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James Wood

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the New Yorker this week, James Wood has a fascinating essay on the narrative implications of death. Inspired by the experience of attending a memorial service for a friend's younger brother, who died at 44 “suddenly, in the middle of things, leaving behind a wife and two young daughters,” it is a meditation on evanescence, serendipity and the way death offers a shape, a closure that life, with all its ongoing and overlapping turmoils, cannot....
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
The core of "Jamesy Boy" - a juvenile delinquent's inside-the-pen coming of age - follows a too-familiar trajectory: Due to the toxic mix of broken family and corruptive friends, James Burns (Spencer Lofranco) has already earned a tracking device on his ankle and an impressive rap sheet boasting robbery, vandalism, assault and firearm possession. Fresh-faced and all tatted up, James acts out as if emulous of the rapper MGK. Instead of being scared straight, he thrives in jail and fights anyone who gets in his way or menaces the defenseless Chris (Ben Rosenfield)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1995
Longtime labor and civic leader James M. Wood has been chosen by Mayor Richard Riordan to fill a vacant seat on the Los Angeles Recreation and Parks Commission, the mayor's office announced Friday. Wood, executive secretary treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO, was chairman of the Community Redevelopment Agency board during former Mayor Tom Bradley's Administration.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the New Yorker this week, James Wood has a fascinating essay on the narrative implications of death. Inspired by the experience of attending a memorial service for a friend's younger brother, who died at 44 “suddenly, in the middle of things, leaving behind a wife and two young daughters,” it is a meditation on evanescence, serendipity and the way death offers a shape, a closure that life, with all its ongoing and overlapping turmoils, cannot....
BOOKS
July 20, 2008 | Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a writer and critic living in Berlin.
TO CALL James Wood the finest literary critic writing in English today, as is commonplace, is to treat him like some sort of fancy terrier at Westminster. It both exaggerates and diminishes his importance. It exaggerates in its specious assignment of rank, an insult to Frank Kermode, Daniel Mendelsohn, Helen Vendler, Louis Menand and other fine critics. It diminishes insofar as its trophy is a consolation prize for being not only a dog but an ornamental one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James M. Wood, Los Angeles County's top labor leader and an architect of the city's downtown building boom of the 1970s and '80s, died Sunday evening of lung cancer. He was 51. In an era when organized labor was losing its influence nationally, Wood made it an equal partner with bankers and real estate developers in one of the most ambitious urban renewal projects in the country. "He caught the vision I had of rebuilding L.A.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Way back in 1967, Sacramento college student James Wood helped organize a mass protest against the higher education policies of then-Gov. Ronald Reagan. Wood recalls with pride that many thousands turned out at the state capital on a February day and that he--son of a telephone operator and a part-time telephone worker himself--shared the spotlight with Jesse Unruh, the late, legendary California Democrat and Reagan opponent.
BOOKS
June 20, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE BROKEN ESTATE; By James Wood; (Random House: 266 pp., $24) We worry that our subconscious has gotten shallow, like a shrinking aquifer, and we dare not speak its language. Someone might say, "What do you mean?" and in every house but James Wood's, we would fall through the floor, lonely, computer illiterate, old.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A move to oust the head of the Community Redevelopment Agency failed Tuesday when the Los Angeles City Council voted overwhelmingly to endorse Mayor Tom Bradley's reappointment of James Wood. Wood, who has chaired the CRA's board since 1984, had become a focal point for dissatisfaction with the agency's emphasis on downtown development. Wood has been a member of the board since 1977 and has helped bring about a dramatic rebirth of the downtown area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH and JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a rebuke of downtown development policies, a Los Angeles City Council committee on Monday voted against Mayor Tom Bradley's reappointment of James Wood as chairman of the Community Redevelopment Agency. "I cannot allow myself any longer to rubber-stamp the confirmation of someone who is in a position as important as you are," said Councilman Zev Yaroslavsky. "You want to create a dense urban core in downtown Los Angeles. Incredible. I cannot share that vision."
