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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1999
I read Jamie Court's unfair criticism of insurance agents' and brokers' role in the health care delivery system (Commentary, Oct. 12) and must point out what that role is. Court neglects to say that the role of the broker is to provide real consumer advocacy on behalf of both employers and employees alike. The insurance broker is the first line of defense for patients who have unsatisfactory treatment by either their HMO, medical group, or personal physician. I and others like me provide the type of advocacy that makes 86% of the insured consumers say in survey after survey that they are satisfied with their insurance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
September 9, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Jamie McCourt has no legal basis to force her ex-husband to share his record profit from the sale of the Dodgers, a judge ruled Monday. In a 57-page ruling, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon repeatedly dismissed Jamie McCourt's claim that she was unaware of the potential values of the Dodgers and of a regional sports network as “not credible.” Frank McCourt sold the Dodgers for $2.15 billion last year, five months after Jamie...
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1997
Kaiser's subscription to general HMO consumer protection principles has been hailed as courageous, but it is mostly correctly described as clever ["Kaiser, 2 Other HMOs Join to Back Laws to Protect Patients," Sept. 25]. HMOs like Kaiser have been on the run from reformers for their odious denials of doctor-recommended treatment, profiteering and lack of accountability. Most glaringly, an unintended glitch in federal law has prevented injured patients from receiving damages against HMOs that deny them medically necessary care.
SPORTS
April 19, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
Neither Frank nor Jamie McCourt spared any expense in enlisting a team of attorneys for what is believed to be the costliest divorce case in California history. The case had apparently ended with a settlement in October 2011, in which Jamie McCourt accepted $131 million and relinquished any claim to the Dodgers. Jamie McCourt signed the agreement against the advice of one of her attorneys, Bert Fields. In an email he sent to one of Frank McCourt's attorneys, Fields said he had advised Jamie McCourt not to proceed, in the belief that her ex-husband had not provided all the financial information necessary "for her to make an informed decision.
OPINION
January 26, 1997
Re "HMO Trend Demands Eagle-Eyed State Oversight," by Jamie Court, Commentary, Jan. 15: The Kaiser Foundation Health Plan is indeed a nonprofit organization, and the "profits" Court discusses so glibly are plowed right back into the health plan to benefit the members through new technology, upgraded facilities and expanded services. According to the California Medical Assn.'s analysis of various public financial filings, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan spends 96.8% of every dollar on actual medical care--more than any other California health plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1997
Vince Reel's "Gripe" (Voices, July 19) with the HMO, which left his cancer undiscovered and untreated for two months while his weight dropped 50 pounds, raises yet another question. Reel quit the HMO and got his treatment from a fee-for-service doctor. Who gained from this despicable incident? The HMO! The very wrongdoer that caused it. Medicare HMOs are paid 95% of the average monthly expense of caring for a person in the traditional setting. They get this every month, whether the patient is sick or well.
REAL ESTATE
December 12, 2004 | Ruth Ryon, Special to The Times
Actor Noah Wyle has sold his Los Feliz home for close to its $3.8-million asking price. The buyer was Robert Richardson, who won an Oscar in 1991 for best cinematography for "JFK." The house, which actor Tim Curry also once owned, is a restored Spanish colonial estate. It is on about 1.5 acres of lush grounds and has three bedrooms and 3 1/2 bathrooms in slightly more than 4,000 square feet. The home has hand-carved, hand-stenciled ceilings, a pool, an amphitheater, waterfalls and fountains.
SPORTS
July 13, 2004 | Ben Bolch, Times Staff Writer
Dodger co-owner Jamie McCourt might have been permanently blinded in her right eye after contracting a bacterial infection last month that has prevented her from attending games at Dodger Stadium. McCourt, 50, has been diagnosed with a corneal ulcer, a painful condition that has rendered her blind in her right eye. She is believed to have contracted the disorder last month when bacteria infiltrated her eye during one of her daily swims.
SPORTS
November 6, 2009 | Dylan Hernandez and Carla Hall
On the day the Angels re-signed Bobby Abreu to a multiyear deal, the future of the Dodgers started to take shape on the eighth floor of the Los Angeles Superior Court building. Slowly. While Jamie McCourt was denied her request to be immediately reinstated as the Dodgers' chief executive in an emergency hearing Thursday, the more important issue of whether she is a co-owner of the storied franchise along with soon-to-be ex-husband Frank McCourt did not become any clearer -- and probably won't be for some time.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Could it be time to get out of Dodge? Former Dodgers Chief Executive Jamie McCourt is quietly offering her Westside estate at $65 million. The Palladian-style villa, which is not in the Multiple Listing Service, was marketed as having 20,000 square feet of living space when she and ex-husband Frank McCourt bought the property in 2004 for about $25 million. Also on the 2.6-acre site then were two guesthouses, a tennis court and an outdoor swimming pool. She has since added a subterranean indoor pool.
