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Jamestown Island

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NEWS
December 28, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 400 years, the questions persist. Were there American Indians living on Jamestown Island when the first permanent English settlers landed in 1607? Where did the 104 colonists build their first fort? What kind of vegetation did they encounter? And after centuries of shoreline erosion, is it possible to know where they actually landed? Jamestown is no reconstructed historical Disneyland in the manner of nearby Colonial Williamsburg.
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NEWS
September 13, 1996 | JOSH GREENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Archeologists say they have found the remains of the first permanent English settlement in America--the fort at Jamestown Island, Va.--a nearly 400-year-old structure that was long thought lost to history. Discovery of the structure, a fort built in 1607, would be among the most important archeological finds in American history if confirmed by further digging and research.
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TRAVEL
May 6, 1990 | Randy Kraft
How to Get There: Jamestown, Yorktown and the more popular Colonial Williamsburg, which lies between them, are on the Virginia Peninsula between Norfolk and Richmond. They comprise what is known as Virginia's Historic Triangle. All are linked by the 23-mile Colonial Parkway, completed in 1957. No commercial vehicles are allowed on the two-lane road, which goes through a tunnel beneath Williamsburg.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | PETER BAKER, WASHINGTON POST
The trees don't talk, and there's not a waterfall in sight. The only John Smith around here is an older fellow with an imposing glare and a full beard. And as for Pocahontas, she's hardly a long-haired, buxom beauty. "She looks like a man!" declared 8-year-old Brooke Charlesworth. This is where history and Hollywood mix and, for this summer at least, it's an odd concoction indeed.
TRAVEL
May 6, 1990 | RANDY KRAFT, ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
The biggest surprise is that there is no town at Jamestown, the first "permanent" English settlement in North America. Little physical evidence remains of what once was a small but bustling seaport that served as Virginia's first capital for 92 years. It had substantial brick houses, a large church and several statehouses. Some visitors may be disappointed, especially if they go to Jamestown after spending a day or two at the nearby restored Colonial-era community of Williamsburg.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | PETER BAKER, WASHINGTON POST
The trees don't talk, and there's not a waterfall in sight. The only John Smith around here is an older fellow with an imposing glare and a full beard. And as for Pocahontas, she's hardly a long-haired, buxom beauty. "She looks like a man!" declared 8-year-old Brooke Charlesworth. This is where history and Hollywood mix and, for this summer at least, it's an odd concoction indeed.
NEWS
September 13, 1996 | JOSH GREENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Archeologists say they have found the remains of the first permanent English settlement in America--the fort at Jamestown Island, Va.--a nearly 400-year-old structure that was long thought lost to history. Discovery of the structure, a fort built in 1607, would be among the most important archeological finds in American history if confirmed by further digging and research.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998
Virginia researchers believe they have discovered the skeletal remains of Mistress Forrest who, in 1608, became the first woman in the first permanent English settlement in the New World at Jamestown Island. A team from the Society for Preservation of Virginia Antiquities says it bases its conclusions on the following evidence: The skeleton belongs to someone whose diet consisted of wheat, not corn, indicating she was a recently arrived European.
NEWS
October 6, 1996 | Associated Press
Archeologists have removed the skeleton of one of the first English settlers in America from its nearly 400-year-old grave on Jamestown Island. It took 12 hours Sept. 24 to lift the skeleton in one piece surrounded by a half-ton cocoon of crumbling clay. Archeologists originally planned to remove the skeleton in several pieces, but chief archeologist William Kelso rejected conventional excavation methods in an attempt to retrieve the skeleton undisturbed.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | SONJA BARISIC, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The herring gull scoops a clam out of a muddy creek, flies 200 yards to a road, rises a few feet higher, opens its bill and bam!--the clam hits the pavement. That scene may be repeated hundreds of times a day during the winter as herring gulls on Jamestown Island use the road to crack open the hard shells so they can retrieve and eat the meat. "They are quite resourceful," said Daniel A.
NEWS
December 28, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After 400 years, the questions persist. Were there American Indians living on Jamestown Island when the first permanent English settlers landed in 1607? Where did the 104 colonists build their first fort? What kind of vegetation did they encounter? And after centuries of shoreline erosion, is it possible to know where they actually landed? Jamestown is no reconstructed historical Disneyland in the manner of nearby Colonial Williamsburg.
TRAVEL
May 6, 1990 | Randy Kraft
How to Get There: Jamestown, Yorktown and the more popular Colonial Williamsburg, which lies between them, are on the Virginia Peninsula between Norfolk and Richmond. They comprise what is known as Virginia's Historic Triangle. All are linked by the 23-mile Colonial Parkway, completed in 1957. No commercial vehicles are allowed on the two-lane road, which goes through a tunnel beneath Williamsburg.
TRAVEL
May 6, 1990 | RANDY KRAFT, ALLENTOWN MORNING CALL
The biggest surprise is that there is no town at Jamestown, the first "permanent" English settlement in North America. Little physical evidence remains of what once was a small but bustling seaport that served as Virginia's first capital for 92 years. It had substantial brick houses, a large church and several statehouses. Some visitors may be disappointed, especially if they go to Jamestown after spending a day or two at the nearby restored Colonial-era community of Williamsburg.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Studies of oyster shells taken from an abandoned well confirm that English colonists who settled on Jamestown Island in 1607 unknowingly picked the worst possible time for their endeavor, arriving in the midst of a drought nearly unprecedented in local history. Research on tree rings had already shown that the colonists' arrival in Virginia coincided with the beginning of the driest seven-year period in 800 years, and their written records — albeit scanty — confirmed that they encountered near-horrific privation.
NEWS
June 26, 1989 | BOB DROGIN and WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writers
Officials battling oil spills in Rhode Island and Texas said Sunday they are optimistic that quick cleanup efforts had prevented serious environmental damage, while experts trying to contain an 800,000-gallon tanker leak on the Delaware River were more guarded. The Rhode Island mishap--caused when the Greek tanker World Prodigy struck a well-marked reef Friday at the mouth of Narragansett Bay near Newport, R.I.--was downgraded from early estimates of 1.6 million gallons of No. 2 heating oil to 420,000 gallons by Coast Guard Adm. Richard I. Rybacki.
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