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Jan Garbarek

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June 28, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Jan Garbarek was best known as a member of Keith Jarrett's early '70s European quartet but the Norwegian saxophonist has been a fixture at the ECM label since that time. ECM had a reputation for an ethereal, "pastel" label sound so it's not surprising that Garbarek sounded like the godfather of Nordic new age music in his local debut at the L.A. Theatre Center on Thursday. His high-tech quartet played music of the mind that largely abandoned rhythmic pulse to stress textural improvisation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the fastest selling, non-pop albums these days is an extraordinary hybrid of jazz improvisation and early a cappella music that was conceived on a road in Iceland. "Officium," released by ECM's classically oriented New Series, features the Hilliard Ensemble, a vocal group from England, singing 12th- to 16th-Century liturgical works by such renowned early composers as Cristobal de Morales and Magnus Perotinus.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the fastest selling, non-pop albums these days is an extraordinary hybrid of jazz improvisation and early a cappella music that was conceived on a road in Iceland. "Officium," released by ECM's classically oriented New Series, features the Hilliard Ensemble, a vocal group from England, singing 12th- to 16th-Century liturgical works by such renowned early composers as Cristobal de Morales and Magnus Perotinus.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 1986 | DON SNOWDEN
Jan Garbarek was best known as a member of Keith Jarrett's early '70s European quartet but the Norwegian saxophonist has been a fixture at the ECM label since that time. ECM had a reputation for an ethereal, "pastel" label sound so it's not surprising that Garbarek sounded like the godfather of Nordic new age music in his local debut at the L.A. Theatre Center on Thursday. His high-tech quartet played music of the mind that largely abandoned rhythmic pulse to stress textural improvisation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE
*** Jan Garbarek, Miroslav Vitous, Peter Erskine, "Star," ECM. Norwegian saxophonist Garbarek uses tone to his advantage, weaving flute-soft sounds through the title tune or spreading a somber glow with his tenor on bassist Vitous' "Lamenting." "Clouds in the Mountain," a reworking of a Vitous piece originally recorded in 1969 as "Mountain in the Clouds, " is a vehicle for the bassist's woody resonance and strong narrative ways.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
Jazz's remarkable capacity to absorb the talents of musicians from virtually every part of the world was on whole display Friday night at McCabe's Guitar Shop. Saxophonist Jan Garbarek, leading a stunningly gifted quartet of international players--including Lars Jannson, Eberhard Weber and Nana Vasconsuelos--presented a program as creatively stimulating as any heard this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Anouar Brahem has a well-deserved reputation as a genre-slipping musical shape-shifter. Although the Tunisian artist is a trained master of classical oud playing, he has collaborated with French jazz musicians, practitioners of classical Indian music and such major jazz artists as bassist Dave Holland and saxophonist Jan Garbarek.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
An avant-garde music festival scheduled for March -- a central offering of UCLA's performing arts season that was to be dedicated to the German record label ECM -- has been canceled because of scheduling and financial difficulties. "UCLA and ECM have been unable to agree on festival content so have decided to cancel the festival," says UCLA Live director David Sefton of what was to be called "Elective Affinities: an ECM Festival."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
Most American jazz musicians in the '90s have focused strongly upon restoring the mainstream styles of the '50s and '60s. Ironically, at the same time, many jazz players from other parts of the world have moved away from the mainstream, taking the music into intriguing areas of exploration and discovery. Indian percussionist Trilok Gurtu, who appeared with his quartet at LunaPark Wednesday night, has never been quite like any other drummer.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Let's start with the name. The group DO'AH, according to co-leader and guitarist Randy Armstrong, is a Persian word signifying a call to prayer. A bit esoteric, perhaps, for a pop or jazz group, but, as its Sunday-night opening set at At My Place made amply clear, New Hampshire-based New Age group DO'AH has lofty aspirations--most notably to blend jazz and pop with what might loosely (if somewhat inaccurately) be described as "world music."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
It wasn't exactly an adventurous year for jazz Grammy nominations, with virtually no entries from such exciting young performers as Joshua Redman and Cyrus Chestnut. So it's no surprise that the academy, despite its professed interest in youth, chose to honor veterans and push aside the few young performers nominated.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 1998 | Music Review JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Originally a recording concept, the "Meeting of Angels" mix of Gregorian chant and North Indian sitar music has been transposed into an unlikely but viable touring concert. Sitarist Ustad Nishat Khan and the Gregorian Voices quartet delivered the package Friday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre on their first trip through the United States. As with similar New Age conceits, such as the Jan Garbarek/Hilliard Ensemble "Officium," a certain suspension of cynical and purist impulses is required here.
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