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Jan Carnogursky

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NEWS
December 12, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the pace of political change has been rapid here, for no one has it been faster than for 45-year-old Jan Carnogursky, a deputy prime minister in the new government. In the space of only two weeks, the Slovak lawyer has moved from dissident to defendant to government minister. For him, life began to turn on a Sunday evening two weeks ago in his Bratislava prison cell after he had been pardoned by Gustav Husak, then the nation's president.
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NEWS
December 12, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the pace of political change has been rapid here, for no one has it been faster than for 45-year-old Jan Carnogursky, a deputy prime minister in the new government. In the space of only two weeks, the Slovak lawyer has moved from dissident to defendant to government minister. For him, life began to turn on a Sunday evening two weeks ago in his Bratislava prison cell after he had been pardoned by Gustav Husak, then the nation's president.
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NEWS
December 9, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation of Czechoslovakia stood on the verge of its first non-Communist government in more than 40 years Friday as intense negotiations finally broke the party's efforts to retain power. "A new coalition will be formed," declared Communist Politburo member Vasil Mohorita, who represented his party at the talks. Echoed Vaclav Klaus, a negotiator from the opposition group Civic Forum: "We agreed on almost everything. You'll hear extraordinary things."
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three weeks after it was born, this nation's opposition of students and political amateurs on Saturday won its revolution. The victory was sweeping: -- In a new government to be formally announced today, the opposition will hold several key posts, including two deputy premierships and the portfolios of foreign affairs and economic affairs. -- While the prime ministership remains in Communist hands, the new government pushed the Communist Party into a minority role.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Three weeks after it was born, this nation's opposition of students and political amateurs on Saturday won its revolution. The victory was sweeping: -- In a new government to be formally announced today, the opposition will hold several key posts, including two deputy premierships and the portfolios of foreign affairs and economic affairs. -- While the prime ministership remains in Communist hands, the new government pushed the Communist Party into a minority role.
NEWS
November 25, 1989
August 22--Authorities arrest 370 people for taking part in a demonstration marking the 21st anniversary of the Soviet-led invasion that crushed the "Prague Spring" reform movement. October 27--Police in Prague round up major dissidents, including Vaclav Havel, the country's most famous playwright and founder of Charter 77 human rights group. October 28--Government uses heavily armed police to crush Prague demonstration demanding freedom and end to communism.
OPINION
June 16, 1991 | ROGER SCRUTON, Roger Scruton is editor of the Salisbury Review, a conservative magazine in London
Why have liberals tolerated communists, while execrating fascists and Nazis, whose behavior is so similar? Why did Hannah Arendt, in "Origins of Totalitarianism," lay the whole blame on 19th-Century nationalists, and why did she not notice Lenin, still less his mentor Karl Marx?
NEWS
December 17, 1989
As Trotsky or Mao or Che Guevara might have said in another context, the struggle continues. Tadeusz Mazowiecki, after four months as the first non-Communist prime minister of Poland, looks as tired as he did the day he told Lech Walesa he would take the job. Walesa went to Washington and became one of three foreigners who were not heads of state to have addressed a joint session of Congress. He was given a standing ovation.
NEWS
December 11, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few revolutionaries in history have managed to accomplish what the Czechoslovak opposition pulled off in just three weeks: topple an entrenched, repressive regime with nothing more violent than a firm shove. But as thousands gathered in the city's main Wenceslas Square on Sunday to hear Civic Forum leaders praise the glory of their success, an entirely new set of challenges loomed on the horizon.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Minister Miroslav Vacek announced Friday that Czechoslovakia will begin immediately to reduce the size of its army and remove the fortifications along its border with West Germany. "The army does not need these barriers for the defense of our country," Gen. Vacek said at a press conference. Vacek declined to give specific figures on the extent of the reduction planned for the military. Present strength is put at roughly 200,000.
NEWS
December 9, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation of Czechoslovakia stood on the verge of its first non-Communist government in more than 40 years Friday as intense negotiations finally broke the party's efforts to retain power. "A new coalition will be formed," declared Communist Politburo member Vasil Mohorita, who represented his party at the talks. Echoed Vaclav Klaus, a negotiator from the opposition group Civic Forum: "We agreed on almost everything. You'll hear extraordinary things."
NEWS
December 19, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than a week, this has been a city in celebration, but in recent days the festivities have taken on a strong undertone of nervousness. On Monday, for example, the Ministry of Defense felt compelled to issue a nationally broadcast statement denying widespread rumors of an impending coup. An "entirely irresponsible leaflet campaign," centering on the provincial city of Brno, has talked about a coup in an attempt "to create panic," Defense Ministry spokesman Col. Stanislav Pohorel said.
OPINION
January 14, 1990 | Karel Kovanda, Karel Kovanda has just returned from his second trip to Czechoslovakia since the November revolution
In the second month of what has been dubbed Czechoslovakia's "velvet revolution," the action, though off the streets, is no less contentious. Civic Forum has won several important battles. But the Communists have not surrendered. In various mutations, they are regrouping to mount an electoral challenge that could frustrate the plans of the country's new leaders. The People's Militia, the Communist Party's private security force since 1948, has been disarmed and disbanded.
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