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Jamie Gorelick

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January 15, 1995 | Ronald Ostrow, Ronald Ostow covers the Justice Department for The Times. He interviewed Jamie Gorelick in her office
It was 9:30 p.m., and a senior aide to Deputy Atty. Gen. Jamie S. Gorelick was about to call it a day when a string of E-mail messages flashed across his computer screen. The messages were from his boss--who had left the office three hours earlier. Gorelick, it turned out, had gone home for supper with her husband and two young children; then, the kids tucked in for the night, she was putting in a couple more hours of work on her home computer.
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NATIONAL
April 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
House Judiciary Committee Chairman F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.) called for Jamie Gorelick to resign from the Sept. 11 commission Wednesday, citing a memo she wrote as a deputy attorney general on separating counterintelligence from criminal investigations. Gorelick, a Democrat, said she would not resign and suggested that the Wisconsin lawmaker might be looking for a way to silence her. "When you ask hard questions of people who are in office, they take offense," she said.
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NATIONAL
April 15, 2004 | From Associated Press
House Judiciary Committee Chairman F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.) called for Jamie Gorelick to resign from the Sept. 11 commission Wednesday, citing a memo she wrote as a deputy attorney general on separating counterintelligence from criminal investigations. Gorelick, a Democrat, said she would not resign and suggested that the Wisconsin lawmaker might be looking for a way to silence her. "When you ask hard questions of people who are in office, they take offense," she said.
OPINION
January 15, 1995 | Ronald Ostrow, Ronald Ostow covers the Justice Department for The Times. He interviewed Jamie Gorelick in her office
It was 9:30 p.m., and a senior aide to Deputy Atty. Gen. Jamie S. Gorelick was about to call it a day when a string of E-mail messages flashed across his computer screen. The messages were from his boss--who had left the office three hours earlier. Gorelick, it turned out, had gone home for supper with her husband and two young children; then, the kids tucked in for the night, she was putting in a couple more hours of work on her home computer.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
U.S. to Appeal Computer Network Indecency Ruling: The Justice Department said it will appeal to the Supreme Court a landmark ruling that struck down key parts of a new federal law barring indecency on computer networks. The decision had been widely expected since June 12, when a special three-judge federal panel in Philadelphia blocked enforcement of the law on the grounds it violated constitutional free-speech rights. Justice Department spokesman Carl Stern said Deputy Atty. Gen.
NEWS
February 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Michael Carns, a retired four-star Air Force general, is the front-runner to replace R. James Woolsey as director of the Central Intelligence Agency, Administration officials said Monday night. With a final decision expected any time, at least two other candidates also were still under consideration, according to officials inside and outside the Administration who are familiar with the search process. The other candidates are Deputy Atty. Gen.
OPINION
April 19, 2004
Re "Congressman Calls for 9/11 Panel Member to Step Down," April 15: The American public has not been well served by the 9/11 commission. Looking for direction to mitigate or prevent future terrorist attacks, we get a gang of politicians struggling with each other for individual attention. The Republican chairman, former New Jersey Gov. Tom Kean, smilingly pontificates on the public's right to know and then acrimoniously lashes out at the public, snarling, "People ought to stay out of our business."
NEWS
March 13, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Clinton plans to nominate Eric H. Holder Jr., the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, to become the No. 2 official at the Justice Department, a move that would make him the highest-ranking black law-enforcement officer in U.S. history. White House officials informed Holder that Clinton wanted him to replace Deputy Atty. Gen. Jamie S. Gorelick, who announced her resignation in January, administration sources said.
NEWS
February 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Atty. Gen. Janet Reno, whose first deputy resigned over management differences, is getting a replacement with whom she has worked comfortably: Jamie S. Gorelick, now the Pentagon's top lawyer. Reno announced that President Clinton will nominate Gorelick, 43, who helped craft the Administration's policy on gay men and lesbians in the military. She won praise from members of the congressional armed services committees for her straightforward testimony on the issue.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | Associated Press
Eric H. Holder Jr. won unanimous Senate confirmation Thursday to the Justice Department's No. 2 post, where he will be the highest-ranking black law-enforcement official in the nation's history. Holder, 46, the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia since 1993, will be deputy attorney general, replacing Jamie S. Gorelick. She resigned in the spring.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
It was standing room only in the Justice Department's Great Hall when Eric Holder Jr. was sworn in Friday as deputy attorney general, becoming the highest-ranking black law enforcement official in the nation's history. Sticklers might quibble that he actually has been on the job since July 18, a day after the Senate unanimously approved his nomination, but this was the day for pomp, hundreds of guests, speeches and a party in Atty. Gen. Janet Reno's office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1996
To the list of major issues inflaming U.S. relations with China--the piracy of American copyrights, Beijing's sale of nuclear and missile technology to Pakistan, human rights violations--must now be added gun smuggling. Seven Americans and Chinese have been arrested in the San Francisco Bay Area in the culmination of an 18-month sting operation by Treasury agents. The agents arranged to buy 2,000 AK-47 assault rifles, which under U.S. law may not be imported.
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