Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJan Kemp
IN THE NEWS

Jan Kemp

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
November 29, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Room 410 in the English building at the University of Georgia seems drab enough to induce inertia. The concrete-block walls, windowless, are painted a dull yellow. There are no desks, only long rows of tables with chairs bolted to the floor. It does not seem to be a creative atmosphere for a remedial writing course. Just the same, a lively discussion has been engaged, concerning the impending final exam and a standardized basic English test required of all students by the state board of regents.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
June 28, 1989
A three-month investigation at the University of Georgia found "no substantial basis" for recent complaints filed by Jan Kemp, the professor whose 1986 lawsuit sparked reforms in the education of Georgia's student athletes. The report said, however, that Kemp had been the victim of retaliation, though it did not identify those responsible. Kemp, the English coordinator in Georgia's developmental studies program, filed grievances in March alleging that tutors for student athletes were incompetent, that athletes were being taught how to avoid being caught in random drug testing and that athletes received partiality in student judiciary cases.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 28, 1989
A three-month investigation at the University of Georgia found "no substantial basis" for recent complaints filed by Jan Kemp, the professor whose 1986 lawsuit sparked reforms in the education of Georgia's student athletes. The report said, however, that Kemp had been the victim of retaliation, though it did not identify those responsible. Kemp, the English coordinator in Georgia's developmental studies program, filed grievances in March alleging that tutors for student athletes were incompetent, that athletes were being taught how to avoid being caught in random drug testing and that athletes received partiality in student judiciary cases.
SPORTS
November 29, 1988 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Room 410 in the English building at the University of Georgia seems drab enough to induce inertia. The concrete-block walls, windowless, are painted a dull yellow. There are no desks, only long rows of tables with chairs bolted to the floor. It does not seem to be a creative atmosphere for a remedial writing course. Just the same, a lively discussion has been engaged, concerning the impending final exam and a standardized basic English test required of all students by the state board of regents.
SPORTS
May 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Jan Kemp, the fired University of Georgia assistant professor, said Friday that an agreement has been reached by which she will return to the school but will not report to the two administrators whom she battled successfully in court. Kemp, former coordinator of the English program in the remedial Developmental Studies Program, said Thursday night that she and the university had reached an agreement under which she would receive a cash settlement and get her job back.
SPORTS
February 13, 1986 | Associated Press
A federal court jury Wednesday awarded $2.57 million in back pay and damages to Jan Kemp, a former English instructor at the University of Georgia who said she was fired for speaking out against academic favoritism for student athletes. The six-member U.S. District Court jury found that two Georgia officials--Vice President for Academic Affairs Virginia Trotter and Developmental Studies Director Leroy Ervin--violated Kemp's right to free speech by demoting and firing her.
SPORTS
May 18, 1989
University of Georgia professor Jan Kemp said she does not intend to apologize for trying to steer her students away from athletic department tutors because she believes them to be incompetent. Two tutors employed by the University of Georgia Athletic Assn. have asked for a formal apology from Kemp for classroom remarks apparently made in connection with a grievance Kemp has filed with the University Council over the performance of some association tutors.
BUSINESS
May 16, 1989
Jan Kemp, who in 1986 protested the preferential treatment of student athletes, has filed two grievances with the University of Georgia, apparently about the school's athletic program, university officials confirmed. The officials refused to divulge the text of the grievances but said they involved the athletic department. Kemp, a developmental studies assistant professor, was out of town until Wednesday and unavailable for comment. Kemp successfully sued the university after she was fired for protesting the preferential treatment of student athletes.
SPORTS
May 3, 1986 | Associated Press
Jan Kemp, the fired University of Georgia assistant professor, said Friday that an agreement has been reached by which she will return to the school but will not report to the two administrators whom she battled successfully in court. Kemp, former coordinator of the English program in the remedial Developmental Studies Program, said Thursday night that she and the university had reached an agreement under which she would receive a cash settlement and get her job back.
SPORTS
February 13, 1986 | Associated Press
A federal court jury Wednesday awarded $2.57 million in back pay and damages to Jan Kemp, a former English instructor at the University of Georgia who said she was fired for speaking out against academic favoritism for student athletes. The six-member U.S. District Court jury found that two Georgia officials--Vice President for Academic Affairs Virginia Trotter and Developmental Studies Director Leroy Ervin--violated Kemp's right to free speech by demoting and firing her.
SPORTS
June 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
A University of Georgia faculty committee investigating allegations made by assistant developmental studies Prof. Jan Kemp against the Athletic Assn. suggested that the university do away with the developmental studies program and incorporate remedial courses into traditional academic departments. After interviewing 32 people during the last month, the two-member athlete review subcommittee concluded that the university investigate "the possibility that the developmental studies program be eliminated" because of the "social-academic stigma attached to students enrolled in developmental studies."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|