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Jamex De La Torre

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November 7, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng / Special to the Los Angeles Times
High and low culture, the sacred and the profane, the esoteric and the pop collide in the works of Einar and Jamex de la Torre, brothers who have collaborated closely as artists for 20 years. Although they started working in glass, shaping figurative work that often borrowed themes from their Mexican roots, they have moved toward larger sculpture and installation work, several of which anchor their retrospective, "Borderlandia: Cultural Topography by Einar and Jamex de la Torre" at the Craft and Folk Art Museum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
“Artifex,” at Koplin Del Rio, is a group exhibition of Chicano artists that claims to transcend Chicano identity. It's not clear exactly what this means, but the show draws some nice connections between artists who are far-flung except, of course, for their Chicano identities. Have we come so far that it is surprising to find Chicano artists have something in common? Or is it proof that there is something called “Chicano art”? At any rate, there is a sympathetic vibration between Shizu Saldamando's delicately drawn portraits of her hip young friends and Harry Gamboa Jr.'s black and white photographs of his Chicano male buddies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
“Artifex,” at Koplin Del Rio, is a group exhibition of Chicano artists that claims to transcend Chicano identity. It's not clear exactly what this means, but the show draws some nice connections between artists who are far-flung except, of course, for their Chicano identities. Have we come so far that it is surprising to find Chicano artists have something in common? Or is it proof that there is something called “Chicano art”? At any rate, there is a sympathetic vibration between Shizu Saldamando's delicately drawn portraits of her hip young friends and Harry Gamboa Jr.'s black and white photographs of his Chicano male buddies.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2010 | By Scarlet Cheng / Special to the Los Angeles Times
High and low culture, the sacred and the profane, the esoteric and the pop collide in the works of Einar and Jamex de la Torre, brothers who have collaborated closely as artists for 20 years. Although they started working in glass, shaping figurative work that often borrowed themes from their Mexican roots, they have moved toward larger sculpture and installation work, several of which anchor their retrospective, "Borderlandia: Cultural Topography by Einar and Jamex de la Torre" at the Craft and Folk Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thankfully for artists Jamex and Einar de la Torre, Rudy Giuliani is not mayor of Los Angeles. Their mixed-media sculpture takes an irreverent, thought-provoking look at some of Catholicism's most sacred symbols: the Virgin of Guadalupe and the crucifix. Those symbols are used to comment on sex, love, money, gender roles, power and commercialism. Nothing is too heady for the brothers to take on.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
BERKELEY -- Enrique Chagoya is a savvy, rambunctious and surprisingly respectful thief. He takes what he needs from the general store of art history and uses it to furnish his own aesthetic. He plucks a few cartoon superheroes off the shelf, sets them among Aztec gods, borrows some settings from Goya, the soup can motif from Warhol, a color scheme from Russian revolutionary propaganda, a handful of icons from the Catholic Church, a touch of Disney.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In baroque art, display is everything. In the 17th century, visual information pumped up to a dynamic level of ostentatious show went hand in hand with European expansionism and a struggle by the Catholic Church against a rising tide of Protestantism. Baroque art was at the very foundations of the modern world. Now, four centuries later, the wildly diverse, often aggressive manner we think of as the baroque aesthetic might be tied more closely to the extravagant spectacles of popular culture.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2007 | David Pagel, Special to The Times
For the last decade or so, big museums in the United States have made lots of noise about including contemporary art from Central and South America in their exhibition schedules. What actually gets shown, however, is a safe roster of international superstars, the same handful of artists from such places as Mexico City, Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro whose works have received an institutional stamp of approval and regularly appear at biennials, fairs and commercial galleries.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 2002 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When was the last time you broke out in song doing something you loved? Think back. Take your time. Even if you don't have many seconds to spare for such silly questions. If it helps, include those occasions you started singing when you were doing something uninteresting, like sitting in traffic, washing dishes or cutting the lawn.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2008 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
Photographer Mike Disfarmer's life lends itself to mythologizing, and he got the ball rolling. He claimed to have been deposited by a tornado into the backyard of the Meyer family home in Indiana in 1884. He later settled with his mother in Heber Springs, Ark. A few years after her death in 1935, he shed his birth name and dubbed himself Disfarmer as a way of publicly distancing himself from the cotton, corn and sorghum growers in the area.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 12, 2000 | LORENZA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thankfully for artists Jamex and Einar de la Torre, Rudy Giuliani is not mayor of Los Angeles. Their mixed-media sculpture takes an irreverent, thought-provoking look at some of Catholicism's most sacred symbols: the Virgin of Guadalupe and the crucifix. Those symbols are used to comment on sex, love, money, gender roles, power and commercialism. Nothing is too heady for the brothers to take on.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 2002 | SCARLET CHENG
An Olmec head has landed, mounted on a lunar landing module, in the Fisher Gallery at USC. Around it are car tires that suggest craters, coiled silver-colored serpents, and an astronaut, a la Neil Armstrong, planting a fluttering American flag--except this spaceman's suit is encrusted with stone-textured snakes and hands, his backpack contains a giant heart, and the flag is made of perforated sheet metal, mounted on a pole of soldered chain links.
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