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Jamie Masada

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
"I don't ever like to talk about what I've done for successful comedians," says Laugh Factory proprietor Jamie Masada. "I can only talk about what they've done for me. Comedians have made me what I am, and without them I'd be nobody." Masada plunged into the Hollywood comedy scene in 1974, a 14-year-old Israeli emigre traveling without family, without much money, and with oversized dreams of stand-up stardom.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2011 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
In Laugh Factory owner Jamie Masada's perfect world, each of his stand-up comics would kill it onstage at the Hollywood comedy club ? then they'd head upstairs and retreat into the club's inner sanctum, a small, wood-paneled private office on the top floor. There, he or she would lie back on a plush, red couch and partake in an often pricey indulgence that can bring on feelings of calm, release and euphoria. Debauchery of choice? Psychotherapy. On Monday, Masada will be starting an in-house therapy program for Laugh Factory comics ?
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MAGAZINE
December 6, 1998 | Dave Gardetta
It's a languid fall afternoon, and Jamie Masada is doing what he is best at--parting the waters to lead a struggling comedian to the promised land. Try to imagine Michael Eisner agonizing over the fate of every entertainer yearning to join the Disney family and you begin to understand that Masada, owner of the Laugh Factory on Sunset Boulevard, is an Industry aberration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1999 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angelenos who ventured to the Laugh Factory on Thursday got more than a laugh. In addition to healthy helpings of humor, they were treated to ample portions of hospitality and a Thanksgiving meal with all the fixings. For nearly 20 years, the comedy club's owner, Jamie Masada has invited the homeless, plus comedians and actors awaiting their big break, to celebrate turkey day with him. Thursday, a smiling Masada once again stood in front of the main door and welcomed visitors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Joining Together: Laugh Factory owner Jamie Masada, who in the past has provided free Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners at his establishment for entertainment industry people who are new to Los Angeles and have no family here, now is going to provide Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services. Masada says "no money, and no tickets" are required for the services on Monday and on Oct. 6-7, but an RSVP is essential.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1997
I very much enjoyed your article on up-and-coming people to watch for in 1997 (Jan. 5). As a volunteer to a variety of Jewish organizations, I can give you another perspective of Jamie Masada of the Laugh Factory. Whenever any of the organizations contact him for use of his club or for charitable donations, he has never turned us away. He is the most kind businessman I have ever encountered. I wish the best for him in 1997 and beyond. HARRY ROSENFELD Los Angeles
BUSINESS
August 27, 1990 | From United Press International
Writers Allege Movie Deal Interference: Two comedy writers who developed a screenplay for an ABC "Movie of the Week" about a college that teaches comedy classes sued a fellow writer on grounds that he sabotaged the deal by claiming that the idea was his. Vic Dulop's and David Miller's federal court suit accused Jamie Masada of unlawfully misappropriating their rights to the screenplay by producing a similar script entitled "Laugh Factory."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993
I am the owner of the Laugh Factory, which has thrived on Sunset Boulevard for 14 years. I was not contacted regarding "Stand-Up Crashes Into '90s Reality" (Jan. 2). When Rick VanderKnyff writes that "nationally, club attendance has fallen sharply at even the prestige venues," I wonder which clubs he is talking about. The Laugh Factory attendance in Hollywood was up 20%, and the Laugh Factory recently opened in Memphis has performed at capacity. Additionally, when VanderKnyff says that "most" local comedy clubs bring in comics for one week, it would be helpful to know which clubs actually do that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spending Thanksgiving broke or alone is no joke. Jamie Masada, a comedian turned nightclub impresario, remembers how it was. "I was worse than hungry," Masada said. "I had no family, nowhere to go. And I swore that if I made it, I would give some back."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1999 | EDGAR SANDOVAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angelenos who ventured to the Laugh Factory on Thursday got more than a laugh. In addition to healthy helpings of humor, they were treated to ample portions of hospitality and a Thanksgiving meal with all the fixings. For nearly 20 years, the comedy club's owner, Jamie Masada has invited the homeless, plus comedians and actors awaiting their big break, to celebrate turkey day with him. Thursday, a smiling Masada once again stood in front of the main door and welcomed visitors.
