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James Wolcott

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Lucking Out My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York James Wolcott Doubleday: 260 pp., $25.95 James Wolcott, takedown artist extraordinaire, is a byline that sends shivers of schadenfreude up the spines of fellow writers - at least when he's writing about someone else. A literary journalist who blows raspberries at mandarins, he's a mainstay of Vanity Fair's luxurious editorial lineup, his flashy prose outshining those gleaming, Mephistophelean ads peddling fantasies of the lucky one-percenters, his crap-cutting manner adding a bracing machete-whoosh to the magazine's day-spa elevator music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Lucking Out My Life Getting Down and Semi-Dirty in Seventies New York James Wolcott Doubleday: 260 pp., $25.95 James Wolcott, takedown artist extraordinaire, is a byline that sends shivers of schadenfreude up the spines of fellow writers - at least when he's writing about someone else. A literary journalist who blows raspberries at mandarins, he's a mainstay of Vanity Fair's luxurious editorial lineup, his flashy prose outshining those gleaming, Mephistophelean ads peddling fantasies of the lucky one-percenters, his crap-cutting manner adding a bracing machete-whoosh to the magazine's day-spa elevator music.
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BOOKS
June 10, 2001 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is a senior editor at Architectural Digest. His writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times Book Review, the New York Times Magazine and Forbes FYI
The question is perverse but irresistible: What would James Wolcott, the chronically disappointed cultural critic, make of "The Catsitters"--the debut of James Wolcott, the novelist? In nearly three decades of acid commentary on arts and letters, the author has earned a fearsome reputation going after the heavy hitters, flinging his withering epithets with all the facility and softheartedness of a ninja. Philip Roth's "misanthropy runs even deeper than his misogyny," Wolcott once wrote.
BOOKS
June 10, 2001 | JEFF TURRENTINE, Jeff Turrentine is a senior editor at Architectural Digest. His writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times Book Review, the New York Times Magazine and Forbes FYI
The question is perverse but irresistible: What would James Wolcott, the chronically disappointed cultural critic, make of "The Catsitters"--the debut of James Wolcott, the novelist? In nearly three decades of acid commentary on arts and letters, the author has earned a fearsome reputation going after the heavy hitters, flinging his withering epithets with all the facility and softheartedness of a ninja. Philip Roth's "misanthropy runs even deeper than his misogyny," Wolcott once wrote.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1986 | Pat H. Broeske
Sean Penn's allegiance to his upcoming film "At Close Range"--in which he had a creative hand--turned the usually press-shy camera-buster into a willing interview subject. The press push that started with a glowing Vanity Fair cover piece and continued with an incisive (and not so glowing) American Film profile includes upcoming stories in Elle magazine, USA Today and USA Weekend. But at least two publications turned down a shot at Hollywood's young lion. Why?
BOOKS
April 27, 1986
From time to time I wonder why I continue to read the book reviews in The Times. The recent review by James Wolcott of Christopher Buckley's "The White House Mess" (Book Review, March 30) highlights the problem. What little Wolcott describes makes the book sound riotously funny. Nevertheless, Wolcott's subjective descriptions ("winky dink," "wheezy" and "non-stop juvenile") appear to contradict this obvious reaction. What seems inescapable, however, is that Wolcott reveres P. G. Wodehouse, Kingsley Amis and Evelyn Waugh, and that Buckley, in Wolcott's opinion, does not live up to their standards.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1987 | Pat H. Broeske
The Dark Brothers, so called, are venturing out into the light. The one-time porn kings (one critic dubbed them "the most influential force in 'X' today") are going mainstream. But, sssssh , it's hush-hush. Currently shooting in and around L.A., Metropolis Pictures' "Dead Man Walking" (starring Wings Hauser as a mercenary tracking a psychotic killer) is exec produced by Walter Gernert and written and directed by Gregg Brown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2003 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Sloan Wilson, author of the bestselling 1955 novel whose title, "The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit," became a catch-phrase to describe frustrated suburbanites striving for the illusive and ever-more-expensive American Dream, has died. He was 83. Wilson died Sunday in Colonial Beach, Va., after suffering from Alzheimer's disease. He had lived on a boat in the sailing community for many years.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2005 | Samantha Critchell, Associated Press
The fashion world loves petite things, skinny things, colorful things -- except when it comes to its books. Among the season's fashion-themed, coffee-table, gift-worthy books the trends are big, thick and black and white. The mammoth "Louis Vuitton" (Abrams, $125), by Paul-Gerard Pasols, features a monogrammed leather handle on the cover, inviting readers to pull open the lid on the luxury brand's 151-year history.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2007 | Chris Lee, Times Staff Writer
In a year that has seen a veritable logjam of movie musicals, rockumentaries and biopics about famous singers -- and at a time when more such films are being green-lighted every month -- it was bound to come along: a magazine dedicated to the intersection of pop music and moviemaking. Enter Movies Rock, a custom publishing supplement that will be mailed to about 16 million subscribers of 14 Conde Nast magazines -- such as Vanity Fair, Vogue and GQ -- beginning Nov. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2013 | By Elisabeth Donnelly
The dark and twisty hit novel "Gone Girl" is taken to task by the best practitioner of dark literary arts, Mary Gaitskill, in this fall's Bookforum -- puzzlingly, about 15 months after the book's publication. Writer Mary Gaitskill is among the best practitioners of the arts of writing about women, sexuality, and the darkness that lies within the human heart, something perfected in her work, which includes "Bad Behavior" "Two Girls, Fat and Thin," and  "Don't Cry. " Gillian Flynn's "Gone Girl" was published in June of 2012, and fantastic word of mouth helped it become a huge bestseller.
NEWS
September 29, 1991 | SUSAN KING
PBS looks at American pop culture with its new series "Edge." The network says "Edge" will attempt to offer viewers "a daring, thoughtful vision of what makes America tick." The monthly series is hosted by the witty Robert Krulwich, the economic and business correspondent for CBS News and "CBS This Morning," and a frequent contributor to National Public Radio and The New York Times.
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