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Jan Troell

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's Jan Troell is known for two splendid, straightforward epics: "The Emigrants" (1971), and its sequel, "The New Land" (1972), which compose the sprawling saga of a group of Swedes coming to America, and "Flight of the Eagle" (1982), about a gallant but foolhardy attempt to reach the North Pole by balloon in 1897.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Swedish director Jan Troell will be 78 in July, and when he talks about his filmmaking choices, about where to spend "the last vestiges of his time and energy," it is not a theoretical concern. His hand, Troell says, "must be turned to something quite extraordinary," and with "Everlasting Moments," it definitely is.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2009 | Susan King
Swedish director Jan Troell doesn't take Hollywood and its awards very seriously. "I take it with a little bit of salt," said the low-key director during a recent visit to Los Angeles for the Golden Globe Awards. His latest film, the poignant "Everlasting Moments," which opens in L.A. in limited release on Friday, had been nominated for a Globe for foreign-language film. The film, though, lost to "Waltz With Bashir."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2009 | Susan King
Swedish director Jan Troell doesn't take Hollywood and its awards very seriously. "I take it with a little bit of salt," said the low-key director during a recent visit to Los Angeles for the Golden Globe Awards. His latest film, the poignant "Everlasting Moments," which opens in L.A. in limited release on Friday, had been nominated for a Globe for foreign-language film. The film, though, lost to "Waltz With Bashir."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Swedish director Jan Troell will be 78 in July, and when he talks about his filmmaking choices, about where to spend "the last vestiges of his time and energy," it is not a theoretical concern. His hand, Troell says, "must be turned to something quite extraordinary," and with "Everlasting Moments," it definitely is.
MAGAZINE
November 3, 1985
This magazine warrants a couple of weeks on the coffee table alongside Time, Newsweek and Weight Watchers. The puzzle was a good one except for the error on 83 across: "The Emigrants" is not a Bergman film but was directed by Jan Troell. Robert A. Myers Whittier
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Susan King
Clint Eastwood isn't the only septuagenarian directing remarkable movies. Swedish director Jan Troell, 77, is as active today as he was when he began working as a filmmaker in 1966. His latest movie, the period drama "Everlasting Moments," is nominated for a Golden Globe for best foreign-language film and is Sweden's entry in the Oscar sweepstakes. It's scheduled to open in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2009 | Susan King
Documentarian Brigitte Cornand first met the now 97-year-old artist Louise Bourgeois in 1994 and over the next dozen years collaborated on a trio of videos. Now, Film at REDCAT will screen "Chere Louise," the first installment in the trilogy, on Monday with Cornand attending this L.A. premiere. www.redcatorg Film Forum opener The Los Angeles Film Forum opens its 2009 season Sunday at the Egyptian with "Brakhage With Brakhage: Marilyn Brakhage Introducing Films by Stan Brakhage." Among the avant-garde great's films to be shown are 1970's "The Machine of Eden" and 1974's "He was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1990 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sweden's Jan Troell is known for two splendid, straightforward epics: "The Emigrants" (1971), and its sequel, "The New Land" (1972), which compose the sprawling saga of a group of Swedes coming to America, and "Flight of the Eagle" (1982), about a gallant but foolhardy attempt to reach the North Pole by balloon in 1897.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1997 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A little girl approaches a tall, distinguished-looking old man, throws a book at him and, saying her mother told her to, asks, "Why did you become a traitor?" In his remarkably compelling 160-minute "Hamsun," veteran Swedish writer-director Jan Troell succeeds stunningly in making us understand how Norwegian novelist and poet Knut Hamsun, winner of the 1920 Nobel Prize for literature, came to be one of the few major European artists to support Hitler.
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