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Jan Crouch

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Hannah Fry
Paul Crouch Sr., founder and president of the Trinity Broadcasting Network, has been hospitalized near Dallas after experiencing shortness of breath. He was taken to the hospital Oct. 22 and was listed as being in stable condition, according to a TBN spokesman. Over the last decade, Crouch has been treated for a chronic heart condition and last year he received a pacemaker, according to a news release. "Everyone associated with TBN, and especially Jan and the Crouch family, want to express their deep and sincere appreciation for the countless prayers and expressions of support and encouragement offered by TBN's many friends and partners all over the world," the news release stated.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Hannah Fry
Paul Crouch Sr., founder and president of the Trinity Broadcasting Network, has been hospitalized near Dallas after experiencing shortness of breath. He was taken to the hospital Oct. 22 and was listed as being in stable condition, according to a TBN spokesman. Over the last decade, Crouch has been treated for a chronic heart condition and last year he received a pacemaker, according to a news release. "Everyone associated with TBN, and especially Jan and the Crouch family, want to express their deep and sincere appreciation for the countless prayers and expressions of support and encouragement offered by TBN's many friends and partners all over the world," the news release stated.
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NEWS
November 9, 1992 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During its 72 years as a Southern California institution, the Hollywood Bowl Easter Sunrise Service has overcome rainstorms, protest demonstrations and financial problems. But it now faces a struggle that supporters fear it may not survive. City officials have ordered the service to stop soliciting money. Once-generous donors have threatened it with lawsuits.
NEWS
November 9, 1992 | RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During its 72 years as a Southern California institution, the Hollywood Bowl Easter Sunrise Service has overcome rainstorms, protest demonstrations and financial problems. But it now faces a struggle that supporters fear it may not survive. City officials have ordered the service to stop soliciting money. Once-generous donors have threatened it with lawsuits.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The programs are beamed around the clock from a nondescript studio complex in an Orange County industrial park. Distributed in the United States through a network larger than that controlled by any other Christian evangelist, the signals go overseas, too, carrying a stern anti-communist message to Central America and encouragement for the government of South Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988 | STANLEY O. WILLIFORD
When Paul and Jan Crouch started Trinity Broadcasting in Santa Ana in 1973, they had no idea that the then-tiny Christian network would someday stretch nationwide. But in the intervening 15 years it has done that and more. Today it is an international network, with stations in South Africa, the Caribbean, Europe and Central America. "About two years ago we bought Johnny Carson's station in Albuquerque, Channel 23," Paul Crouch said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The worldwide broadcasting empire of Tustin televangelist Paul F. Crouch gets its income from weeklong fund-raising appeals, called "Praise-a-Thons," that raise tens of millions of dollars and are among the more lucrative such programs on U.S. television.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
As the sun was setting one day last spring in the San Joaquin Valley, the Rev. Paul F. Crouch, founder and president of the Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, began to preach his gospel of globalism. Crouch told the congregation in a sweltering sanctuary in rural Selma about TBN's plans to build a television station in Finland to broadcast into the Soviet Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The spectacular growth of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network has been aided in part by liberal interpretation of a federal policy designed to promote minority broadcast ownership, a review of federal documents shows. For years, under Federal Communications Commission rules aimed at restraining the power of the major commercial networks, only seven full-power commercial television stations could be owned by a single individual, group or company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2004 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
Televangelist Paul Crouch, founder of the world's largest Christian broadcasting network, has waged a fierce legal battle to prevent a former employee from publicizing allegations that he and Crouch had a sexual encounter eight years ago. Crouch, 70, is the president of Trinity Broadcasting Network, based in Orange County, whose Christian programming reaches millions of viewers around the world via satellite, cable and broadcast stations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The worldwide broadcasting empire of Tustin televangelist Paul F. Crouch gets its income from weeklong fund-raising appeals, called "Praise-a-Thons," that raise tens of millions of dollars and are among the more lucrative such programs on U.S. television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The spectacular growth of Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network has been aided in part by liberal interpretation of a federal policy designed to promote minority broadcast ownership, a review of federal documents shows. For years, under Federal Communications Commission rules aimed at restraining the power of the major commercial networks, only seven full-power commercial television stations could be owned by a single individual, group or company.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
As the sun was setting one day last spring in the San Joaquin Valley, the Rev. Paul F. Crouch, founder and president of the Tustin-based Trinity Broadcasting Network, began to preach his gospel of globalism. Crouch told the congregation in a sweltering sanctuary in rural Selma about TBN's plans to build a television station in Finland to broadcast into the Soviet Union.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
The programs are beamed around the clock from a nondescript studio complex in an Orange County industrial park. Distributed in the United States through a network larger than that controlled by any other Christian evangelist, the signals go overseas, too, carrying a stern anti-communist message to Central America and encouragement for the government of South Africa.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1988 | STANLEY O. WILLIFORD
When Paul and Jan Crouch started Trinity Broadcasting in Santa Ana in 1973, they had no idea that the then-tiny Christian network would someday stretch nationwide. But in the intervening 15 years it has done that and more. Today it is an international network, with stations in South Africa, the Caribbean, Europe and Central America. "About two years ago we bought Johnny Carson's station in Albuquerque, Channel 23," Paul Crouch said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1998
Re "Seeing Is Believing," June 9: Many have apparently been taken in by the false doctrines and glittery facade of Trinity Broadcasting Network. Televangelists Paul and Jan Crouch often brag on their program that they do not represent an "organized religious" movement and are in no way tied to any denomination of value or long-standing. They also brazenly state they do not give account to "man-made government groups" for how they use the funds so generously given to them by their viewers.
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