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James Wolfe

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September 24, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES CRITIC AT LARGE
Can an artist's eye transform his neighborhood? Director Tim Burton certainly thought so in "Edward Scissorhands," when an otherworldly boy's artistic soul made a whole tract development blossom, to say nothing of its people. But what about the real world and a serious New York sculptor, a recent transplant whose medium wasn't adorable topiary or pinked poodles but painted steel in abstract forms?
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES CRITIC AT LARGE
Can an artist's eye transform his neighborhood? Director Tim Burton certainly thought so in "Edward Scissorhands," when an otherworldly boy's artistic soul made a whole tract development blossom, to say nothing of its people. But what about the real world and a serious New York sculptor, a recent transplant whose medium wasn't adorable topiary or pinked poodles but painted steel in abstract forms?
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SPORTS
June 2, 1985 | JOHN FAWAZ
For a school that is three years old, Diamond Bar is building quite an athletic legacy. Diamond Bar won the 2-A baseball championship Saturday night--its third Southern Section title of the school year--with a 3-2 win over Mission Viejo in front of 3,187 fans at Blair Field. Diamond Bar also won a conference football title and a girls' team tennis title. Diamond Bar managed just three hits, but two came in the Brahmas' three-run, second-innning rally.
NEWS
June 16, 1994 | DAMITA J. QUASHIE
For third- and fourth-grade students at Westwood Charter School, two steel gates they designed and painted allow them to touch history, sort of. Applying what they learned in social studies classes, 62 students designed and painted the gates to symbolize California and its history. There are depictions of Mickey Mouse, a mission bell, a California gray whale, a Spanish galleon, a Hollywood Walk of Fame star and mountains. The students were optimistic that their work will be long-lasting.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1999 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shares of Carpinteria-based Balance Bar Co. plunged 31% Thursday on news that its first-quarter sales and earnings will fall far short of analyst expectations. The country's No. 2 nutrition bar maker said it expects earnings of 5 cents to 6 cents a share on sales of $20 million when its earnings are released later this month. The company was expected to earn 12 cents a share, according to an analyst poll by First Call Corp. Balance Bar had earned 11 cents on $17.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1993
As a responsible newspaper, The Times, in editorials and columns, has tracked this city's rising appetite for violence, questioning its sources and influences. For one striking influence, check the front page of Calendar, Aug. 20th ("In Woo's Hands, 'Target' Is Where the Action Is"). With a color photograph and prominent placement, Calendar highlights--in a negative review--the week's bloodiest movie, "Hard Target," which contains "fiery explosions . . . shattered glass and loving shots of larger-than-life rifles and handguns."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1994 | JENIJOY La BELLE, Jenijoy La Belle is a professor of literature at Caltech and author of books and articles on poets and their traditions.
On Feb. 16, 1751, the English poet Thomas Gray published "Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard." You may wonder why I mention this anniversary, especially if you've never heard of Gray or his poem. Maybe you figure it's the sort of thing only crotchety old literature professors remember. Yet the Elegy was once the most popular poem in the English language. Not only was it a triumph in its own time, but for 200 years it continued to be admired and loved.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | CHARLES HILLINGER
In the early-morning mist, Manhattan gallery owner Andre Emmerich drove his Jeep Cherokee over the rolling hills of his 140-acre retreat in Upstate New York. Suddenly out of the gray clouds loomed an imposing sight--four giant needles of steel that make up Beverly Pepper's four 27-foot-high statues, titled "Central Park Plaza." The 65-year-old Emmerich has collected about 120 bronze, steel and stone sculptures and has strategically placed them on his country estate that once was a Quaker farm.
BUSINESS
November 18, 1987 | From Reuters
CNW Corp., the sprawling Midwestern railroad that has been the subject of takeover speculation for much of the past year, said Tuesday that it accepted a sweetened $578-million takeover offer from an investment group. The deal is one of the first big acquisitions since last month's stock market collapse. But the $31-per-share price was well below industry analysts' estimates last summer that put CNW's value at more than $50 a share.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
THE LESSONS OF TERROR A History of Warfare Against Civilians: Why It Has Always Failed and Why It Will Fail Again By Caleb Carr Random House 272 pages, $19.95 "The Lessons of Terror" is a provocative essay inspired by the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. It was written in haste and shows it.
BUSINESS
July 22, 1998 | STEPHEN GREGORY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Carpinteria-based Balance Bar Co., distributor of the high-protein snack bar of the same name, reported record sales Tuesday, three months after launching ambitious growth plans to broaden distribution and boost exposure among consumers. The company posted $20.6 million in sales for the quarter ended June 30, an 86% jump over the same period last year. Net income for the quarter was $1.2 million and earnings per diluted share were 10 cents, a 2-cent increase over 1997's second-quarter earnings.
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