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Jamie Dimon

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BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
WASHINGTON --Theatrics for Jamie Dimon's day on Capitol Hill began according to the script for high-profile Washington hearings, with requisite heckling from protesters. As the chairman and chief executive officer of JPMorgan Chase & Co. arrived to take his seat at a Senate Banking Committee hearing, a man in a brown blazer began shouting at Dimon as a crush of photographers snapped away. “Jamie Dimon's a crook," the man yelled, as Dimon appeared unfazed. "This guy should be going to prison.
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OPINION
February 12, 2014
Re "Errors could hurt college bound," Feb. 10 Such a simple word as "errors" diminishes the severity of purposely concealing grave misconduct by college applicants. The 11 Orange County students recently expelled from their high school over the cheating scandal in which they took part likely knew that what they were doing was wrong. Any college or university that wishes to keep the public's respect must have a standard policy of discarding any application deemed dishonest. Merely urging students who have cheated to "come clean quickly" is hardly enough.
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BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno
Maybe Jamie Dimon is more crooner than he is a banker -- at least in the ears of investors. JPMorgan Chase & Co. shareholders got a big boost as soon as their chairman and chief executive opened his mouth in testimony before Congress. The stock surged 1.6% on Wednesday to $34.30 at the closing bell -- a nearly $2-billion boost to the company's market value on a day when Wall Street tumbled. They don't call Dimon “the king of Wall Street” for nothing. In nearly two hours of testimony, Dimon told Congress the big bank took risks that were not complely understood.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Call it a tale of two sides of the capitalist system: JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s Jamie Dimon got $20 million for being CEO in 2013; each Oakland Raiderette got $1,250 for kicking up her heels in the same year. The Raiderettes are suing ; presumably, Dimon is smiling - all the way to the bank. True, the Raiders had another lousy year in 2013, though I'm not sure how much blame can be put on the cheerleaders. But as Forbes' Halah Touryalai wrote about our banker friend : “Despite what was arguably the bank's worst year under Dimon's reign, JPM's board is awarding the CEO a 74% raise which includes over $18 million in restricted stock.” Or, to quote a Raiderette: “Sis, boom, boooooooo.” It isn't fair.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
Legendary investor Warren Buffett has given his blessing to one potential nominee for Treasury secretary: Jamie Dimon, chairman and chief executive of JPMorgan Chase & Co.  Treasury Secretary Timothy H. Geithner has said he won't hang around for Obama's second term. Potential successors reportedly in the running include Jack Lew, White House chief of staff. Dimon steered the country's largest bank by assets through the financial crisis virtually unscathed and emerged as Wall Street's point-person in Washington.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
By next month, JPMorgan Chase & Co. will know whether shareholders want to strip the bank's star chief executive of his chairmanship. If a majority supports splitting the roles, what will Jamie Dimon do?  Dimon, who holds both jobs, declined to say in a conference call with reporters early Friday. It was an issue for JPMorgan's board, he said. "You should always listen to your shareholders,” Dimon said. "The board has plenty of time to think it through. " Some major shareholders have been calling for splitting the roles, saying it is a "best practice" for corporate governance.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- It was a tough election for Wall Street. Not only did the candidate it bet against , President Obama, win reelection, but the financial industry's nemesis Elizabeth Warren ascended to power as a U.S. senator. How will Wall Street make nice with Washington Democrats? Jamie Dimon, chairman and chief executive of JPMorgan Chase & Co., may have launched a charm offensive. Dimon told CNBC Friday afternoon that he called Warren to congratulate her on her victory over Sen. Scott Brown, the Republican from Massachusetts.  During her campaign, Warren called for Dimon to step down as a member of the board of the New York Federal Reserve.
BUSINESS
June 13, 2012 | By Andrew Tangel
WASHINGTON -- The "King of Wall Street" returns to Capitol Hill today, this time to explain how JPMorgan Chase & Co. sustained a $2-billion hole in its "fortress balance sheet. " Jamie Dimon, JPMorgan's chairman and chief executive officer, will face questions from the Senate Banking Committee on how the vaunted bank was stung by risky bets like those that bedeviled its Wall Street peers in the financial crisis. JPMorgan last month disclosed at least $2 billion in losses from risky derivatives trades.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The other day we examined a claim by the New York Times that Jamie Dimon, the chairman and chief executive of the serial lawbreaking bank company JPMorgan Chase, was supported in his job by "the people who matter" -- defined as " investors, analysts, board members and, yes, even regulators. " "None of them want him fired," asserted the writer, Andrew Ross Sorkin. Now, via Bloomberg, we find this isn't true . One important bank regulator not only wanted Dimon fired  but made it happen.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Who are the "people who matter"? According to Andrew Ross Sorkin of the New York Times , " investors, analysts, board members and, yes, even regulators," none of whom, he says, wants Jamie Dimon fired as chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase.  Is there a weaker argument for Dimon's survival, given that he has presided over an institution that tops all other big U.S. banks in the number and scale of its regulatory inquiries? ( We raised the question of Dimon's leadership record last week, after JPM reported its first quarterly loss of his tenure -- all due to the bank's spending on legal fees and legal settlements.)
