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Jan Harlan

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June 12, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan Harlan didn't make the documentary, "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," to clarify any misconceptions about the visionary filmmaker who died two years ago at the age of 70. "They were not his concern and they were not my concern," says Harlan, Kubrick's brother-in-law and executive producer of Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon," "The Shining," "Full Metal Jacket," "Eyes Wide Shut" and the upcoming project Kubrick didn't live to film, "A.I.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2001 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan Harlan didn't make the documentary, "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," to clarify any misconceptions about the visionary filmmaker who died two years ago at the age of 70. "They were not his concern and they were not my concern," says Harlan, Kubrick's brother-in-law and executive producer of Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon," "The Shining," "Full Metal Jacket," "Eyes Wide Shut" and the upcoming project Kubrick didn't live to film, "A.I.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
A benefit screening of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a documentary about the film director, will be held Sunday in Ojai. The documentary was directed by Kubrick's brother-in-law, Jan Harlan. Proceeds will benefit the Ojai Film Festival. After the 4:30 p.m. screening, Harlan will answer questions and discuss Kubrick's life. Actor Malcolm McDowell, an Ojai resident, will join the discussion. McDowell starred in Kubrick's 1971 classic, "A Clockwork Orange."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1999 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The combination of sex and death (have I got your attention yet?) has always tantalized artists, especially as they age, and, if "Eyes Wide Shut" is any indication, most especially Stanley Kubrick. Far from the hot date-night movie the racy Warner Bros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2001
A benefit screening of "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," a documentary about the legendary film director, will be held Sunday in Ojai. The documentary was directed by Kubrick's brother-in-law, Jan Harlan. Proceeds from the screening will benefit the Ojai Film Festival, whose annual event in November will feature Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" on opening night. Harlan will answer questions and discuss Kubrick's life after the 4:30 p.m. screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1999 | JON BURLINGAME, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British avant-garde composer Jocelyn Pook may be one of the luckiest musicians around. Not only did director Stanley Kubrick ask her to write original music for his "Eyes Wide Shut," he actually used it. The legendary director was well known for his use of classical music: Strauss and Ligeti in "2001: A Space Odyssey," Beethoven and Purcell in "A Clockwork Orange," Handel and Schubert in "Barry Lyndon," Bartok and Penderecki in "The Shining."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2002 | Elaine Dutka
TELEVISION PBS President: On Second Thought ... Pat Mitchell tried to bolster morale among her PBS troops as they held their annual meeting in San Francisco this week. Downplaying the significance of the network's flagging ratings, she tried to reframe an earlier comment she made about the significance of those numbers. "We are dangerously close in our overall prime-time number to falling below the relevance quotient," the PBS president told public TV programmers in May.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Movie Critic
Families suffering under a curse are a staple of melodramatic fiction, but what if a family labored under a curse in real life? And what if that curse was something created by their long-dead father and grandfather, one of Nazi Germany's most infamous filmmakers? Such is the compelling premise behind the deeply fascinating, unexpectedly potent documentary "Harlan — In the Shadow of 'Jew Suss.' " The Harlan of the title is Veit Harlan, who along with Leni Riefenstahl was the Third Reich's most celebrated and successful director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Among films screening in LACMA's "The Architect of Destiny: Fritz Lang in Germany" is the director's fourth film, "Harakiri" (1919), a loose adaptation of "Madame Butterfly," based not on the Puccini opera but a David Belasco play. It was long thought lost until discovered in a Dutch film archive in the 1980s and then restored. It is a remarkable evocation of Japan, which Lang had visited, and a stunningly beautiful film.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The American Cinematheque's "Grand Master: The Films of Stanley Kubrick" continues at the Egyptian tonight at 7:30 with the presentation of "Lolita" (1962). When Kubrick brought the controversial Vladimir Nabokov novel to the screen, he cast 15-year-old newcomer Sue Lyon in the title role without specifying her age, which in the book was only 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"A.I." is a chilly fairy tale, a spooky and disturbing film about the nature of innocence, an investigation of personal love in which the nominally most caring, feeling creatures are not really human. If that sounds disconcerting and contradictory but still absorbing, you've arrived at the heart of the matter. A not quite seamless, not completely satisfying but invariably attention-grabbing combination of divergent themes, genres and even story lines, "A.I.
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