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Jamie Hundt

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June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but burgeoning mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. And what the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
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NEWS
June 4, 1990 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following leads developed in an FBI Capitol sting operation, U.S. Department of Justice antitrust attorneys are looking into allegations that anti-competitive sales practices in the contact lens industry have forced millions of users to pay higher costs for their lenses, The Times has learned.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but growing mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: Advised to Contact Lobbyist The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. What the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
NEWS
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but burgeoning mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. And what the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following leads developed in an FBI Capitol sting operation, U.S. Department of Justice antitrust attorneys are looking into allegations that anti-competitive sales practices in the contact lens industry have forced millions of users to pay higher costs for their lenses, The Times has learned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a case linked to the corruption trial of former state Sen. Joseph Montoya, the owners of a La Jolla mail-order contact lens firm filed a civil antitrust and racketeering suit Tuesday against Montoya and various optometric groups in federal court in San Diego. Seeking $60 million or more in damages, the husband-and-wife owners of Dial a Contact Lens Inc. charged that five contact-lens makers and three optometric groups have tried to put them out of business.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | From United Press International
State Sen. Joseph Montoya, on trial on federal corruption charges, testified in his own behalf today that aides either intentionally or by mistake are at fault for his legal problems. The 50-year-old Whittier Democrat, obviously nervous, was the first witness in what his attorneys say is likely to be the last week of the trial.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A San Diego businesswoman testified Thursday that a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya once advised her to give the senator $5,000 and said "if you wanted to dance you had to pay the fiddler." Jamie Hundt, testifying in Montoya's political corruption trial, said former aide Amiel A. Jaramillo told her that a $5,000 campaign contribution to the Whittier Democrat could help persuade the senator to grant a three-week delay to a bill pending in his Senate committee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | RALPH FRAMMOLINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jamie Hundt was a little girl from West Texas, her family took a vacation one year that included an impressive ride up a Sacramento street leading to the manicured lawn and white dome of the state Capitol. "We drove toward the Capitol, and I saw squirrels on the grounds, and I was awe-inspired," Hundt said. "I thought, 'This is the greatest place that could possibly be.' More than 20 years and a rude awakening later, Hundt visited Sacramento again this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, Times Staff Writer
When a top aide to Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) called the owners of a small but growing mail order contact lens business in San Diego last year, they were shaken by his news. An obscure bill, written by the California Optometric Assn., was due for a hearing before the Senate Business and Professions Committee, chaired by Montoya. If passed, the measure would very likely put the company, Dial A Contact Lens Inc., out of business. With minor variations, the various parties basically give this account: Advised to Contact Lobbyist The Montoya aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo, advised the owners--a husband-and-wife team--to contact a Sacramento lobbyist, and among those he recommended was David Kim. They did. What the lobbyist told Dieter and Jamie Hundt shook them even more--and provided a rare, behind-the-scenes insight into how private money often determines the course of little-noticed, special-interest legislation in Sacramento.
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