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Jane Anderson

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February 12, 1986 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The juxtaposition was both bemusing and a little startling. Here was performer/playwright/comedienne Jane Anderson snuggling up with her cat, Schlomo. Behind her were the wooded glens of Laurel Canyon, framed and tinted by stained-glass windows. And then, she recalled her first night as a stand-up comic in New York. "I had prepared five minutes of material. It was August, hot and humid, and I was wearing something with rayon, so I was sweating like crazy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2011 | By Swati Pandey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jane Anderson has managed what at first sounds impossible: a play about a call girl, but without any nudity. But "The Escort," a world premiere commissioned by the Geffen Playhouse and opening Wednesday, pulls no further punches. With nudity less and less of a surprise onstage — it has been used for purposes lyrical, political, symbolic, and plainly erotic in works as diverse as "Frankenstein" and "The Full Monty" — "The Escort" takes off where the shock of nudity and sex usually end, using the story of a prostitute and her gynecologist to challenge strongly held beliefs about morality, family and class.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Maria Elena Fernandez, Los Angeles Times
Quite simply, Jane Anderson wanted to write about sex. In "The Quality of Life," her first commissioned play at the Geffen Playhouse in 2007, she tackled heavy and heady matters: death, suicide and cancer. Now, with her second Geffen commission, she wanted to have fun. Not that the sex she writes about in "The Escort: An Explicit Play for Discriminating People" isn't serious. The story about the relationship between a high-class call girl, her gynecologist, and the doctor's 13-year-old son and ex-husband isn't shy in its content or its delivery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By Maria Elena Fernandez, Los Angeles Times
Quite simply, Jane Anderson wanted to write about sex. In "The Quality of Life," her first commissioned play at the Geffen Playhouse in 2007, she tackled heavy and heady matters: death, suicide and cancer. Now, with her second Geffen commission, she wanted to have fun. Not that the sex she writes about in "The Escort: An Explicit Play for Discriminating People" isn't serious. The story about the relationship between a high-class call girl, her gynecologist, and the doctor's 13-year-old son and ex-husband isn't shy in its content or its delivery.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2010 | By David Ng
Tackling themes such as rape, an office shooting and kinky sex, the Geffen Playhouse's new season isn't for the faint of heart or the easily offended. The Geffen said Monday that its 2010-11 season will feature new plays by Jane Anderson and Neil LaBute, plus local premieres of work by Lynn Nottage and Tracy Letts. In addition, Hershey Felder will return with another of his signature stage biographies of a great composer. In all, there will be five plays on the Geffen's main stage, the same number of productions announced for the current season.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2011 | By Swati Pandey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Jane Anderson has managed what at first sounds impossible: a play about a call girl, but without any nudity. But "The Escort," a world premiere commissioned by the Geffen Playhouse and opening Wednesday, pulls no further punches. With nudity less and less of a surprise onstage — it has been used for purposes lyrical, political, symbolic, and plainly erotic in works as diverse as "Frankenstein" and "The Full Monty" — "The Escort" takes off where the shock of nudity and sex usually end, using the story of a prostitute and her gynecologist to challenge strongly held beliefs about morality, family and class.
