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Jane Getz

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The baby grand piano takes up nearly the entire bandstand in the downstairs lounge at Chadney's Restaurant, the chummy jazz venue across the street from NBC Studios. That's where you can find keyboard player Jane Getz most Tuesday nights, as a regular member of drummer Earl Palmer's trio. This particular night, Getz is working through a thoughtful rendition of "Body and Soul" as Palmer, whose drum kit sits next to the bandstand, accompanies with graceful brushwork.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While numerous jazz artists have made forays into the worlds of pop and rock, few have landed a major record deal as pianist Jane Getz did. In the early '70s, she signed with RCA Victor and made two albums of pop tunes under the name Mother Hen, a nom de plume given to her by noted songwriter Gene McDaniels ("A Hundred Pounds of Clay"). Getz also recorded with John Lennon and Don Henley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2000 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While numerous jazz artists have made forays into the worlds of pop and rock, few have landed a major record deal as pianist Jane Getz did. In the early '70s, she signed with RCA Victor and made two albums of pop tunes under the name Mother Hen, a nom de plume given to her by noted songwriter Gene McDaniels ("A Hundred Pounds of Clay"). Getz also recorded with John Lennon and Don Henley.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The baby grand piano takes up nearly the entire bandstand in the downstairs lounge at Chadney's Restaurant, the chummy jazz venue across the street from NBC Studios. That's where you can find keyboardist Jane Getz most Tuesday nights as a regular member of drummer Earl Palmer's trio. This particular night, Getz is working through a thoughtful rendition of "Body and Soul," as Palmer, whose drum kit sits next to the bandstand, accompanies with graceful brushwork.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The baby grand piano takes up nearly the entire bandstand in the downstairs lounge at Chadney's Restaurant, the chummy jazz venue across the street from NBC Studios. That's where you can find keyboardist Jane Getz most Tuesday nights as a regular member of drummer Earl Palmer's trio. This particular night, Getz is working through a thoughtful rendition of "Body and Soul," as Palmer, whose drum kit sits next to the bandstand, accompanies with graceful brushwork.
TRAVEL
July 25, 1999
Regarding "Water Taxi! Water Taxi!" (Weekend Escape, July 4): Author Diana Marcum makes a statement that has me wondering if she really went to Ventura and spent a night at the Bella Maggiore Inn: "There wasn't any readily discernible night life," she wrote. In fact, one of Southern California's best and oldest jazz clubs (since 1987) can be found across the street from the Bella Maggiore: the 66 California, which has hosted groups led by the likes of Henry Franklin, Teddy Edwards, Jane Getz and Buddy Collette.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1996 | Bill Kohlhasse and Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
They're not necessarily easy to find. But these small-label albums from Southern California-based jazz musicians can be every bit as rewarding as the well-publicized releases from Verve, Blue Note or the other major labels. These recordings have shared characteristics that mirror, in mood and tempo, the tenor of our contemporary California culture, belying the once accepted "cool-school" cliche of West Coast jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Music and medicine have had a long and fascinating association. From the belief in the healing powers of music that has been historically present in many world cultures to the present day physicians' orchestras, the linkage has been strikingly persistent. Dr. Richard Allen Williams is a personification of that linkage. A professor of medicine at UCLA and editor of the pioneering "Textbook of Black-Related Diseases," he also has been a jazz trumpeter for most of his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1995 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite the inclusion of a few well-known outsiders and styles ranging from bop to reggae, the opening day of the Jazz at Drew festival had a definite West Coast flavor. Los Angeles-based performers, many with international reputations, predominated in the fifth annual fund-raiser for the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science held Saturday on the grounds of the King-Drew Medical Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The baby grand piano takes up nearly the entire bandstand in the downstairs lounge at Chadney's Restaurant, the chummy jazz venue across the street from NBC Studios. That's where you can find keyboard player Jane Getz most Tuesday nights, as a regular member of drummer Earl Palmer's trio. This particular night, Getz is working through a thoughtful rendition of "Body and Soul" as Palmer, whose drum kit sits next to the bandstand, accompanies with graceful brushwork.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1999 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The unexpected--that's just what you'll get in a performance by exuberant timbales player Bobby Matos, one of Los Angeles' most acclaimed Latin jazz artists. "We take chances," said New York native Matos of his long-standing band. "We expand the parameters of Afro-Cuban jazz, trying to change it all the time, looking for something spontaneous, trying to stretch. There's a heavy respect for tradition, but we're always updating and pushing that tradition." Matos plays tonight (and Aug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1999 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saxophonist Jeff Clayton spent most of Saturday at his small Los Angeles studio, teaching everyone from preteen beginners to college students to senior citizens. "Teaching is my way of giving back," says the 45-year-old Clayton. He helps lead the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra, the official jazz arm of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the Clayton Brothers jazz quintet. He shares duties with his bass-playing brother, John, and drummer Jeff Hamilton.
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