BUSINESS
October 9, 2011
Sited on a ridge top with city-to-ocean views, this Craftsman-exterior home was designed for its previous owner, actor James Woods. Inside, architect Lise Claiborne Matthews created the element of surprise with light-filled, contemporary interiors and bands of inlaid mahogany on the walls that wrap around corners, climb, dip, narrow and broaden from room to room. Location: 1520 Gilcrest Drive, Beverly Hills 90210 Asking price: $9,995,000 Previously sold: In 2002 for $5 million Year built: 1996 House size: Three bedrooms, four bathrooms Lot size: Nearly an acre Features: Stone and oak floors, five fireplaces, media room, library, gym, swimming pool, ponds, mature sycamores and pines About the area: In the first half of the year, 131 single-family homes sold in the 90210 ZIP Code at a median price of $2,726,000, according to DataQuick.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011 | By Mike Boehm and Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
In August, when James Cuno steps into the office with the magnificent eastward-looking panoramic view of L.A. that James Wood had occupied as president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, he'll also step into pretty much the same pay package, according to Getty spokesman Ron Hartwig. Had he lived, Wood, who was found dead of natural causes last June in his Brentwood home, was due to earn $728,000 a year in base pay for fiscal 2011-12, plus a $240,000 annual housing stipend; additionally, he would have received $500,000 in deferred payments this year that had been agreed to when he started in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2010 | By Jason Felch, Los Angeles Times
As the J. Paul Getty Trust grappled Monday with the void left by the sudden death of President and Chief Executive James Wood, current and former officials expressed both trepidation and hope about the future of the world's wealthiest visual art institution. Wood was found dead in the sauna of his Brentwood home late Friday evening after failing to appear at an appointment in Chicago, authorities said. The cause of death was a heart attack, said Lt. Fred Corral of the L.A. County Coroner's Investigation Division, adding that there were no signs of trauma or foul play.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 2010 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
James N. Wood, who helped the J. Paul Getty Trust regain its good name as its president and chief executive over the last three years and led the Art Institute of Chicago through 24 years of growth, died Friday, Getty officials announced. He was 69. Wood's body was found late Friday at his Brentwood home, Getty spokesman Ron Hartwig said. A statement by the Getty Trust said Wood died of natural causes. Wood had been expected to fly to Chicago on Friday morning for a meeting; when he failed to arrive, his wife, art historian and painter Emese Forizs, received a call in Rhode Island where she was with family, Hartwig said.
BOOKS
July 20, 2008 | Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Gideon Lewis-Kraus is a writer and critic living in Berlin.
TO CALL James Wood the finest literary critic writing in English today, as is commonplace, is to treat him like some sort of fancy terrier at Westminster. It both exaggerates and diminishes his importance. It exaggerates in its specious assignment of rank, an insult to Frank Kermode, Daniel Mendelsohn, Helen Vendler, Louis Menand and other fine critics. It diminishes insofar as its trophy is a consolation prize for being not only a dog but an ornamental one.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2007 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
James N. Wood, the new president of the J. Paul Getty Trust, owes his job partly to the indiscretions of his globetrotting predecessor. On Wednesday, in his first speaking engagement in L.A. since arriving to lend his 40 years of museum experience to the image-challenged Getty, he spoke repeatedly about the need to run it with a keen view toward acting locally.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1994 | BILL BOYARSKY
If you're a real political pro, nothing is personal. Today's enemy can easily be tomorrow's ally. That's the lesson of the relationship between Mayor Richard Riordan, a Republican businessman-turned-pol, and Jim Wood, a liberal Democratic labor leader. Wood, a tall, thin man with a friendly smile and calculating eyes, is secretary-treasurer of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor, AFL-CIO. This makes him one of the leading voices of organized labor in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1990 | JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two City Council members on Friday accused the Community Redevelopment Agency of attempting to conceal a pay raise or pension boost that apparently is in the works for the agency's executive director. CRA officials have refused to provide any information to the council about the matter, which is scheduled to come before the agency's board at a meeting next Thursday, according to council members Gloria Molina and Zev Yaroslavsky. Both are on the council committee that oversees the CRA.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2006 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
JAMES WOODS is the first to admit that his first full-time TV job isn't much of a stretch. On CBS' new show "Shark," he plays the loud and egotistical Sebastian Stark, an ostentatious Los Angeles defense lawyer who switches sides and joins the district attorney's office.
BOOKS
June 8, 2003 | Jeffrey Meyers, Jeffrey Meyers, a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, is the author of "D.H. Lawrence: A Biography," "Joseph Conrad: A Biography" and "Orwell: Wintry Conscience of a Generation" and has recently completed a life of Somerset Maugham.
On the scene but not a literary personality, writing with passionate intelligence and richly metaphorical style, James Wood has ignored the opaque aridity of literary theory and insisted on the human relevance of classic and modern literature. Born in 1965, he grew up in an evangelical Christian family in Durham, England, and sang in the cathedral choir. As a teenager, he tore himself away from belief in God and soothed his restless soul with art.
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