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Jamie Scott Enyart

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1996 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles man was awarded $450,600 Thursday by a Superior Court jury that found the city negligent for failing to return photographs that police confiscated after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. The verdict was a vindication for Jamie Scott Enyart, 43, a Hollywood special effects artist, who called his eight-year struggle for compensation a classic match of "David versus Goliath."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1996 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles man was awarded $450,600 Thursday by a Superior Court jury that found the city negligent for failing to return photographs that police confiscated after the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy. The verdict was a vindication for Jamie Scott Enyart, 43, a Hollywood special effects artist, who called his eight-year struggle for compensation a classic match of "David versus Goliath."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | EMI ENDO and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The negatives of some photographs taken in the moments surrounding the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy are missing. That is not a matter of debate. But almost everything else about the pictures is. Did they show the crucial seconds when bullets felled the presidential candidate in a pantry at the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, as claimed by the photographer, Jamie Scott Enyart? Or did they show nothing of the assassination, as alleged by the city attorney's office?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
Attorney Skip Miller paces around the courtroom with the quick, spare movements of a cat, an unobtrusive but dominating presence as he defends the city of Los Angeles in a lawsuit that is part of the tangled legacy of Robert Kennedy's 1968 assassination. Suing the city for $2 million is Scott Enyart, who says the Los Angeles Police Department confiscated, and then lost, pictures he took of the assassination while on assignment for the Fairfax High School newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | EMI ENDO and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The negatives of some photographs taken in the moments surrounding the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy are missing. That is not a matter of debate. But almost everything else about the pictures is. Did they show the crucial seconds when bullets felled the presidential candidate in a pantry at the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, as claimed by the photographer, Jamie Scott Enyart? Or did they show nothing of the assassination, as alleged by the city attorney's office?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1996 | BILL BOYARSKY
Attorney Skip Miller paces around the courtroom with the quick, spare movements of a cat, an unobtrusive but dominating presence as he defends the city of Los Angeles in a lawsuit that is part of the tangled legacy of Robert Kennedy's 1968 assassination. Suing the city for $2 million is Scott Enyart, who says the Los Angeles Police Department confiscated, and then lost, pictures he took of the assassination while on assignment for the Fairfax High School newspaper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Louis "Skip" Miller, known as one of the most hard-nosed and aggressive attorneys in Los Angeles, is often hired to defend the city and its Police Department from accusations of wrongdoing. But did he engage in wrongdoing himself--possibly tampering with a jury--in a high-profile case involving missing photos of the Robert F. Kennedy assassination?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | EMI ENDO and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The negatives of some photographs taken in the moments surrounding the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy are missing. That is not a matter of debate. But almost everything else about the pictures is. Did they show the crucial seconds when bullets felled the presidential candidate in a pantry at the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, as claimed by the photographer, Jamie Scott Enyart? Or did they show nothing of the assassination, as alleged by the city attorney's office?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996 | EMI ENDO and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The negatives of some photographs taken in the moments surrounding the assassination of Robert F. Kennedy are missing. That is not a matter of debate. But almost everything else about the pictures is. Did they show the crucial seconds when bullets felled the presidential candidate in a pantry at the Ambassador Hotel on June 5, 1968, as claimed by the photographer, Jamie Scott Enyart? Or did they show nothing of the assassination, as alleged by the city attorney's office?
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