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Jan A P Kaczmarek

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2006 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
TRADITIONALLY, going Hollywood has meant repudiating one's past in favor of a glitzier future. But for Jan A.P. Kaczmarek, winner of an Academy Award last February for his score for "Finding Neverland," it's become a way to go home again -- on his terms. Friday at Royce Hall, a concert titled "Journey to Light" will explore the post-Romantic concert and film music of the Polish-born Kaczmarek, 52.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 2006 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
TRADITIONALLY, going Hollywood has meant repudiating one's past in favor of a glitzier future. But for Jan A.P. Kaczmarek, winner of an Academy Award last February for his score for "Finding Neverland," it's become a way to go home again -- on his terms. Friday at Royce Hall, a concert titled "Journey to Light" will explore the post-Romantic concert and film music of the Polish-born Kaczmarek, 52.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2005
BEST PICTURE "Million Dollar Baby" ACTOR Jamie Foxx "Ray" ACTRESS Hilary Swank "Million Dollar Baby" SUPPORTING ACTOR Morgan Freeman "Million Dollar Baby" SUPPORTING ACTRESS Cate Blanchett "The Aviator" DIRECTOR Clint Eastwood "Million Dollar Baby" ADAPTED SCREENPLAY Alexander Payne and Jim Taylor "Sideways" ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY Charlie Kaufman (screenplay); Kaufman, Michel Gondry and Pierre Bismuth (story) "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" ANIMATED FEATURE FILM "The Incredibles" FOREIGN
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2012 | By Alex Pham
Warner/Chappell, the music publishing arm of Warner Music Group, has acquired the copyrights of film scores from hundreds of Miramax movies, including "Good Will Hunting," "The Cider House Rules," "Gangs of New York" and "Finding Neverland. " Terms of the deal, announced Tuesday morning, were not disclosed. The acquisition includes the publishing rights as well as the master recordings of scores in Miramax's entire catalog of more than 700 films. "The digital age continues to create new ways for music to be licensed, whether it's on YouTube, games or TV shows," Cameron Strang, chairman of Warner/Chappell, said in an interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Whenever a play deals with important concepts, especially concepts of a political nature, a terrible trap lurks in the gloom. Call it awe. It is the danger of overdoing the respect. That danger was always there in Ariel Dorfman's "Widows." It was in his 1978 novel, written from the heart, but set in Greece in an abortive attempt to disguise the identity of the author and the fact that it was about the desaparecidos ("disappeared") in his native Chile during the Pinochet regime.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Bliss" is an earnest yet half-baked message movie about how the source of sexual dysfunction in marriage can be caused by a repressed memory of childhood incest. That this is obviously a very serious, tricky subject doesn't excuse writer-director Lance Young from turning out so academic and uneven a film. This is yet another of those blah Canadian movies that provide such a contrast to the venturesome work of two north-of-the-border mavericks, Atom Egoyan and David Cronenberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Lost Souls" is lost all right, a dreary tale of supernatural horror featuring Winona Ryder doing battle with Satan. Like her most recent previous film, "Autumn in New York," an old-fashioned tear-jerker that opened sans press previews, "Lost Souls" is set in Manhattan, ravishingly photographed in virtual sepia. Maybe the talented Ryder should head back to California about now and steer clear of genre material for a while.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1990 | CATHY CURTIS
A fearless clash of cultures at night-owl hours, "The 13th Hour: A Celebration of Performance" at the Taper, Too (a.k.a. John Anson Ford Theatre) in Hollywood features five performance groups of varying sparkle and ability. At its best, the event, which opened Thursday and continues through tonight offers polished ensemble work, dead-on commentary, wry humor and a tangy blend of poetry and percussion. At its worst, "The 13th Hour" is pretentious, long-winded and uninspired.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has recently feted such legendary Oscar-winning composers as Franz Waxman and Miklós Rózsa, who began making their marks in the 1930s. But with its upcoming seminar series, "The Music Sound Track," the organization is examining the present and the future of film composition. The three-evening program at the Linwood Dunn Theater examines the musical scoring process through the eyes of several of today's best-known composers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Polish filmmakers recently have been making new versions of their country's beloved 19th century novels, none more cherished than those by Henryk Sienkiewicz. The veteran Jerzy Kawalerowicz, who turns 80 this year, has completed an elaborate version of Sienkiewicz's most famous work, "Quo Vadis," said to be Poland's biggest movie ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
The 5,800 or so members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences care about two things: impeccable craftsmanship and heart-rending emotion. They respect the former, but they out and out love the latter. Which is how "The Aviator" won five Academy Awards but "Million Dollar Baby" walked off with four of the biggest ones, including best director and best picture.
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