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Jamie Malanowski

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH
Michael Eisner for President? Hey, in this wacky election year, why not? That's what satirist, writer and now playwright Jamie Malanowski figures. A casting call has gone out for his Off Broadway production of "This Happy, Happy Land," which will feature an Eisner "act-alike" in the central role as President of the United States. In the play, Eisner, chairman of the Walt Disney Co.
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NEWS
October 9, 1992 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Mr. Stupid of the title, a rich Midwestern senator with a sweet, glassy expression, is married to a smart woman who manages to get him nominated for vice president. Fiction is less strange than truth. The fictional Sen. Brent Bibby would rather be playing tennis than running for higher office, but at the right moment, the very gorgeous Lucinda Bibby told the Republican presidential candidate, "I want to feel your presidential scepter."
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NEWS
October 9, 1992 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Mr. Stupid of the title, a rich Midwestern senator with a sweet, glassy expression, is married to a smart woman who manages to get him nominated for vice president. Fiction is less strange than truth. The fictional Sen. Brent Bibby would rather be playing tennis than running for higher office, but at the right moment, the very gorgeous Lucinda Bibby told the Republican presidential candidate, "I want to feel your presidential scepter."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | JANE GALBRAITH
Michael Eisner for President? Hey, in this wacky election year, why not? That's what satirist, writer and now playwright Jamie Malanowski figures. A casting call has gone out for his Off Broadway production of "This Happy, Happy Land," which will feature an Eisner "act-alike" in the central role as President of the United States. In the play, Eisner, chairman of the Walt Disney Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1995 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
One day Casey Kasem, the disc jockey with the kindly voice, lost his temper. He either didn't know or didn't care that he was being recorded. He was telling his listeners about the death of a little dog named Snuckles, when he got mad at some technician because he thought the segue music going into the Snuckles piece had been too upbeat. Suddenly Kasem was frothing at the mouth, using every four-letter word in the book.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing the House Armed Services Committee, which is demanding accountability for the $14 billion spent on a problem-plagued military vehicle, an Army general tries to put a patriotic spin on the situation by saying: "We are all taxpayers, after all. We're in this together." Wah-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha. If you weren't laughing, you'd be crying.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1989 | ELIZABETH LU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to deliver forbidden news to a China muted by censorship, the L.A. Weekly has joined in an international press campaign that is trying to break through government restrictions by sending bogus copies of the official Communist newspaper via the fax machine to support the pro-democracy movement. A spokeswoman for the L.A. Weekly said the Nov. 9 issue will contain excerpts from what appears to be the Communist newspaper People's Daily, the Chinese government's official publication.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1995 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is an occasional contributor to The Times
Loose lips often do more than sink ships. They destroy friendships and marriages, dash reputations, ruin careers, decimate business deals, occasionally throw whole governments into a tizzy. They can also make for some really funny theater. Such is the thinking behind "Loose Lips" (opening tonight at the Santa Monica Playhouse), a comedy revue created solely from real-life material: a wicked collection of court transcripts, secret tape recordings and open-mike transmissions.
NEWS
May 13, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday. His column is published Fridays
As chronicled at length in Inside Media, a biweekly trade publication, the last days of Spy were marked by nasty feuding among the staffers--the kind of meltdown the magazine used to gleefully discover in somebody else's back yard. "One of the plans had been to plant cocaine in my desk and then call the police," said a bitter Tony Hendra in the article.
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