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Jan Palach

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January 17, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan Palach was finally vindicated here Tuesday, 21 years after he turned himself into a human torch for freedom. On Jan. 16, 1969, Palach, inspired by monks who were immolating themselves to protest events half a world away in Vietnam, set himself on fire in Prague's Wenceslas Square to protest the Soviet-led invasion of his country five months earlier. The 21-year-old Palach died three days later, a symbol of resistance that shocked, inspired and in some instances shamed his countrymen.
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NEWS
January 17, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jan Palach was finally vindicated here Tuesday, 21 years after he turned himself into a human torch for freedom. On Jan. 16, 1969, Palach, inspired by monks who were immolating themselves to protest events half a world away in Vietnam, set himself on fire in Prague's Wenceslas Square to protest the Soviet-led invasion of his country five months earlier. The 21-year-old Palach died three days later, a symbol of resistance that shocked, inspired and in some instances shamed his countrymen.
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NEWS
January 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Police prevented human rights activists from making a pilgrimage Saturday to the village of Jan Palach, who burned himself to death 20 years ago in protest against the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia. Police also guarded Prague's central Wenceslas Square, where crowds last week staged the biggest political protests in 20 years, but there were no demonstrations. The protests began last Sunday to commemorate Palach's fiery suicide and went on for six consecutive days.
NEWS
January 22, 1989 | From Reuters
Police prevented human rights activists from making a pilgrimage Saturday to the village of Jan Palach, who burned himself to death 20 years ago in protest against the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia. Police also guarded Prague's central Wenceslas Square, where crowds last week staged the biggest political protests in 20 years, but there were no demonstrations. The protests began last Sunday to commemorate Palach's fiery suicide and went on for six consecutive days.
NEWS
February 15, 1989
Dissident Czechoslovak playwright Vaclav Havel, arrested and jailed Jan. 16 for anti-government protests, will stand trial next Tuesday on charges of incitement to a criminal act, family sources said. If sentenced, Havel could spend two years in prison.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and JUDITH MICHAELSON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Playwright Arthur Miller has added his voice to the growing number of writers and artists around the world calling on Czechoslovakian authorities to free jailed playwright Vaclav Havel. "I can't imagine a government in Europe in 1989 doing this to a writer. It is beyond belief, it is a horror," said Miller. Havel, a founder of the Charter 77 human rights movement, was arrested Jan.
NEWS
January 19, 1989
About 5,000 Czechoslovaks filled Prague's Wenceslas Square for the fourth straight day, chanting "Freedom!" "Truth!" and "Human rights!" But police did not disperse the crowd as they had in the previous three days. The demonstrators chanted the names of dissident playwright Vaclav Havel and others jailed for taking part in demonstrations that began Sunday in memory of Jan Palach. The 20-year-old Palach burned himself alive Jan.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | From Associated Press
The wife of Czechoslovakia's leading dissident said in an interview broadcast Saturday that her husband has fallen ill and may not be receiving adequate medical attention in prison. The dissident, playwright Vaclav Havel, was sentenced Tuesday to nine months in prison after being convicted of inciting citizens to take part in a banned demonstration and obstructing police officers.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | From Times wire services
Czechoslovak police broke up a demonstration in central Prague today for the second day in succession as human rights activists sought to commemorate the 20th anniversary of a protest suicide, dissident sources said. The sources said a group of more than 10 activists in the Charter 77 human rights movement laid flowers in Wenceslas Square where Jan Palach set fire to himself on Jan. 16, 1969, to protest against the Soviet-led invasion the previous August.
NEWS
February 21, 1989 | From Times wire services
Playwright Vaclav Havel was sentenced today to nine months imprisonment in a strict-regime prison after being convicted of incitement and obstructing a public official. Havel, Czechoslovakia's best-known dissident, was one of nine dissidents arrested Jan. 16 during illegal celebrations marking the anniversary of the death of Jan Palach, a student who set himself ablaze to protest the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia.
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | United Press International
Hundreds of police, backed by water cannon and tear gas, charged into a public square for a second day Monday and scattered thousands of demonstrators on the 20th anniversary of the suicide of a 20-year-old dissident student. The police apparently attacked when a group of activists tried for a second time to place flowers at the site in Wenceslas Square where dissident Jan Palach set himself on fire in 1969 to protest the 1968 Soviet-led invasion of Czechoslovakia.
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