Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJane Alexander
IN THE NEWS

Jane Alexander

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 8, 1993 | GREG MILLER and DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton on Saturday nominated actress Jane Alexander to head the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency whose funding decisions have been attacked by conservatives in recent years. If confirmed by the Senate, Alexander, an award-winning performer in theater, movies and television, would assume a post that has been held by interim officials since John E. Frohnmayer was fired by President George Bush in February, 1992.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By David Ng
The future head of the National Endowment for the Arts will likely face many of the same funding challenges that have beset the organization for years, according to two former chairs of the federal arts organization. In separate interviews, Dana Gioia and actress Jane Alexander, both of whom have served as chairs of the NEA, said that the organization continues to be under-funded and that restoring cuts to its budgets will likely be at the top of the next chair's agenda. On Wednesday, Jane Chu was announced as President Obama's nominee to be chairwoman of the NEA. Chu, the president and chief executive of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City, Mo., faces Senate confirmation.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1993 | On Saturday, President Clinton nominated actress Jane Alexander to head the National Endowment for the Arts. In this open letter, Times art critic Christopher Knight sends Alexander his thoughts on the challenge she is facing
Dear Jane Alexander: Congratulations on your nomination to chair the National Endowment for the Arts! We've been waiting patiently to see whom the President would finally select for the post. It means a lot to a lot of people. Now, I must confess the chairmanship is a job I currently wouldn't wish on my worst enemy. Who would want to head a federal agency that's become the principal battleground of a culture war, revved up by conservatives on the religious right?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Neil Simon is sitting intently and somewhat nervously in the rehearsal hall at the Geffen Playhouse, observing as Jane Alexander and Len Cariou read the new last scene of his play "Rose and Walsh." The prolific, Tony Award-winning author of such hits as "The Odd Couple," "Brighton Beach Memoirs" and "Lost in Yonkers" wrote the new version the previous evening, so this is the first time the cast is seeing the revised finale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
After four skillful years at the helm of the National Endowment for the Arts, Jane Alexander is leaving that turbulent position. She deserves much of the credit for restructuring the endowment and for saving it from the many who tried so hard to kill it. Throughout her tenure, Alexander, the sixth chairman in the agency's 32-year history, conducted herself with dignity and grace, holding her opponents in Congress to the same high standards of behavior.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993
The full Senate is about to vote on the appointment of Jane Alexander to head the National Endowment for the Arts. Alexander, a Tony Award-winning actor well-regarded in the arts community, has not generated any personal controversy. If an actor can serve as chief executive of the United States, no objection can be lodged against one serving as chief executive of a federal agency. Alexander is also an arts activist admired for her work for nonprofit regional theaters.
NEWS
July 14, 1991 | SUSAN KING, Times Staff Writer
Jane Alexander, one of the most accomplished actresses of this generation, has won a Tony, an Emmy and received four Oscar nominations. Her husband, Edwin Sherin, is an award-winning theater and film director. The two fell in love 23 years ago when he directed her to a Tony in "The Great White Hope." Georgia O'Keeffe, who died in 1986, was one of the most accomplished artists of this century. Her husband, Alfred Stieglitz, was a groundbreaking photographer of the early 1900s.
OPINION
October 2, 1994 | Steve Proffitt, Steve Proffitt is a producer for Fox News and a contributor to National Public Radio's "All Things Considered" and "Morning Edition." He spoke with Jane Alexander while the NEA chair drove from San Francisco toward the Silicon Valley
President Bill Clinton may have had the soothing power of celebrity in mind when he nominated actress Jane Alexander to head the controversial National Endowment for the Arts. In the Washington halls of power, senators and representatives are the VIPs, but when a genuine Hollywood movie star shows up on Capitol Hill, even veteran committee chairmen have been known to swoon. Alexander plays down the importance of star power, but so far she has charmed some of the NEA's most vocal critics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1994 | JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a delicate time for American arts, and for the National Endowment for the Arts in particular. Money is scarce, and years of controversy over sexual and religious imagery have bruised the sensibilities of politicians and artists alike.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1993 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In February of 1992, in the wake of attacks by then-presidential hopeful Patrick Buchanan, former President George Bush abruptly fired John E. Frohnmayer, then-chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, hoping to take the sting out of the conservative columnist's charges that the government arts agency was funding "obscene" art with tax dollars.