BUSINESS
December 27, 2013 | By Tom Petruno
Wall Street had plenty of reasons to think 2013 would go miserably for the stock market - what with a lackluster global economy, the U.S. government shutdown, Syria's civil war, the Obamacare fiasco and Miley Cyrus. Instead, we're on track for a 29% gain in the Standard & Poor's 500 index, which would be its best annual showing since 1997. So the highlight of the year for many Americans will be the repair job on their retirement savings accounts. But taking a broader view, here are six 2013 market memories that should endure: • Ma and Pa come back to stocks.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- JPMorgan Chase & Co. can't stop writing checks to the federal government. The nation's largest bank may, according to a person familiar with the matter, soon pay about $2 billion to settle investigations into its dealings with Bernard Madoff, the notorious fraudster whose epic Ponzi scheme collapsed five years ago. This next payout would come as the ink was still drying on a landmark $13-billion settlement the New York company struck...
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Marc Lifsher and E. Scott Reckard
NEW YORK - JPMorgan Chase has agreed to a $13-billion settlement with the government over selling shoddy mortgage investments, ending a legal battle that signals a tougher stance against Wall Street wrongdoing. The nation's largest bank admitted to knowingly peddling the toxic securities that helped lead to the housing bubble and the worst financial meltdown since the Great Depression. The settlement is the largest made by any single American company in history. California, slammed by 1 million foreclosures during the mortgage meltdown, will be a major beneficiary of the deal.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
JPMorgan Chase & Co. probably thought things couldn't get any worse than the $13 bilion it is expected to pay in a legal settlement with the government. Then it stumbled into a public-relations debacle on Twitter. The beleaguered banking giant asked Twitter users to submit questions to one of its top deal-makers for a planned Twitter chat Thursday. Using the hashtag #AskJPM, the company said Jimmy Lee would be responding to queries on "leadership and life. " The phrase quickly began trending on Twitter on Wednesday afternoon.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Marc Lifsher and Andrew Tangel
Jamie Dimon, arguably the nation's most powerful banker, has navigated intense scrutiny from Congress, the White House and regulators around the globe. But it's a federal prosecutor in Sacramento, far from the world's financial and political capitals, who pinned the chairman of JPMorgan Chase & Co. to the wall. U.S. Atty. Benjamin B. Wagner led the investigators who forced JPMorgan into talks now widely expected to produce a $13-billion settlement of fraud allegations. His team delivered key evidence revealing how JPMorgan misled investors while peddling bonds backed by subprime and "liar" loans from the housing bubble.
BUSINESS
October 21, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
JPMorgan Chase, one of our nation's ethically-challenged financial institutions, is facing another big fine. That means that once again you'll be hearing the right wing's go-to defense of the bank: President Obama's out to get JPMorgan Chairman Jamie Dimon. The leading purveyor of this line is the Wall Street Journal editorial page, which wrote last month that Dimon is "the Obama Administration's favorite Wall Street target" because he "keeps deviating from the Obama script. " The claim is that Dimon ticked off the White House by objecting to Dodd-Frank financial reforms, grousing about Obama's "anti-business rhetoric," and even hinting that "he preferred a change in the White House.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
Jamie Dimon, the chairman and chief executive of JPMorgan Chase & Co., has quietly left the board of the New York Federal Reserve. Dimon didn't relinquish his board membership to silence critics who, in the middle of last year, saw a conflict of interest -- or at least an appearance of one -- after JPMorgan suffered an embarrassing loss in a risky bet, despite the New York Fed's oversight. "This is a clear example of the fox guarding the henhouse," Sen. Bernard Sanders (I-Vt.)
BUSINESS
May 21, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
A JPMorgan Chase & Co. shareholder proposal to split the bank's chairman and chief executive roles -- now both held by Jamie Dimon -- failed to win a majority's support Tuesday. The proposal to split Dimon's jobs at the nation's largest bank won only 32.2% of the votes, according to a preliminary tally announced at JPMorgan's annual shareholder meeting in Tampa, Fla.. The marquee vote was seen as a referendum on Dimon's leadership and as a potential harbinger of growing shareholder power in corporate decision-making.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Yes, $13 billion in penalties --the figure at the center of the JPMorgan mortgage settlement deal being reported Saturday--is eye opening. Yes, it's a record in a civil proceeding against a major corporation. But the most significant thing about JPMorgan's deal with the Department of Justice may be what it doesn't do. It doesn't resolve the ongoing federal criminal investigations of the bank's conduct in the residential mortgage securities business during the run-up to the 2008 financial crisis.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- A large chunk of JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s mounting legal bills may get even bigger. The nation's largest bank could now pay a record $13 billion to settle a raft of federal and state probes, according to a person familiar with the negotiations. Such a settlement would be an increase from the $11-billion figure under discussion three weeks ago when Jamie Dimon, the bank's chairman and chief executive, attended a high-level meeting in Washington, D.C., with Atty. Gen. Eric Holder.
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