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Jan Schlichtmann

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1999 | Ellen McCarty, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 14
The Orange County Water District was named a 1999 Groundwater Guardian National Partner by the National Groundwater Foundation, the district announced Aug. 4. The district joins the ranks of other such national partners as McDonald's, DuPont Agricultural Products and Cargill Corp.
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NEWS
July 29, 1986 | Associated Press
W. R. Grace Co. was responsible for contaminating two drinking wells in the industrial suburb of Woburn, a federal jury decided Monday, setting the stage for a second trial to determine if the pollution caused leukemia that killed six people. The jury cleared another defendant, corporate giant Beatrice Foods Co., of any liability in the case.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Movie: "A Civil Action." The Costume Designer: Shay Cunliffe, whose credits include "City of Angels," "Lone Star," "Multiplicity," "Mrs. Soffel" and the television series "Fallen Angels." The Setup: True story of Jan Schlichtmann (John Travolta), a personal injury lawyer in Boston who takes on a daunting environmental lawsuit against two mighty corporations. One of his toughest opponents is attorney Jerome Facher (Robert Duvall).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"A Civil Action" comes close, achingly close, to greatness. Finely cast, classically shot, written and directed with sureness and skill and based on a book compelling enough to stay on bestseller lists for two years, it's a story told so confidently and well that it seems fated to succeed. But as proficient a job as writer-director Steve Zaillian and his team do, "A Civil Action" has unmistakably unraveled by its close.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 1998 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The elusiveness of truth is an idea woven throughout the movie "A Civil Action," which chronicles the real-life legal battle waged by eight Boston-area families against two corporations they held responsible for their children's deaths. Robert Duvall, who plays a lawyer for one of the accused companies, insists that truth can only be found "at the bottom of a bottomless pit."
OPINION
July 26, 2004 | Emily Bazelon, Emily Bazelon is a senior editor at Legal Affairs magazine.
Before John Edwards launched his run for the vice presidency, the Bush campaign said it was itching to run against a trial lawyer. "Bring on the ambulance chaser," then-White House spokesman Ari Fleischer beckoned. Last week, Vice President Dick Cheney was on the stump in Ohio blaming rising healthcare costs on "runaway litigation" and backing a $250,000 cap on medical malpractice awards, a tort reform proposal that the Kerry-Edwards ticket opposes.
BOOKS
September 24, 1995 | Mark Dowie, Mark Dowie "Losing Ground: American Environmentalism at the Close of the 20th Century" is published by MIT Press
Among journalists, lawyers and epidemiologists there exists a subspecies known as "cluster busters," practitioners of each trade who appear inexorably at the first sign of a cluster, the slightest rise above normal incidence of a disease or birth defect. The challenge of cluster busting sounds deceptively simple: First prove that there is a cluster (or epidemic), then determine what caused it. The epidemiologist's task is to prove the first; the lawyer, the second, and the journalist, both.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1998 | Patrick Goldstein
Jan Schlichtmann is a high-living Boston personal injury lawyer who takes on the case of his life: Civil Action #84-1672-S, representing the families of eight children who died of leukemia caused by exposure to toxic waste allegedly produced by two giant corporations--W.R. Grace and Beatrice Foods. The story of his relentless legal battle is recounted in "A Civil Action," written and directed by Steven Zaillian, who adapted the movie from Jonathan Harr's 1995 bestseller of the same name.
NEWS
October 17, 1995 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet Jan Schlichtmann, personal-injury lawyer on the brink of self-destruction. It is July, 1986, and Schlichtmann's black Porsche 928 has just been repossessed. His luxury condo, with a view of the Charles River, is about to be foreclosed, his office furniture removed for non-payment of rental fees. Nor has he paid the salaries of his loyal staff in months, nor the cleaning bills for his hand-tailored Dimitri suits and silk Hermes ties, now held hostage by the dry cleaner.
MAGAZINE
March 24, 2002 | JAMES BATES
Erin Brockovich (the woman, not the movie) has just finished speaking for an hour and 15 minutes to more than 300 college bookstore managers in Room 403B in the South Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center. It was a virtuoso performance by Erin Brockovich, the motivational speaker, talking about the admittedly fallible life of Erin Brockovich, the person.
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