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Jan Olszewski

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December 18, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks after this nation's parliamentary elections, the second proposed candidate for prime minister gave up Tuesday on efforts to form a new Polish government and submitted his resignation to Parliament. Jan Olszewski--a 61-year-old lawyer who had been the candidate of a five-party center-right coalition advocating a slower approach to economic reform--blamed his failure on President Lech Walesa's lack of support for his proposed government.
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NEWS
June 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
Poland's Parliament voted early today to oust Prime Minister Jan Olszewski, bringing down Poland's third post-Communist government in three years. President Lech Walesa sought the removal of Olszewski after he abruptly released the names of officials who may have collaborated with secret police under the old Communist regime. The vote was 273 to dismiss the five-month-old government, 119 against and 33 abstentions.
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NEWS
June 5, 1992 | From Associated Press
Poland's Parliament voted early today to oust Prime Minister Jan Olszewski, bringing down Poland's third post-Communist government in three years. President Lech Walesa sought the removal of Olszewski after he abruptly released the names of officials who may have collaborated with secret police under the old Communist regime. The vote was 273 to dismiss the five-month-old government, 119 against and 33 abstentions.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime ministerial candidate Jan Olszewski was trudging back to the drawing boards Wednesday, instructed to try again to come up with an acceptable government after the Polish Parliament voted to reject his withdrawal from the office. Olszewski, 61, announced Tuesday that he had given up his efforts to form a government, in the wake of a cool reception by President Lech Walesa to his proposed Cabinet and because the center-right coalition that backed him had fallen apart.
NEWS
December 19, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime ministerial candidate Jan Olszewski was trudging back to the drawing boards Wednesday, instructed to try again to come up with an acceptable government after the Polish Parliament voted to reject his withdrawal from the office. Olszewski, 61, announced Tuesday that he had given up his efforts to form a government, in the wake of a cool reception by President Lech Walesa to his proposed Cabinet and because the center-right coalition that backed him had fallen apart.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing finally to the complicated arithmetic of the fractured Polish Parliament, President Lech Walesa on Thursday nominated for prime minister the candidate proposed by a center-right coalition with the largest chunk of votes in the legislature.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | Reuters
Polish Prime Minister Jan Olszewski will hold talks with President Bush during a four-day working visit to the United States next week, a Polish government adviser said Wednesday.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Jan Olszewski led a somber ceremony Wednesday marking the 49th anniversary of the doomed revolt by Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto against their Nazi overlords. Tens of thousands died of disease or were killed in the walled-off ghetto from 1940 to 1943.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President-elect Lech Walesa's favored candidate for prime minister abandoned talks today on forming a new government because of "important differences" with Poland's new leader. Solidarity lawyer Jan Olszewski said in a statement: "In the face of important differences between the president-elect and myself over views on the shape of the government, I resigned from my mission on Dec. 18."
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Poland's two-month-long government crisis ended when Parliament narrowly voted to accept a Cabinet that is likely to loosen the tough economic austerity program of President Lech Walesa. Last week, legislators gave Prime Minister Jan Olszewski a vote of confidence by rejecting his resignation, which he filed after saying his feud with Walesa made it impossible to choose a Cabinet. Ultimately his choices, once rejected, were approved by lawmakers unwilling to prolong the crisis.
NEWS
December 18, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks after this nation's parliamentary elections, the second proposed candidate for prime minister gave up Tuesday on efforts to form a new Polish government and submitted his resignation to Parliament. Jan Olszewski--a 61-year-old lawyer who had been the candidate of a five-party center-right coalition advocating a slower approach to economic reform--blamed his failure on President Lech Walesa's lack of support for his proposed government.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | CHARLES T. POWERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bowing finally to the complicated arithmetic of the fractured Polish Parliament, President Lech Walesa on Thursday nominated for prime minister the candidate proposed by a center-right coalition with the largest chunk of votes in the legislature.
NEWS
December 24, 1991 | Associated Press
Poland's two-month-long government crisis ended Monday when Parliament narrowly voted to accept a Cabinet that is likely to loosen up on the tough economic austerity program of President Lech Walesa. Last week, legislators gave Prime Minister Jan Olszewski a vote of confidence by rejecting his resignation, which he filed after saying his feud with Walesa made it impossible to select a Cabinet.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | Times Wire Services
A 33-year-old farmer became Poland's prime minister Friday and promised a Cabinet committed to resuming the country's stalled political and economic reforms. Waldemar Pawlak, leader of the Polish Peasants Party, was voted in by Parliament, 261 to 149, just hours after President Lech Walesa submitted Pawlak's nomination. Parliament late Friday had fired Prime Minister Jan Olszewski.
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