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May 6, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the snow-capped Himalayas, beside the tourist houseboats that ring Kashmir's legendary Nagin Lake, Prof. Mohammed Yusuf watched in disbelief last week as Indian soldiers beat his only son. "At least 200 of them fell on him and started beating on him with their fists and sticks," the 70-year-old retired school principal said, his voice cracking. "I thought he was dead. But I threw myself on him to save his head. I took two strokes on my back before they pulled me off.
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NEWS
May 6, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the shadow of the snow-capped Himalayas, beside the tourist houseboats that ring Kashmir's legendary Nagin Lake, Prof. Mohammed Yusuf watched in disbelief last week as Indian soldiers beat his only son. "At least 200 of them fell on him and started beating on him with their fists and sticks," the 70-year-old retired school principal said, his voice cracking. "I thought he was dead. But I threw myself on him to save his head. I took two strokes on my back before they pulled me off.
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NEWS
February 11, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Eight bombs exploded in Srinagar, the summer capital of India's Jammu and Kashmir state, and authorities stepped up security on the eve of the anniversary of an extremist leader's execution. Police said Srinagar will be under curfew through today, the sixth anniversary of the death of Mohammed Maqbool Butt, a leader of the Jammu and Kashmir Liberation Front, which has campaigned against Indian rule.
NEWS
March 24, 1992
Security forces on both sides of the disputed Indo-Pakistani border region of Jammu and Kashmir have been placed on full alert for today's scheduled suicide charge by Muslim militants, whose armed struggle to create a separate state in the Himalayan region already has left nearly 2,000 dead in two years.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | From Associated Press
Muslim militants on Wednesday freed an Israeli tourist they held hostage for nearly a week in battle-torn Kashmir. Yair Yitzhaki was handed over to three journalists at an undisclosed location in Srinagar, the capital of Kashmir, a spokesman for the militants said. An Israeli official in New Delhi confirmed Yitzhaki was released and is in good health.
NEWS
March 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
Separatist rebels barricaded inside Kashmir's holiest shrine since Sunday left the building Tuesday, and police allowed them safe passage to their nearby headquarters, authorities said. The rebels' retreat helped defuse a crisis that had threatened to damage the Hazratbal mosque in Srinagar, which Kashmiri Muslims believe contains a hair of the Prophet Muhammad. The government feared widespread violence if the white marble shrine was damaged.
NEWS
April 11, 1990 | From Reuters
Muslim Kashmiri militants fighting for secession from India have killed all three hostages they took in an effort to free colleagues from jail, police said today. The secessionists killed one hostage, H. L. Khera, the manager of a state-run machine tools factory, in broad daylight in front of Indian Kashmir's heavily guarded police headquarters Tuesday afternoon. Police said the bodies of the two others were found dumped in a Srinagar suburb late Tuesday night.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a furious firefight that killed at least 11 people at Kashmir's holiest site, Indian forces and separatist militants were locked in a tense standoff at the shrine Monday. Indian troops and police surrounded the domed mosque of white marble on the shore of Dal Lake, while official sources reported that about a dozen armed separatists were holed up inside. Daylong efforts to persuade the guerrillas to come out failed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1990
Bharat Wariavwalla, in his article "Kashmir Violence Reignites India-Pakistan Tensions" (Opinion, Feb. 11), has made a number of unfounded allegations against Pakistan. To begin with, the writer states that "the union of predominantly Muslim Kashmir with India is regarded by Indians as symbolizing the unity of their . . . country." This makes it sound like a voluntary union which it is not: The Kashmir valley continues to be occupied by Indian troops, and its absorption into the Indian union is illegal.
NEWS
March 27, 1996 | From Associated Press
Separatist rebels barricaded inside Kashmir's holiest shrine since Sunday left the building Tuesday, and police allowed them safe passage to their nearby headquarters, authorities said. The rebels' retreat helped defuse a crisis that had threatened to damage the Hazratbal mosque in Srinagar, which Kashmiri Muslims believe contains a hair of the Prophet Muhammad. The government feared widespread violence if the white marble shrine was damaged.
OPINION
February 11, 1990 | Bharat Wariavwalla, Bharat Wariavwalla is senior fellow at the Center for the Study of Developing Societies
Unrest in the valley of Kashmir is serious news for India. Losing Kashmir would threaten India's security vis-a-vis Pakistan. Most important, India's internal order would be imperiled. The union of predominantly Muslim Kashmir with India is regarded by Indians as symbolizing the unity of their multireligious and multiethnic country.
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