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Jane Bloom

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
"For me, the process of change and development is grasping a part of what it means to be a musician and improviser in 1989," soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom said by phone from her New York City apartment. "Being an improviser encompasses embracing what are the important influences of your times and reflecting and reacting to it. I suppose the live electronics are part of my statement about what it means to be improvising today." Bloom, who is appearing with her trio tonight and Thursday at the Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood, first attracted widespread attention as an improviser and composer in jazz circles with her 1983 album "Mighty Lights."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jane Ira Bloom relishes taking risks, walking a new aural path, looking for that as-yet-unplayed phrase. The soprano saxophonist says that's where the real payoff in music is. "I'm one of those people who likes being on the edge, that feeling of not knowing which way the music is going to go," said Bloom from the New York home she shares with her husband, actor Joe Grifasi. "You can reach enormous musical heights when you give in to that kind of spontaneity."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic.
More than any other musician of his generation, Miles Davis epitomized change. He ushered in one revolution after another: from hard bop to the magisterial collaborations with Gil Evans' orchestra . . . from chordal to modal music . . . and on to electronic jazz fusion. Davis--who died Sept. 28 in Santa Monica of complications of pneumonia, liver disease and stroke--continued to surprise us right up until the end.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER, Leonard Feather is The Times' jazz critic.
More than any other musician of his generation, Miles Davis epitomized change. He ushered in one revolution after another: from hard bop to the magisterial collaborations with Gil Evans' orchestra . . . from chordal to modal music . . . and on to electronic jazz fusion. Davis--who died Sept. 28 in Santa Monica of complications of pneumonia, liver disease and stroke--continued to surprise us right up until the end.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The past week has been a hectic one for Ann Patterson. She has been checking on the music that will be needed for two important dates--Monday at the Biltmore Hotel's Grand Ave. Bar, and Sept. 22 at the annual jazz festival in Sedona, Ariz.--and phoning the 16 other artists needed for rehearsal and performances. Patterson is not a singer; not a dancer, pianist or comedian.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jane Ira Bloom relishes taking risks, walking a new aural path, looking for that as-yet-unplayed phrase. The soprano saxophonist says that's where the real payoff in music is. "I'm one of those people who likes being on the edge, that feeling of not knowing which way the music is going to go," said Bloom from the New York home she shares with her husband, actor Joe Grifasi. "You can reach enormous musical heights when you give in to that kind of spontaneity."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
**** CLEO LAINE "Jazz" RCA Laine's credentials as a jazz singer have been debated, but there is no question about the value of the company she keeps here--and no disagreement over the way the highly regarded musicians help steer her in the right direction. Toots Thielemans on harmonica and Gerry Mulligan on baritone sax are heard in vocal versions of their own tunes "Bluesette" and "Walking Shoes." Clark Terry revives Ellingtonian memories with "Just a Sittin' and a-Rockin'."
NEWS
May 11, 1990 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accusing the Bush Administration of a "Reagan-esque" retreat from aggressive control of toxic wastes, environmental groups and waste treatment specialists went to court Thursday in an effort to block the government from implementing new disposal regulations. A lawsuit seeking to set aside 30 pages of regulations backed by nearly 900 pages of supporting documents was filed in the U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 1989 | LEONARD FEATHER
Jane Ira Bloom, the soprano saxophonist who came to town this week for a three-day spell at Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood (she closes tonight), has moved beyond the tentative modernisms of her earliest recordings, more than a decade ago, into an adventurous realm of spirited sounds on the brink of the avant-garde. Appropriately, one of the most experimental works in her first show Tuesday was a movement from the suite of compositions she was commissioned to write for NASA after watching the Discovery launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
The past week has been a hectic one for Ann Patterson. She has been checking on the music that will be needed for two important dates--Monday at the Biltmore Hotel's Grand Ave. Bar, and Sept. 22 at the annual jazz festival in Sedona, Ariz.--and phoning the 16 other artists needed for rehearsal and performances. Patterson is not a singer; not a dancer, pianist or comedian.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
"For me, the process of change and development is grasping a part of what it means to be a musician and improviser in 1989," soprano saxophonist Jane Ira Bloom said by phone from her New York City apartment. "Being an improviser encompasses embracing what are the important influences of your times and reflecting and reacting to it. I suppose the live electronics are part of my statement about what it means to be improvising today." Bloom, who is appearing with her trio tonight and Thursday at the Catalina Bar and Grill in Hollywood, first attracted widespread attention as an improviser and composer in jazz circles with her 1983 album "Mighty Lights."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER
Yet another aspect of Branford Marsalis' protean talents can be observed this evening (at 7 and midnight) when Bravo cable presents "Reed Royalty," the first half of a two-part special about jazz history. "Reed Royalty" begins and ends with Marsalis wandering around an 18th-Century New Orleans mansion, blowing a lonesome soprano sax. In between, the hour consists of an eloquent lecture, amply illustrated by vintage clips.
NEWS
August 23, 2001
Today Food--5 p.m.: Join Lauren Groveman and get her latest thinking on foods that she believes refresh your soul and body. http://chat.msn.com/laurengroveman.msnw Friday Alternative Rock--Noon: Don Gilmore produces Eve 6, a Los Angeles trio that had a hit with "Inside Out" on its first album. This Webcast was recorded March 3 at House of Blues Chicago. http://www.hob.com/live/events Saturday Classical--All Day: Pianist Anne-Marie McDermott will present Bach's English Suite No.
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