Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJames Worsham
IN THE NEWS

James Worsham

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Douglas Aircraft President James E. Worsham, the hard-driving airplane salesman who is widely credited with the historic turnaround of McDonnell Douglas' commercial aircraft business in the 1980s, will step down May 1. McDonnell Douglas named Robert H. Hood Jr. to succeed Worsham, who will turn 65 in April and leave under the company's mandatory retirement policy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 28, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Douglas Aircraft President James E. Worsham, the hard-driving airplane salesman who is widely credited with the historic turnaround of McDonnell Douglas' commercial aircraft business in the 1980s, will step down May 1. McDonnell Douglas named Robert H. Hood Jr. to succeed Worsham, who will turn 65 in April and leave under the company's mandatory retirement policy.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 6, 1987 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
James E. Worsham, president of Douglas Aircraft, has been promoted by McDonnell Douglas to corporate vice president-aerospace group executive, replacing Robert L. Johnson. In the new post, Worsham, who is credited with much of the Douglas subsidiary's recent success in commercial aircraft sales, will have responsibility for the Douglas division and for the McDonnell Douglas-Canada Ltd. subsidiary. William T.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1986 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, Times Staff Writer
Scandinavian Airlines System said Wednesday that it has placed a $1.4-billion order for 12 proposed MD-11 jetliners from McDonnell Douglas, apparently assuring the launch of the long-stalled program that will mean more than 6,000 new jobs to Southern California. With this order, a total of 26 of the successor to the DC-10 have been earmarked for production by Douglas Aircraft, a Long Beach division of McDonnell Douglas of St. Louis.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
In a major executive shake-up and reorganization, McDonnell Douglas Chief Executive John F. McDonnell removed any doubt Monday that he intends to reshape the firm's Douglas Aircraft unit in Long Beach. At a meeting of more than 5,000 managers called inside a paint hangar at Douglas, McDonnell disclosed a top-to-bottom reorganization of the commercial aircraft company, including the appointment of nine new executives to head up programs and special business areas.
BUSINESS
January 2, 1987 | JAMES FLANIGAN
What better way to start the new year than with a stunning display of U.S. competitiveness, an American company playing guts ball, carrying the game to its opponent and by so doing standing a better-than-even chance of success. The company is McDonnell Douglas, the St. Louis-based aerospace outfit that announced just before the old year ended that it was going ahead and building a new long-range passenger airplane.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
On a tarmac lined with aircraft and as a Marine band played a military march, Douglas Aircraft formally rolled out its first Navy T-45 jet Wednesday in a ceremony at the firm's Long Beach facility. "This is the proof of the pudding," Douglas President James Worsham said with a nod toward the firm's red-and-white T-45, a two-seat training jet that will be in production for the next decade under fixed-price contracts. "This is the real thing," Worsham added. "It is not cardboard."
BUSINESS
June 13, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas has significantly accelerated plans to develop a derivative of its DC-10 commercial jetliner and hopes to launch the program as early as the first quarter of 1986, company officials said Thursday. If McDonnell wins sales commitments from airlines and successfully continues production of the aircraft, it would represent a remarkable comeback for the DC-10, which has been a multimillion-dollar loser for the St. Louis firm's Douglas Aircraft subsidiary in Long Beach.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and NANCY YOSHIHARA, Times Staff Writers
Delta Airlines placed a $2-billion order with McDonnell Douglas on Thursday for 80 commercial jetliners to be built at the firm's Long Beach plant, a sale ranking among the largest in the industry's history. The deal represents another in a long series of critical commercial sales and military contracts that the Douglas Aircraft unit in Long Beach has received in recent years, fueling rapid growth that is expected to double the firm's size by 1990.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1989 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
McDonnell Douglas posted a $10-million first-quarter loss Friday, the result of a stunning $66-million loss at its Douglas Aircraft operation in Long Beach. Douglas took a $31-million charge on the Navy T-45 trainer aircraft program, a development under a fixed-price contract. The project has encountered problems that the company will have to solve at its own expense. The balance of the losses at Douglas, $35 million, apparently occurred on its commercial aircraft business.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
James E. Worsham, the executive widely credited with the historic turnaround at Douglas Aircraft, was reassigned Thursday in a McDonnell Douglas management shuffle that returned him to closer control of the Long Beach aircraft operation, which has suffered production problems. McDonnell Douglas announced that Worsham would give up his title of corporate vice president-aerospace group executive and "return to his previous position as president" of Douglas Aircraft. William T.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|