tale that he tells is perfectly true.
BOOKS
April 1, 2001 | D.J. WALDIE, D.J. Waldie is the author of "Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir." His forthcoming book, in collaboration with photographer Marissa Roth, is "Real City.'
Could we have foreseen the winter of our disconnect? Could we have predicted January's blackouts and this summer's promise of more to come or counted in advance the windfall billions collected by Sun Belt power suppliers with shiny, abstract names like Enron and Dynegy or the millions more owed them by California's near-bankrupt utilities with their plodding 19th-century gas-and-electric names? The short answer is yes. We should have seen the darkness coming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in a color-coordinated dark- and light-blue bus driver's uniform, Ruby Holmes, a single mother and bus driver for 17 years, rushed up to strike leader James A. Williams and gave him a big hug. "Thank you," she said, moments after Williams gave an impassioned speech at a City Hall rally. The hug went beyond the dollars and cents issues at stake in the bus and rail operators' strike against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, now in its fifth week.
SPORTS
November 1, 1999
PASSING *--* Player, Team Att Cmp Yds TD KURT WARNER, Rams 46 29 328 3 PEYTON MANNING, Colts 34 22 312 1 DREW BLEDSOE, Patriots 22 14 276 4 BRIAN GRIESE, Broncos 40 24 274 1 CADE McNOWN, Bears 43 20 272 3 DOUG PEDERSON, Eagles 28 18 256 1 STEVE BEUERLEIN, Panthers 35 21 256 0 ERIC ZEIER, Buccaneers 44 29 256 0 KENT GRAHAM, Giants 42 26 240 1 DAMON HUARD, Dolphins 32 16 221 0 JEFF GEORGE, Vikings 29 17 218 2 BRAD JOHNSON, Redskins 25 15 204 2 ELVIS GRBAC, Chiefs 15 11 194 2 TIM COUCH, Browns 19
SPORTS
December 6, 1995 | Associated Press
Ernest Givins signed with Jacksonville intent on reviving his career and garnering votes for the Pro Football Hall of Fame. Instead, he didn't even make it through a season with the expansion team. Givins, the leading receiver in Houston Oiler history, was released by the Jaguars, the team he signed with as a free agent on June 2. Also cut was linebacker James Williams.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2000 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dressed in a color-coordinated dark- and light-blue bus driver's uniform, Ruby Holmes, a single mother and bus driver for 17 years, rushed up to strike leader James A. Williams and gave him a big hug. "Thank you," she said, moments after Williams gave an impassioned speech at a City Hall rally. The hug went beyond the dollars and cents issues at stake in the bus and rail operators' strike against the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, now in its fifth week.
SPORTS
April 25, 1989 | From Times wire services
Former World Boxing Council middleweight champion Lupe Aquino of Santa Paula, Calif., knocked out James Williams of Tucson at 2:31 of the first round in a middleweight fight Monday night. Aquino knocked Williams down three times. The knockout came on body shots. Aquino improved to 38-5. Williams fell to 11-17.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1995 | ZAN STEWART
This prime example of straight-ahead jazz exalts sumptuous melody and hard-driving rhythm. Here, creativity and entertainment are partners, not enemies. This a truly cross-generational session, sparked by trumpeter- fluegelhornist Clark Terry, 74, a master who--after 50 years in jazz--continues to let loose unique, walloping sound and vibrant improvisations that continue to move listeners.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
James Williams may be one of the most visible pianists on the New York scene but he had a hard time gaining respect from a Southern California crowd Tuesday at Spaghettini. But don't blame the 43-year-old Williams. His smashing performance, in tandem with bassist Richard Reid, showed why he is among the top-ranking keyboardists of the jazz world's middle generation.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|