MAGAZINE
December 6, 1998 | Dave Gardetta
It's a languid fall afternoon, and Jamie Masada is doing what he is best at--parting the waters to lead a struggling comedian to the promised land. Try to imagine Michael Eisner agonizing over the fate of every entertainer yearning to join the Disney family and you begin to understand that Masada, owner of the Laugh Factory on Sunset Boulevard, is an Industry aberration.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1997
I very much enjoyed your article on up-and-coming people to watch for in 1997 (Jan. 5). As a volunteer to a variety of Jewish organizations, I can give you another perspective of Jamie Masada of the Laugh Factory. Whenever any of the organizations contact him for use of his club or for charitable donations, he has never turned us away. He is the most kind businessman I have ever encountered. I wish the best for him in 1997 and beyond. HARRY ROSENFELD Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1994 | CHUCK CRISAFULLI
"I don't ever like to talk about what I've done for successful comedians," says Laugh Factory proprietor Jamie Masada. "I can only talk about what they've done for me. Comedians have made me what I am, and without them I'd be nobody." Masada plunged into the Hollywood comedy scene in 1974, a 14-year-old Israeli emigre traveling without family, without much money, and with oversized dreams of stand-up stardom.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1993
I am the owner of the Laugh Factory, which has thrived on Sunset Boulevard for 14 years. I was not contacted regarding "Stand-Up Crashes Into '90s Reality" (Jan. 2). When Rick VanderKnyff writes that "nationally, club attendance has fallen sharply at even the prestige venues," I wonder which clubs he is talking about. The Laugh Factory attendance in Hollywood was up 20%, and the Laugh Factory recently opened in Memphis has performed at capacity. Additionally, when VanderKnyff says that "most" local comedy clubs bring in comics for one week, it would be helpful to know which clubs actually do that.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Joining Together: Laugh Factory owner Jamie Masada, who in the past has provided free Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners at his establishment for entertainment industry people who are new to Los Angeles and have no family here, now is going to provide Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur services. Masada says "no money, and no tickets" are required for the services on Monday and on Oct. 6-7, but an RSVP is essential.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spending Thanksgiving broke or alone is no joke. Jamie Masada, a comedian turned nightclub impresario, remembers how it was. "I was worse than hungry," Masada said. "I had no family, nowhere to go. And I swore that if I made it, I would give some back."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
"The recession's come to Washington. Two senators just got laid off. We're running the country with 98 senators instead of 100." Jamie Masada confesses that he stole the joke from Jay Leno, who still drops in to perform at Masada's Laugh Factory from time to time, despite Leno's "Tonight Show" success. Masada survived the recession of 1981-82 by maintaining such loyalties and alliances and he expects to survive the recession of 1991 the same way.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1990 | DENNIS McDOUGAL
"The recession's come to Washington. Two senators just got laid off. We're running the country with 98 senators instead of 100." Jamie Masada confesses that he stole the joke from Jay Leno, who still drops in to perform at Masada's Laugh Factory from time to time, despite Leno's "Tonight Show" success. Masada survived the recession of 1981-82 by maintaining such loyalties and alliances and he expects to survive the recession of 1991 the same way.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1990 | From United Press International
Comedy Club Owner Files Counterclaims: The owner of "The Laugh Factory" comedy club has filed counterclaims of copyright infringement and breach of confidence against comedian Vic Dunlop and his associate, David Miller, over a movie script. Jamie Masada accused Dunlop and Miller of illegally attempting to market a movie idea derived from Masada's script "The Comedy College." The counterclaims were in response to a suit that Dunlop and Miller filed against Masada.
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