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Jamul Indians

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NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Jamul Indians say they plan to build a $100-million high-rise hotel and casino that would cover nearly five of their reservation's six acres. The tribe would move the homes of its 56 members onto an adjacent parcel of land to make way for the casino and eventually make that property part of an expanded reservation. The casino plan is the fourth announced in the region since 11 local tribes signed gambling compacts with Gov. Gray Davis in September.
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NEWS
August 20, 2000 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jamul Indians may be one of the state's smallest tribes, but they have big plans for a tiny six-acre reservation in the dry, brush-covered hills of eastern San Diego County. In the next year, the 56-member tribe plans to build a multistory casino on four acres of its reservation land.
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NEWS
August 20, 2000 | TRACY WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jamul Indians may be one of the state's smallest tribes, but they have big plans for a tiny six-acre reservation in the dry, brush-covered hills of eastern San Diego County. In the next year, the 56-member tribe plans to build a multistory casino on four acres of its reservation land.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Jamul Indians say they plan to build a $100-million high-rise hotel and casino that would cover nearly five of their reservation's six acres. The tribe would move the homes of its 56 members onto an adjacent parcel of land to make way for the casino and eventually make that property part of an expanded reservation. The casino plan is the fourth announced in the region since 11 local tribes signed gambling compacts with Gov. Gray Davis in September.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1986 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
Move over, bingo; here comes the newest promise of quick bucks for Indians: hi-ball, lo-ball, pan and pai gow poker. A card room has quietly opened on the Rincon Indian Reservation here, bringing with it the promise that the reservation will make $25,000 a month in new revenue as gamblers ply their trade 24 hours a day, seven days a week in this bucolic countryside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1986 | TOM GORMAN, Times Staff Writer
Move over, bingo, here comes the newest promise of quick bucks for Indians: hi-ball, lo-ball, pan and pai gow poker. A card room has quietly opened on the Rincon Indian Reservation here, bringing with it the promise that the reservation will make $25,000 a month in new revenue as gamblers ply their trade 24 hours a day, seven days a week in this bucolic countryside.
MAGAZINE
February 16, 2003 | Fred Dickey, Fred Dickey last wrote for the magazine about Levi Strauss.
It's a beautiful Sunday evening in December on the edge of Temecula. Malls nearby are packed with customers, and so is a new $262-million gambling casino and resort owned by the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Mission Indians. A few years ago, California's Indian casinos were shabby and claustrophobic. But this one wouldn't be out of place on the Las Vegas Strip.
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