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James Yoshioka

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a long day of trying to persuade legislators to save his hospital and other health care programs from devastating budget cuts, the reality of California's fiscal crisis hit hospital executive James Yoshioka hard. "They simply don't have the money," Yoshioka said, his voice empty of the upbeat energy he had brought to the start of this whirlwind lobbying effort 11 hours before.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the end of a long day of trying to persuade legislators to save his hospital and other health care programs from devastating budget cuts, the reality of California's fiscal crisis hit hospital executive James Yoshioka hard. "They simply don't have the money," Yoshioka said, his voice empty of the upbeat energy he had brought to the start of this whirlwind lobbying effort 11 hours before.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1988 | ROBERT STEINBROOK and CLAIRE SPIEGEL, Times Staff Writers
Financially troubled Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center is exploring the possibility of an "expanded relationship" with nearby Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles as well as other area institutions as a means of reversing its mounting fiscal woes. "Absolutely no decisions have been made," said Allene Nungesser, the medical center's chief executive officer, of the "preliminary" discussions. "The institution is looking at ways to strengthen itself. We are not going to do anything precipitous."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fern Seizer has no illusions about what will happen at the Venice Family Clinic, which she runs, and other private medical clinics if Los Angeles County carries out plans to drastically cut health services to the poor. "It's awful, just awful," Seizer gasped Tuesday. "We see 169 patients a day, six days a week, and we already are turning away about 60 people a day."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1995 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With much of Los Angeles County's extensive network of public medical clinics slated to close in 45 days due to a budget crisis, health officials are trying to persuade private hospitals to take over and run clinics--with no county reimbursement. County officials began distributing bid documents this week to private medical providers interested in assuming management of six county comprehensive health centers and up to 39 smaller clinics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2005 | Charles Ornstein, Times Staff Writer
A single chief executive officer should be appointed to manage both the troubled Martin Luther King Jr./Drew Medical Center and its affiliated medical school, instead of the current separate leadership, a task force will recommend today. A unified management, according to the proposal, would eliminate the finger-pointing and poor coordination between Los Angeles County, which runs King/Drew, and the Charles R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Seven nominees for the new board of directors of the private, nonprofit Martin Luther King Jr. Hospital were announced by Los Angeles County's chief executive and University of California officials Thursday, the latest step toward reopening the hospital in 2013. All of the nominees have more than a decade of experience in healthcare, business or law. The nominees: —Manuel A. Abascal, a partner at Los Angeles-based Latham & Watkins —Dr. Elaine Batchlor, chief medical officer of L.A. Care Health Plan —Linda Griego, president and chief executive of Los Angeles-based Griego Enterprises Inc. and a former Los Angeles deputy mayor —Paul King, president and chief executive of Childrens Hospital Los Angeles Medical Group —Michael Madden, a retired former chief executive of Providence Healthcare of Southern California —Dr.
NEWS
June 18, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by the sagging economy and pessimistic that voters will approve a massive public hospital building project, Los Angeles County officials have quietly turned to private hospitals for help in alleviating overcrowding at county hospitals. In the last week, the county Department of Health Services has mailed letters to 141 private hospitals, proposing to lease beds or contract for specific health care services as an alternative to building hospitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1987 | HARRY NELSON, Times Medical Writer
California, which once ranked seventh best in the nation in preventing infant mortality, has fallen to 14th place largely because of the rising number of women who receive late or no prenatal care, according to a private study released Monday. An estimated 40,000 California babies this year will die at birth or soon thereafter, or will begin their lives at risk for serious medical problems that are largely preventable through adequate prenatal care, according to the report.
NEWS
July 30, 1995 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan under consideration by the County Board of Supervisors to shut down clinics in some of the poorest parts of Los Angeles may be what is needed to get the county through another fiscal year. But doctors at the clinics and even those who proposed the closings agree that unless the clinics are reopened soon the health of all county residents will be endangered and that the long-term costs will far exceed the money saved.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The billboard directly across from Women's and Children's Hospital urges pregnant patients receiving prenatal care at the county-run facility to deliver their babies at a private hospital less than a mile away. The sign for White Memorial Medical Center shows a healthy, round-cheeked baby under a caption in Spanish: "With Medi-Cal, Mama and I have a private room." Left unsaid is that at the aging county hospital across the street, most new mothers find themselves two or even four to a room.
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