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Jan Burke

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
Bloodlines An Irene Kelly Novel Jan Burke Simon & Schuster: 468 pp., $25 * Jan BURKE'S ambitious new Irene Kelly mystery spans more than 60 years of Southern California history, but it focuses on one night in 1958 when reporter Jack Corrigan awakens after a savage beating to see -- or to think he sees -- a car being buried in a field. That same night, four members of a wealthy family vanish at sea, their infant heir is kidnapped and the baby's nursemaid is slain.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2005 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
Bloodlines An Irene Kelly Novel Jan Burke Simon & Schuster: 468 pp., $25 * Jan BURKE'S ambitious new Irene Kelly mystery spans more than 60 years of Southern California history, but it focuses on one night in 1958 when reporter Jack Corrigan awakens after a savage beating to see -- or to think he sees -- a car being buried in a field. That same night, four members of a wealthy family vanish at sea, their infant heir is kidnapped and the baby's nursemaid is slain.
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BOOKS
March 23, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
For Tim Green, the legal system is a game of chance. At the whim of a judge or jury, pain, suffering and bereavement become less significant than legal loopholes and rules of evidence twisted by shysters, while violent predators roam free to prey on the innocent again and again. "The Fifth Angel" presents a case for the retribution that our so-called justice system fails to visit upon sordid destroyers of lives.
BOOKS
March 23, 2003 | Eugen Weber, Eugen Weber is a contributing writer to Book Review.
For Tim Green, the legal system is a game of chance. At the whim of a judge or jury, pain, suffering and bereavement become less significant than legal loopholes and rules of evidence twisted by shysters, while violent predators roam free to prey on the innocent again and again. "The Fifth Angel" presents a case for the retribution that our so-called justice system fails to visit upon sordid destroyers of lives.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Jan Burke was sitting in a small club in West L.A. when a group of "good-sized folks" got up to dance. After watching them a few seconds Burke turned to her husband, Tim, and said, "I just thought of the best first line for a novel." The line was, "He loved to watch fat women dance."
BOOKS
February 18, 1996 | DICK LOCHTE
Last year, Janet Evanovich's wild and woolly "One for the Money" introduced a new heroine for our times, the naive but fiercely determined novice bounty hunter Stephanie Plum. Stephanie, who can give Kinsey Millhone and V.I. Warshawski lessons in attitude--she is after all, from New Jersey--won the hearts of critics and readers alike with her smart mouth and hard-boiled manner, neither of which quite manage to mask her underlying vulnerability. She returns in the new Two for the Dough, just as outwardly tough and just as self-doubting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1996 | ALAN EYERLY
A campaign to create a $1-million endowment for the city library system will kick off April 14 with a luncheon featuring three Southern California mystery writers. The nonprofit Anaheim Public Library Foundation, formed in 1995, hopes to establish a permanent endowment by 2002 for buying books and other reading materials, and securing funding to replace or remodel the main city library.
NEWS
April 28, 1996
In your April 2 story about the spring edition of Manuscripts at Newport Beach Central Library, the program's co-chairs portray their twice-a-year series as "an alternative to the celebrity-oriented monthly Round Table West author luncheons at the Balboa Bay Club." We are always delighted to hear about programs such as the library's, with which we share a common cause to inspire young people to read more, encourage people to write and foster an appreciation to the literary arts. Frankly, the literary arts need all the help they can get today!
BOOKS
February 18, 1996 | DICK LOCHTE
Last year, Janet Evanovich's wild and woolly "One for the Money" introduced a new heroine for our times, the naive but fiercely determined novice bounty hunter Stephanie Plum. Stephanie, who can give Kinsey Millhone and V.I. Warshawski lessons in attitude--she is after all, from New Jersey--won the hearts of critics and readers alike with her smart mouth and hard-boiled manner, neither of which quite manage to mask her underlying vulnerability. She returns in the new Two for the Dough, just as outwardly tough and just as self-doubting.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three years ago, Jan Burke was sitting in a small club in West L.A. when a group of "good-sized folks" got up to dance. After watching them a few seconds Burke turned to her husband, Tim, and said, "I just thought of the best first line for a novel." The line was, "He loved to watch fat women dance."
BOOKS
March 23, 1997
The author lineup is growing for the second annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books, to be held April 19 and 20 on the UCLA campus. About 60 events are scheduled on a variety of topics such as mysteries, romance, poetry, New Age, biography and environmentalism. There will also be a wide variety of children's programs, including publishers' and booksellers' booths and book signings. All events are free to the public.
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