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Jan Davidson

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BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four technology start-ups financed by entrepreneurs Jan and Bob Davidson have relocated to a Long Beach office building where they share back-office functions. But don't call it an incubator. "They are not looking to make a business of starting companies in order to take them public," said Jack Allewaert, chief executive of Aquirex, the newest of the four ventures. The move allows the companies to save money. They share management information system functions and telephone services.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 2000 | DENISE GELLENE and MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Four technology start-ups financed by entrepreneurs Jan and Bob Davidson have relocated to a Long Beach office building where they share back-office functions. But don't call it an incubator. "They are not looking to make a business of starting companies in order to take them public," said Jack Allewaert, chief executive of Aquirex, the newest of the four ventures. The move allows the companies to save money. They share management information system functions and telephone services.
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BUSINESS
October 14, 1998 | CYNDIA ZWAHLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been a year of upheaval for Jan Davidson, well known as the former Torrance teacher who created the popular Math Blaster software for kids in 1982 and went on to build a $1-billion educational software company with her husband. The couple sold Davidson & Associates in 1996 to CUC International Inc. for $1.15 billion in stock. The Davidsons, who with the sale became the largest CUC shareholders, continued to work at the company until January 1997.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1998 | CYNDIA ZWAHLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's been a year of upheaval for Jan Davidson, well known as the former Torrance teacher who created the popular Math Blaster software for kids in 1982 and went on to build a $1-billion educational software company with her husband. The couple sold Davidson & Associates in 1996 to CUC International Inc. for $1.15 billion in stock. The Davidsons, who with the sale became the largest CUC shareholders, continued to work at the company until January 1997.
NEWS
August 22, 1994
Twelve years ago, Jan Davidson was exactly where she wanted to be--in a classroom. She had known since age 13--when she began tutoring other children after school--that she wanted to teach. Her home life was on track as well. Davidson and her husband, Bob, were raising three preteen children in Palos Verdes. His career as a corporate executive was on a meteoric climb. But Davidson had a vision that would forever alter their lives: Why not use a home computer to teach kids math?
BUSINESS
October 11, 1998
Get tips that will help your company grow from Kinko's founder Paul Orfalea, teacher-turned-billionaire Jan Davidson, marketing expert Jack Trout and others in a special section Wednesday. Business, Part II.
SPORTS
October 4, 1986
What kind of schedule is it when mighty UCLA plays San Diego State and Cal State Long Beach? Is someone setting them up to be No. 1? Next, they will be playing Carson High School--but maybe not. They might lose. JAN DAVIDSON Woodland Hills
TRAVEL
July 21, 2002
Concerning "May the Road Rise With Volunteers Who Adopt a California Highway" (Her World, July 14): I disagree with Barry Kaufman and Jan Davidson's conclusion about why people trash highways. The reason is obvious, based on their observation of the high percentage of alcoholic beverage containers in the litter. The consequences for littering are much less than those for driving with an open alcohol container, especially if the driver is driving while intoxicated. I noticed the same distribution of litter on the section of U.S. 395 that I help clean.
NEWS
June 20, 1990 | LYNN SIMROSS
Cat lovers, consider Rollmate, a new vinyl cover that keeps your frivolous feline from tearing up the toilet paper or pulling it through the house. Rollmate was invented by a Dan Geller, a San Franciscan who scoured pet stores to find such a product in 1988, when his family got a cat named Tova. "There was nothing out there to help us, so I decided to create a solution," he said. Many cat owners can relate to Geller's plight.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1998
Submit your business questions and they could be answered by keynote speakers at the Los Angeles Times' Small Business Strategies Conference this weekend. Saturday's keynote speakers and their topics: * Kinko's founder Paul Orfalea on how to balance your life with activities other than work. * Business consultant Jack Trout on the need for simple business strategies in an increasingly complicated world.
NEWS
August 22, 1994
Twelve years ago, Jan Davidson was exactly where she wanted to be--in a classroom. She had known since age 13--when she began tutoring other children after school--that she wanted to teach. Her home life was on track as well. Davidson and her husband, Bob, were raising three preteen children in Palos Verdes. His career as a corporate executive was on a meteoric climb. But Davidson had a vision that would forever alter their lives: Why not use a home computer to teach kids math?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2000
Virginia Lorraine Davidson, a retired nurse, died Sunday at her home in Ventura after a lengthy bout with Parkinson's disease. She was 73. She was born Nov. 13, 1926, in Ellsworth, Pa., to George Dewey Calverley and Martha Squires Calverley. Later, she moved from Los Angeles to Ventura County, where she lived for the last 56 years. After graduating from Ventura High School in 1944, she worked as a nurse at Ventura County Hospital until 1958.
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