NEWS
January 17, 1988
The Christmas episode of "Amen" (what beautiful singing!) and that delightful movie "The Shop Around the Corner" were the TV highlights of the holiday season. Truly a great treat! Jane Anderson, Seal Beach
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2004
Television awards: The Directors Guild of America nominees for the best made-for-TV movies, airing in 2003: Jane Anderson (HBO's "Normal"), Jeff Bleckner (ABC's "Meredith Willson's 'The Music Man' "), Rod Holcomb (FX's "The Pentagon Papers"), Richard Loncraine (HBO's "My House in Umbria"), and Mike Nichols (HBO's "Angels in America.")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
L.A. Winners: Marlane Meyer, an L.A. playwright living in New York, and Jane Anderson, an L.A. playwright living in Los Angeles, are the top winners of the 15th Susan Smith Blackburn Award, given annually to women writers. "Moe's Lucky Seven," a 14-character play that explores the relationship between Eve and the Serpent and was commissioned by Costa Mesa's South Coast Repertory, brought Meyer the $5,000 first prize.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1990 | RAY LOYND
"There must have been something in the muffins," said playwright Jane Anderson. "Five of us--an all-girl production team--met in (Pasadena Playhouse artistic director) Susan Dietz' house to discuss ideas for an original play. We ate muffins and I listened to the passions of the other women. Then I went home and wrote. That's how 'Baby Dance' was born."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2010 | By David Ng
Tackling themes such as rape, an office shooting and kinky sex, the Geffen Playhouse's new season isn't for the faint of heart or the easily offended. The Geffen said Monday that its 2010-11 season will feature new plays by Jane Anderson and Neil LaBute, plus local premieres of work by Lynn Nottage and Tracy Letts. In addition, Hershey Felder will return with another of his signature stage biographies of a great composer. In all, there will be five plays on the Geffen's main stage, the same number of productions announced for the current season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2007 | By Jane Anderson, Special to The Times
AS I write this, I'm well into the third week of rehearsals for my new play at the Geffen Playhouse, "The Quality of Life. " As the playwright, I would have ducked out by now to let the director and the actors work out the nuts and bolts of interpreting the play. Maybe I'd get the occasional phone call from the director wondering if they could possibly add or cut a line. But mostly I would rightfully be asked to disappear so everyone could mess around with the text in peace without having me hunched in the back of the rehearsal room wringing my hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2004
Television awards: The Directors Guild of America nominees for the best made-for-TV movies, airing in 2003: Jane Anderson (HBO's "Normal"), Jeff Bleckner (ABC's "Meredith Willson's 'The Music Man' "), Rod Holcomb (FX's "The Pentagon Papers"), Richard Loncraine (HBO's "My House in Umbria"), and Mike Nichols (HBO's "Angels in America.")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
For anyone old enough to remember it, the 1986 explosion of the space shuttle Challenger remains vividly entrenched in the mind. As with the JFK assassination and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, we remember exactly what we were doing when we heard the news -- these are the moments in which dreams die. The Challenger disaster was a body blow to our faith in the invincibility of science.
NEWS
March 16, 2003 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Emmy Award-winning writer-director Jane Anderson tackled the cutthroat competition of teenager cheerleaders in "The Positively True Adventures of the Alleged Texas Cheerleader-Murdering Mom" and the pain and joy of adoption in "The Baby Dance." In her newest film, "Normal," which premieres Sunday on HBO, she focuses on marriage and love "I wanted to throw the biggest challenge I possibly could at the marriage," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
The saleslady is acutely uncomfortable as she rings up purchases -- dresses, a wig, earrings -- for tall, broad-shouldered Roy. He's been getting this reaction a lot lately. On his pickup truck, parked outside, someone has written "You are not normal" in the Illinois farm soil that coats one of its doors. Roy -- the central character in "Normal," being shown on HBO Sunday night at 10 -- is evidence that the world is much more complicated than some people would like it to be.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2003 | Daryl H. Miller, Times Staff Writer
The saleslady is acutely uncomfortable as she rings up purchases -- dresses, a wig, earrings -- for tall, broad-shouldered Roy. He's been getting this reaction a lot lately. On his pickup truck, parked outside, someone has written "You are not normal" in the Illinois farm soil that coats one of its doors. Roy -- the central character in "Normal," being shown on HBO Sunday night at 10 -- is evidence that the world is much more complicated than some people would like it to be.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Philip Brandes, Special to The Times
For anyone old enough to remember it, the 1986 explosion of the space shuttle Challenger remains vividly entrenched in the mind. As with the JFK assassination and the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, we remember exactly what we were doing when we heard the news -- these are the moments in which dreams die. The Challenger disaster was a body blow to our faith in the invincibility of science.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Crossing from one gender to another is such a dramatic journey that it's surprising there haven't been more plays on the subject. Jane Anderson's "Looking for Normal," getting its world premiere at the Geffen Playhouse, manages the task of covering one such journey with a light touch, yet without making fun of the protagonist or anyone else. It also offers a compassionate and convincing case that human ties can transcend gender.
NEWS
September 23, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes frequently about theater for The Times
"In my generation," says 39-year-old playwright-screenwriter Jane Anderson, "to be honest, to do the decent thing, is considered a heroic act." Sitting in the courtyard patio of her Hollywood Hills home and framed by a window with a panoramic view of the smoggy Los Angeles Basin, Anderson is genuinely puzzled by this cultural devaluation of goodness. Yet she argues--primarily through a growing body of plays and films--that characters animated by the good deed can be dramatically powerful.
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