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Jan Berenstain

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April 13, 1986 | KRISTIANA GREGORY
What greater opportunity for parents to go overboard than at their child's birthday? Nothing's too good for Junior, but it might be too much as we learn from those funny Berenstain Bears of the pink-trimmed tree house who've entertained preschoolers for years with their mishaps. Now Mama and Papa Bear outdo themselves when their daughter turns 6 and they mastermind a bash, her very first party. And bash it is with ponies, a merry-go-round, gifts, games (Spin the Bottle for 6-year-olds ?
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BOOKS
April 13, 1986 | KRISTIANA GREGORY
What greater opportunity for parents to go overboard than at their child's birthday? Nothing's too good for Junior, but it might be too much as we learn from those funny Berenstain Bears of the pink-trimmed tree house who've entertained preschoolers for years with their mishaps. Now Mama and Papa Bear outdo themselves when their daughter turns 6 and they mastermind a bash, her very first party. And bash it is with ponies, a merry-go-round, gifts, games (Spin the Bottle for 6-year-olds ?
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2005 | Paul Farhi, Washington Post
Sit down, kids, Papa has some bad news. Stan Berenstain, the man who created the Berenstain Bears children's books with his wife, Jan, has died at the age of 82. Dying is bad, children, because people miss the deceased and feel sad. OK, now go to bed. And that, in effect, is Stan Berenstain's legacy: The retailing of simple moral declarations, pat and amusing lessons for the "Sesame Street" set, all dressed up with colorful ready-for-Saturday-morning-TV cartoons.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2008
"Charlie Bone and the Time Twister" Jenny Nimmo This is a magical book about a boy named Charlie Bone and his magically endowed friends. Each of them have a special power. Charlie and his friends meet Henry Yewbeam, a person thrown through time from 1916. Trouble follows Henry, and people are after him to harm him. He needs the help of Charlie and his friends. Can Charlie and his friends save Henry before it's too late? Read the book to find out.
NEWS
August 30, 1990
For the average child, the start of the school year is as significant an event as life can offer. Lazy summer days suddenly yield to rigid schedules, life's geographical center shifts from home to the classroom, and the awkward social drama that had slowed during summer's long recess again becomes fast-paced and rich. It can be a lot of fun. And it can be stressful. "Kids are entering an unknown situation and they're trying to figure out what the rules are.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | CAROL DEEGAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Get ready to pull the covers over your head. It's time for Halloween--and all its spooky, scary and ghost-filled incarnations. For spine-tingling stories sure to thrill Halloween storytellers everywhere, there's Alvin Schwartz's "Scary Stories 3: More Tales to Chill Your Bones," with black-and-white drawings by illustrator Stephen Gammell. Schwartz, author of "Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark" and "More Scary Stories," has included 25 new stories in this collection (HarperCollins, $13.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1998 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Real life doesn't stop for tah-dahs. Words and gestures are exchanged, emotions flare and fade, fear and laughter bubble up and float away. Rarely do we interrupt their flow just to acknowledge the roar of the crowd. Cirque Eloize (pronounced el-WAH) follows a similar premise. In its new show, "Excentricus," running through Saturday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre, the 5-year-old Canadian troupe uses the language of circus arts to portray little joys and heartbreaks of human interaction.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Without Sterling Lord, there would be no Jack Kerouac - not Kerouac as we know him, anyway, the writer who introduced the Beat Generation. Lord was a former magazine editor and fledgling literary agent working in a basement apartment in New York when Kerouac walked in, handsome and scruffy, "On the Road" manuscript stuffed in his backpack. It took Lord four years and canny magazine placements to land Kerouac a book deal, but he persevered, even ignoring Kerouac's pleas to give up. "When I read the manuscript, I knew this was a very interesting voice and very interesting writer, and he should be heard," Lord says from his home in Manhattan.
NEWS
June 10, 1994 | JOYCE SUNILA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Joyce Sunila writes regularly for The Times
It's summer reading season again, time for parents to head for libraries and bookstores for the usual stack of childhood favorites. For certain grown- ups--those who whiled away their own youths dreaming over books--the prospect of sharing remembered tomes with kids is delightful. "Eloise," "Charlotte's Web," "Treasure Island"--whatever ignited the love of reading in parents will probably leap to mind as they shop for children's summer fare. Their youngsters, however, may have other ideas.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; R. Daniel Foster writes regularly for The Times
When Candee Messmore took her son Spenser to the dentist when he was 2, the examination nev er moved beyond Spenser's clenched mouth. "The dentist's attitude was that my son needed to be big and sit in the chair alone, without me there," said Messmore, who lives in Granada Hills. "The whole experience started so negatively that he remembered it and referred to it for a whole year." Messmore's story, say experts, is not uncommon, and its impact can be far-reaching.
NEWS
August 26, 1994 | ADRIENNE WIGDORTZ ANDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Adrienne Anderson is an Agoura writer.
Josh Noland, 10, hasn't started school yet but already worries about the prospect. "I'm nervous that kids won't play with me because I'm new," he recently admitted as he toured Germain Street Elementary School in Chatsworth, where he'll enroll next month. He worries partly, he said, because he's transferring from a private school, and he has heard that public-school students fight a lot.
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