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Jamie L Whitten

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NEWS
February 3, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
DEAD OR ALIVE? NASA's decision to kill off a multibillion-dollar program to develop a new, more powerful solid rocket booster for the space shuttle fleet was a carefully planned move actually intended to help save the project, according to Capitol Hill insiders. . . . The advanced solid-rocket motor program, which would have cost nearly $500 million in 1993, was eliminated with the expectation that funds for the project will be restored by Rep. Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.
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NEWS
April 6, 1994 | KENNETH J. COOPER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Rep. Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.), who has served longer in the House than anyone else, announced his retirement Tuesday, two years after illness forced him from the chairmanship of the powerful Appropriations Committee. Whitten, who turns 84 in two weeks, was elected to an unexpired term a month before Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941 and is completing his 27th consecutive term representing northern Mississippi. The next senior member, Rep. Sidney R. Yates (D-Ill.), came to Congress in 1965.
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NEWS
June 6, 1992 | The Washington Post
House Democratic leaders appear to have laid down an ultimatum to Appropriations Committee Chairman Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.), telling him to voluntarily step aside until he recovers from a prolonged illness or be forced aside at a meeting of the Democratic caucus next week. "We're entering the busiest period of the appropriations process . . . and the chairman has to be operating at peak efficiency," said Rep. Vic Fazio (D-West Sacramento), vice chairman of the caucus.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | The Washington Post
House Democratic leaders appear to have laid down an ultimatum to Appropriations Committee Chairman Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.), telling him to voluntarily step aside until he recovers from a prolonged illness or be forced aside at a meeting of the Democratic caucus next week. "We're entering the busiest period of the appropriations process . . . and the chairman has to be operating at peak efficiency," said Rep. Vic Fazio (D-West Sacramento), vice chairman of the caucus.
NEWS
April 6, 1994 | KENNETH J. COOPER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Rep. Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.), who has served longer in the House than anyone else, announced his retirement Tuesday, two years after illness forced him from the chairmanship of the powerful Appropriations Committee. Whitten, who turns 84 in two weeks, was elected to an unexpired term a month before Japan bombed Pearl Harbor in 1941 and is completing his 27th consecutive term representing northern Mississippi. The next senior member, Rep. Sidney R. Yates (D-Ill.), came to Congress in 1965.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Tombigbee Waterway curves through these hills like a giant question mark, as though the land itself is puzzled over the mystery of it all. High on a bluff, where the Tennessee Valley Authority a few years ago dumped $1.5 billion into a nuclear power plant before abandoning the project, the big rigs are at work again.
NEWS
October 8, 1986
Congress, admitting it will not be able to finish its work until next week, will take up today another one-week emergency money bill to keep the government running, House Appropriations Committee Chairman Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.) said. The government's current spending authority under a stopgap one-week bill is due to run out at midnight.
NEWS
June 10, 1992 | Associated Press
Ailing House Appropriations Committee Chairman Jamie L. Whitten turned over the reins Tuesday to Rep. William H. Natcher of Kentucky, the panel's second-ranking Democrat. Whitten, 82, asked Natcher in a letter to preside over committee activities in the next few months, the busiest season of the year for the committee's writing of spending bills. The Mississippi Democrat, the House's longest-serving member, was being pressured by the Democratic Caucus to yield his chairmanship.
NEWS
January 7, 1992 | Reuters
Rep. Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.) on Monday broke the record for serving the longest term in the House of Representatives. Whitten, 81, chairman of the Appropriations Committee, as of Monday had been in the House 50 years, two months and 14 days--one day longer than the late Rep. Carl Vinson (D-Ga.) served. Whitten is still six years away from being the longest-serving member of Congress. The late Carl Hayden served the longest in the House and Senate combined.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER
Reps. Howard L. Berman (D-Panorama City) and Julian C. Dixon (D-Los Angeles) are spearheading an effort to ask President Bush to declare an emergency immediately so that federal funds can be appropriated to help rebuild riot-torn Los Angeles. The lawmakers wrote a letter that was signed by 23 other California Democrats and sent to Bush on Monday.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
DEAD OR ALIVE? NASA's decision to kill off a multibillion-dollar program to develop a new, more powerful solid rocket booster for the space shuttle fleet was a carefully planned move actually intended to help save the project, according to Capitol Hill insiders. . . . The advanced solid-rocket motor program, which would have cost nearly $500 million in 1993, was eliminated with the expectation that funds for the project will be restored by Rep. Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | LEE DYE, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The Tombigbee Waterway curves through these hills like a giant question mark, as though the land itself is puzzled over the mystery of it all. High on a bluff, where the Tennessee Valley Authority a few years ago dumped $1.5 billion into a nuclear power plant before abandoning the project, the big rigs are at work again.
NEWS
September 10, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
The chairman of the House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday proposed legislation that would provide $8.8 billion in relief for areas of South Florida and Louisiana devastated by Hurricane Andrew--$1.2 billion more than President Bush requested. The draft proposal, by Chairman Jamie L. Whitten (D-Miss.), is expected to be considered soon by the panel and rushed through the full House.
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