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Jan De Swart

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January 6, 1993 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan de Swart paid little heed to the mainstream art world during his long and creative life. The Dutch emigre and artist preferred the solitude of Allegro, his hilltop home, where he could sculpt undisturbed. From his workshop marched 60-foot, undulating wood sculptures, Dada-esque mobiles, surreal plastic toys, found-art assemblages and whimsical furniture. Critics struggling to describe it listed influences from Brancusi, Arp, Miro, Picasso and Noguchi.
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January 6, 1993 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan de Swart paid little heed to the mainstream art world during his long and creative life. The Dutch emigre and artist preferred the solitude of Allegro, his hilltop home, where he could sculpt undisturbed. From his workshop marched 60-foot, undulating wood sculptures, Dada-esque mobiles, surreal plastic toys, found-art assemblages and whimsical furniture. Critics struggling to describe it listed influences from Brancusi, Arp, Miro, Picasso and Noguchi.
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April 25, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Jan de Swart, an inventor whose lifelong fascination with the woods and metals he found about him took him into a separate career as an acclaimed and experimental sculptor, has died after suffering a heart attack. He was 79 and died April 15 in Pasadena. Born in Holland, De Swart's basic training came at the hands of a master woodcarver in his native land.
NEWS
April 25, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Jan de Swart, an inventor whose lifelong fascination with the woods and metals he found about him took him into a separate career as an acclaimed and experimental sculptor, has died after suffering a heart attack. He was 79 and died April 15 in Pasadena. Born in Holland, De Swart's basic training came at the hands of a master woodcarver in his native land.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times
If there were ever sculptures that trumpeted the delight their creator had in making them, it is the wood, metal and plastic artworks of Dutch-born artist and inventor Jan de Swart (1908-1987). They come with names like "Magic Cube," "Wizard's Workplace" and "Tunisian Evening." Hidden drawers emerge from the sensuous curves of wood boxes. Doors of small cabinets open to reveal sleek interior carvings, intriguing partitions, or possibly a piece of jewelry.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | BOB POOL, Times Staff Writer
Katharine Diemert knew she had stumbled across a jewel the first time she spied the tiny cottage nestled in an oak grove next to a bubbling Calabasas stream. Diemert didn't learn just how precious her find was, however, until she bought the picturesque house last year and moved in. When she peeked into its small attic to look for storage space, she found a cardboard box hidden beneath the eaves. The box contained a family of carefully detailed wooden puppets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
For those who are unconcerned about how artists' efforts fit into the flow of art history, Jan de Swart's sculpture can be an unadulterated pleasure. In an exhibition of 68 works at the Laguna Art Museum the 78-year-old California artist proves himself a craftsman and a poet. Several rooms overloaded with De Swart's works in wood, plastic and metal contain craggy reliefs, spindly towers, chunky figures, wavy columns and magical creations with doors to be opened and treasures to be discovered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1986 | Bob Pool, Time Staff Writer
Katharine Diemert knew she'd stumbled across a jewel the first time she spied the tiny cottage nestled in an oak grove next to a bubbling Calabasas stream. Diemert didn't learn just how precious her find was, however, until she bought the picturesque house last year and moved in. When she peeked into its small attic to look for storage space, she found a cardboard box hidden beneath the eaves. The box contained a veritable family of carefully detailed wooden puppets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2001 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first subdivision in Calabasas wasn't a swank gated community or collection of mini-mansions of the kind the city is famous for today. It was a rakish art colony full of eccentric little cottages and studios, some designed by modern architectural master Rudolph Schindler. Arlene Bernholtz and George French recently drove through the city's winding streets pointing out remnants of Park Moderne, the artists colony that once flourished among the oaks and manzanita.
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December 28, 2008 | Greg Goldin, Goldin is the architecture critic at Los Angeles Magazine.
Arts & Architecture, which folded 41 years ago, is the most influential architecture magazine ever published. During the height of its run, from 1945 to 1967, it convinced the world that Los Angeles was at the vanguard of reinventing the single family home. John Entenza, the editor, quietly featured the work of Isamu Noguchi, Henry Moore, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Eero Saarinen, Richard Neutra, George Nelson, Charles Eames, George Nakashima and Bernard Rudofsky.
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