BOOKS
June 25, 2000 | KAREN FINLEY, Karen Finley is the author of "Pooh Unplugged: An Unauthorized Memoir" and the forthcoming "A Different Kind of Intimacy: The Collected Writings of Karen Finley."
I didn't want to review "Command Performance." I turned it down. Twice. For me to review Jane Alexander's book about her tenure as head of the National Endowment for the Arts would be like a food critic reviewing a restaurant whose food he once got sick on. And then there's the court battle: The National Endowment for the Arts and Jane Alexander vs. Karen Finley et al. The case that let the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1998 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
There may be a reason Jane Alexander chose "Honour" as her return to the stage after four years of serving as chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts. She headed the NEA while Congress was slashing its budget and trying to dismantle it. When she left last year, the most common assessment of her ordeal was that she conducted herself with unusual grace and dignity. Reportedly, even Jesse Helms was impressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1997
After four skillful years at the helm of the National Endowment for the Arts, Jane Alexander is leaving that turbulent position. She deserves much of the credit for restructuring the endowment and for saving it from the many who tried so hard to kill it. Throughout her tenure, Alexander, the sixth chairman in the agency's 32-year history, conducted herself with dignity and grace, holding her opponents in Congress to the same high standards of behavior.
NEWS
October 9, 1997 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actress Jane Alexander announced Wednesday that she will step down this month as head of the National Endowment for the Arts after shepherding the agency--wounded but alive--through an ongoing war with Congress. Appointed by President Clinton in October 1993, Alexander suspended a prolific acting career to head the cultural agency and battle GOP conservatives who tried to abolish it on grounds that it funded obscene and elitist art.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 1997 | KASPER ZEUTHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House Appropriations Committee voted Thursday to decimate the budget of the National Endowment for the Arts, setting the stage for the latest showdown between the agency's defenders and detractors that have occurred since Republicans took control of Congress in 1994. The appropriations panel accepted a subcommittee recommendation to reduce the NEA's annual budget by roughly 90%--to $10 million for the fiscal year beginning Oct. 1, compared with this year's operating budget of $99.5 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jane Alexander found something in Congress Thursday for which her four years as chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts had not prepared her: a warm welcome from the House subcommittee that controls her agency's purse strings. It was less than two years ago that congressional Republicans, who had just gained control from the Democrats, slashed the NEA's budget by 40% and informally agreed to eliminate it by the 1998 fiscal year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1995 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jane Alexander, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, had not planned for her weekend visit to Los Angeles to fall just two days after the federal arts agency announced that 89 members of its staff would lose their jobs. Alexander, who was here to attend the founder's preview weekend at the Skirball Cultural Center, has drawn both praise and blame for her restrained diplomacy on Capitol Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1993 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even Jesse Helms likes her. While the National Endowment for the Arts has remained a tasty bone of contention for liberals and conservatives on Capitol Hill in recent years, somehow even those who love to hate the NEA are endorsing President Clinton's choice for the endowment's chairmanship: actress Jane Alexander.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1995 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jane Alexander, chairwoman of the National Endowment for the Arts, had not planned for her weekend visit to Los Angeles to fall just two days after the federal arts agency announced that 89 members of its staff would lose their jobs. Alexander, who was here to attend the founder's preview weekend at the Skirball Cultural Center, has drawn both praise and blame for her restrained diplomacy on Capitol Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1995 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jane Alexander, the chair of the National Endowment for the Arts, had to walk a fine line during her two-day visit to Hollywood this week. Her mission was to court the support of the show business community--a group criticized not only in the halls of Congress, but also by President Clinton--while trying to save the NEA from extinction.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|