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Jan Miner

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
Jan Miner, a New York stage actress who gained fame as Madge the Manicurist in Palmolive television ads, has died. She was 86. Miner died Sunday at the Bethel Health Care Facility in Bethel, Conn., her agent, Michael Thomas, told the New York Times. She had been living in nearby Southbury, Conn. From the 1940s to the '80s, Miner appeared on and off Broadway and in productions in St. Louis; New Haven, Conn.; and Stratford, Conn.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2004 | From Associated Press
Jan Miner, a New York stage actress who gained fame as Madge the Manicurist in Palmolive television ads, has died. She was 86. Miner died Sunday at the Bethel Health Care Facility in Bethel, Conn., her agent, Michael Thomas, told the New York Times. She had been living in nearby Southbury, Conn. From the 1940s to the '80s, Miner appeared on and off Broadway and in productions in St. Louis; New Haven, Conn.; and Stratford, Conn.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | Hank Stuever, Washington Post
Jan Miner played Madge the Manicurist in an age of blissful, new-and-improved consumer disbelief. Madge came about in a time when Madison Avenue conspired to fool diners at fine restaurants by having their coffee secretly replaced by Folgers, to make Mother Nature think margarine was butter, and to surreptitiously dunk women's hands in Palmolive dish soap. "You're soaking in it" was Madge's trademark line, first uttered in a television commercial in 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2004 | Hank Stuever, Washington Post
Jan Miner played Madge the Manicurist in an age of blissful, new-and-improved consumer disbelief. Madge came about in a time when Madison Avenue conspired to fool diners at fine restaurants by having their coffee secretly replaced by Folgers, to make Mother Nature think margarine was butter, and to surreptitiously dunk women's hands in Palmolive dish soap. "You're soaking in it" was Madge's trademark line, first uttered in a television commercial in 1966.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1990 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 16-year-old girl sues her date when he stands her up for the prom. Is she a heroine or a troublemaker? The answer is never in doubt in "Stood Up!," today's simplistic "ABC Afterschool Special" (3 p.m. on Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42). Lucy Deakins ("The Boy Who Could Fly") is high school junior and budding photographer Becky, thrilled when senior gymnastics star Garrett (Spike Alexander) asks her to his prom. Becky earns money for a dress and on the big night eagerly waits for her escort.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Morton Da Costa, who directed such legendary Broadway hits as "The Music Man," "Auntie Mame," "No Time for Sergeants" and "Plain and Fancy," has died of a heart attack. He was 74. Da Costa, who lived in nearby West Redding, died Sunday in a Danbury hospital. Although eventually known as one of the most praised and profitable directors in the country, Da Costa actually wanted to become an actor.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1986 | GAIL BUCHALTER
The stage lights came up slowly and revealed several paintings. Seated in front of Pablo Picasso's "Portrait of Gertrude Stein" was a real-life imitation of the famed lesbian writer and expatriate who began speaking in a deep, booming voice. Her rhythmic speech was patterned after Stein's own writings. Suddenly the figure stood, her caftan swirled around her thick body as she yanked off the hat that concealed her close-cropped gray hair. "Is that a man?" someone in the audience whispered. No.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | BEVERLY BEYETTE
Commuters dipping onto Laurel Canyon Boulevard just south of Mulholland this morning were no doubt amused, bemused or just plain puzzled by this hand-lettered roadside sign: MOLEHILL MADE OUT OF A MOUNTAIN. No, it's not some crazed Burma Shave survivor on the loose. It's Jon Earl--and he doesn't trek to that spot at daybreak to plant his signs solely to titillate motorists crossing from the Valley to Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1990 | Compiled by Pat H. Broeske, David J. Fox and John M. Wilson
Nearly everyone involved in the making of a film bemoans a favorite scene that ends up on the cutting-room floor. We asked some filmmakers associated with a handful of 1990 movies to tell us about the outtakes they most remember--or regret. The rough cut of Orion Pictures' "Dances With Wolves"--the story of a U.S. soldier befriended by a tribe of Sioux Indians fighting for survival against invading whites--came in at over five hours, and two hours had to be chopped.
NEWS
May 15, 1986 | DAVID NELSON
Mercedes McCambridge, the actress whose nearly bottomless voice rasped out the voice of the demon in the movie "The Exorcist," is not one to mince words. She tends to express herself . . . well, forcefully. And McCambridge made one heck of a statement to the 150 guests who gathered May 7 at the James S. Copley Library to help launch the monthlong 1986 San Diego Festival of the Arts. "I do not like green eggs and ham," she growled, and there wasn't a soul present who doubted her sincerity.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
This year, we experienced the loss of one of the greatest film actors of the 20th century, a trailblazing R&B singer, television pioneers, dance legends, a movie star who become a champion for the disabled and one of the last of Walt Disney's renowned animators. Here's a look at some of the legends to whom the world said goodbye in 2004. Ray Charles 73, singer Known as the "Genius of Soul," the musical innovator broke color barriers in the 1950s and '60s, but his legacy also extends beyond rock and soul to country music.
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