SPORTS
April 19, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
In October 2011, Jamie McCourt agreed to a divorce settlement in which she would get $131 million and give up any claim to the Dodgers. Six months later, the Dodgers sold for $2 billion. "I was surprised I could have made such a huge mistake," she testified Friday. McCourt returned to Los Angeles Superior Court on Friday, for the first day of a hearing in which she has asked Judge Scott Gordon to throw out the divorce settlement. Frank McCourt, her ex-husband and the former Dodgers owner, also was in court, although Jamie McCourt was the only  witness to testify Friday morning.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Could it be time to get out of Dodge? Former Dodgers Chief Executive Jamie McCourt is quietly offering her Westside estate at $65 million. The Palladian-style villa, which is not in the Multiple Listing Service, was marketed as having 20,000 square feet of living space when she and ex-husband Frank McCourt bought the property in 2004 for about $25 million. Also on the 2.6-acre site then were two guesthouses, a tennis court and an outdoor swimming pool. She has since added a subterranean indoor pool.
SPORTS
September 26, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
Jamie McCourt, ex-wife of former Dodgers owner Frank McCourt, has filed a motion to set aside the couple's divorce settlement, claiming he committed fraud by vastly understating the team's value. Jamie McCourt's attorney, Bertram Fields, told the Associated Press on Tuesday that she "thought very long and very hard about whether to file this motion" but after other means failed she was forced to return to court over the value of the team that sold for $2 billion in May. "Mr. McCourt got about 93% of the family assets, and Mrs. McCourt got about 7%," Fields said in a phone interview.
SPORTS
April 5, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
SAN DIEGO — Frank McCourt and Magic Johnson sat next to each other Thursday, the outgoing owner and the most famous of the incoming owners watching the Dodgers play on opening day. For McCourt and for Johnson, the work in the Dodgers sale is done. For the attorneys responsible for turning a winning bid into contractual agreements that satisfy the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, the race is on. The terms of the sale are scheduled to be filed in court Friday, the first of several steps required before April 30, when the deal is set to close.
SPORTS
March 23, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
With the sale of the Dodgers in its final stages, three key parties lodged objections Friday with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Major League Baseball, Fox Sports and Jamie McCourt each raised concerns that they asked the court to consider on or before April 13, the day of the scheduled hearing to approve the Dodgers' sale. The concerns appear unlikely to derail the sale. Frank McCourt, the Dodgers' outgoing owner, has agreed to provide the court with a sale agreement by April 6. In its filing, MLB claimed that the Dodgers used overly broad and legally inconsistent language in phrasing how the league and the team would release each other from future liability.
SPORTS
November 3, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Within 48 hours of agreeing to sell the Dodgers, team owner Frank McCourt officially surrendered his claim to what had been his Los Angeles homes. Under a divorce settlement filed Thursday in Los Angeles Superior Court, Jamie McCourt kept four homes — two in Malibu, one in Holmby Hills and one in Vail, Colo. Frank McCourt kept two homes, both in Massachusetts. The McCourts sold a second Holmby Hills home in August. Representatives for Frank McCourt did not immediately return messages asking whether he intended to move back to Massachusetts, where his family is deeply rooted.
SPORTS
April 28, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
One reason Commissioner Bud Selig has not approved a television contract with Fox that would serve as a financial lifeline for Dodgers owner Frank McCourt is that McCourt's ex-wife, Jamie, has not approved the deal, according to two people familiar with the matter. In correspondence with the commissioner's office, Jamie McCourt asserted her right to a say in the Dodgers' television deals by virtue of her half-ownership of the team, according to a person familiar with the communication.
SPORTS
November 30, 2010 | By Bill Shaikin and Carla Hall
Frank and Jamie McCourt had 11 days to consider a proposal to settle their divorce case, and with it the ownership of the Dodgers. As a noon deadline approached Tuesday, Frank accepted the proposal. Jamie turned it down. That could leave the issue of who owns the Dodgers in limbo into the new year, and perhaps beyond. The McCourts now await a ruling from Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon on the validity of a marital agreement that would provide Frank with sole ownership of the Dodgers.
SPORTS
October 18, 2011 | Bill Plaschke
One down, one to go. As you have probably heard by now, Jamie McCourt has finally left the Dodgers, surrendering all claims to a team she used as her personal makeup mirror. The cost to her ex-husband Frank McCourt will be $130 million. The idea that she will no longer be around to abuse one of the greatest opportunities ever enjoyed by a female sports executive is priceless. Even if Frank McCourt is somehow able to maintain ownership of the team, his bitter half is gone, and we should mark the occasion with a moment of sigh-lence.
SPORTS
October 17, 2011 | By Bill Shaikin
Frank and Jamie McCourt have reached a divorce settlement under which she would get about $130 million and relinquish any claim to a share of the Dodgers, multiple people familiar with the agreement told The Times. The settlement would remove Jamie McCourt as an obstacle to Frank McCourt's plan to retain ownership of the team by selling the Dodgers' television rights in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The agreement also would appear to set up a winner-take-all court showdown for the Dodgers between Frank McCourt and Commissioner Bud Selig.
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