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Jane Goodall

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NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Jane Goodall was clearly out of her element recently when she walked the red carpet for the premiere of a new film. After all, the conservationist has spent much of the last 50 years in the wilds of Africa studying primates. But this was no mere movie, and the title alone explains why it brought Goodall, 78, to a red carpet in Orlando, Fla. Disneynature's "Chimpanzee" opens in theaters Friday, giving the world a breathtaking glimpse into the lives of a family of chimps in the Tai Forest National Park in Africa's Ivory Coast.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Usually, Stephen Colbert asserts his dominance over his guests. It's how he's become a late night superstar and has landed at the top of many viewers' wish lists to replace David Letterman on CBS. But Tuesday night, it was famed primatolgist Jane Goodall who showed Colbert how to behave. "If I were a chimp that you were meeting for the first time, would there be something different about your body language right now?" Colbert asked. Ever game, Goodall said she'd demonstrate and had Colbert stand up and assume an ape-like posture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Usually, Stephen Colbert asserts his dominance over his guests. It's how he's become a late night superstar and has landed at the top of many viewers' wish lists to replace David Letterman on CBS. But Tuesday night, it was famed primatolgist Jane Goodall who showed Colbert how to behave. "If I were a chimp that you were meeting for the first time, would there be something different about your body language right now?" Colbert asked. Ever game, Goodall said she'd demonstrate and had Colbert stand up and assume an ape-like posture.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
Primatologist Jane Goodall and publisher Grand Central have announced they will delay publication of Goodall's forthcoming tree-focused book "Seeds of Hope" in the wake of accusations that certain passages were plagiarized. The Washington Post noted the lack of attribution of certain passages last week. "Together with my publisher, I have decided to postpone the release of my new book, SEEDS OF HOPE, so that we may have the necessary time to correct any unintentional errors," Goodall said in a statement released Friday.
SCIENCE
May 29, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
Serfdom, war and dying for the tribe: It reads like a page out of a Russian novel. In fact, we're talking about ant life. Mark Moffett, an ecologist and a research associate at the Smithsonian Institution, has observed all of these behaviors in ants — and much more. Known for his detailed photographs of insects and other small creatures, the author of books about the rain forest canopy and frogs has now written "Adventures Among Ants: A Global Safari with a Cast of Trillions."
NATIONAL
April 23, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Primate expert and wildlife champion Jane Goodall "pant-hooted" like a chimpanzee at the State Department as she teamed up with U.S. Secretary of State Colin L. Powell to fight deforestation on Earth Day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
The Rose Parade is Pasadena's premier event, but its 2013 grand marshal admits she learned about it only after receiving her title. "When you grow up in England and spend all your time in Tanzania ... I hadn't heard of the Rose Parade," Jane Goodall said. "It was only gradually that I realized what a big honor it is. " Goodall is perhaps best known for setting up shop in 1960 in what is now Tanzania to conduct what would become groundbreaking research on wild chimpanzees. Now 78, she remains focused on issues involving conservation, crisscrossing the globe to visit schools and give lectures.
NEWS
July 18, 2009 | PATT MORRISON
Chimpanzees and humans share about 95% of their DNA. If affinity and awareness count, Jane Goodall may have a smidge more. As the world's most renowned primatologist, her work has changed what we think of our primate brethren as thinking and feeling creatures, toolmakers, peacemakers and warmongers. One of the original "Leakey Ladies," anointed by the paleoanthropologist Louis B. Leakey, Goodall still returns twice each year to the chimpanzees of Gombe, Tanzania. In a world of fleeting celebrity, she remains both famous and influential.
NEWS
September 17, 2000 | SUSAN VAUGHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At 16, Jane Goodall had her first--and last--experience with a career advisor. During a school career day, the visiting advisor learned that Goodall deeply wanted to work with animals. "And this career lady said, 'Oh, I have just the thing for her. She could take photos of people's pet dogs,' " Goodall recalled. Someone gently informed the advisor that Goodall planned to travel to Africa to study wildlife. The advisor balked.
BOOKS
December 28, 1986 | Bettyann Kevles, Kevles writes about science for The Times
In March of 1739, an anonymous pamphlet lamented the death of the "late incomparable Chimpanzee." One of the first apes to reach Europe alive, this chimp had spent five months in London eating at popular coffee houses and being addressed as "Madame." She was no mere animal to her contemporaries but rather an exotic human being who could not speak. By the mid-20th Century, the world was familiar with all three of the great apes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2013 | Laura J. Nelson and Christine Mai-Duc and Louis Sahagun
Rose Parade spectator Miriam Pazz was snapping photos of a float honoring military dogs when it came to an abrupt halt. A man bounded off the platform in combat boots and fatigues. It was her husband, who she thought was still in Afghanistan. The crowd leaped up in a standing ovation as 4-year-old Eric Pazz II dashed from the sidewalk and into the arms of his father, Army Sgt. 1st Class Eric Pazz, 32. Moments later, the family locked in an embrace seen by hundreds of millions of parade viewers around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2012 | By Kate Mather, Los Angeles Times
The Rose Parade is Pasadena's premier event, but its 2013 grand marshal admits she learned about it only after receiving her title. "When you grow up in England and spend all your time in Tanzania ... I hadn't heard of the Rose Parade," Jane Goodall said. "It was only gradually that I realized what a big honor it is. " Goodall is perhaps best known for setting up shop in 1960 in what is now Tanzania to conduct what would become groundbreaking research on wild chimpanzees. Now 78, she remains focused on issues involving conservation, crisscrossing the globe to visit schools and give lectures.
NATIONAL
April 17, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
Jane Goodall was clearly out of her element recently when she walked the red carpet for the premiere of a new film. After all, the conservationist has spent much of the last 50 years in the wilds of Africa studying primates. But this was no mere movie, and the title alone explains why it brought Goodall, 78, to a red carpet in Orlando, Fla. Disneynature's "Chimpanzee" opens in theaters Friday, giving the world a breathtaking glimpse into the lives of a family of chimps in the Tai Forest National Park in Africa's Ivory Coast.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Birding with Jane Goodall is a fantastic notion, but not an unrealistic one this spring. The naturalist best known for her longtime work among chimps in Africa will be on hand for a March trip to witness the migration of sandhill cranes at preserves and viewing areas in Kearney, Neb. The Jane Goodall Institute sponsors this four-day trip that features an evening of crane viewing plus cocktails and dinner with Goodall. Other activities include visiting the Rowe Sanctuary on the Platt River, birding and hiking in Rainwater Basin with natural history author Scott Weidensaul and naturalist Bill Wallauer and a nature photography workshop.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2010 | Los Angeles Times staff reports
Marshall Flaum, an award-winning producer, director and writer who specialized in documentaries, died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications after hip surgery, his family said. He was 85. Flaum won five Emmy Awards, had several more nominations and was twice nominated for an Academy Award, for the documentaries "The Yanks Are Coming (1963) and "Let My People Go: the Story of Israel" (1965). Flaum wrote, directed and produced both documentaries.
SCIENCE
May 29, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
Serfdom, war and dying for the tribe: It reads like a page out of a Russian novel. In fact, we're talking about ant life. Mark Moffett, an ecologist and a research associate at the Smithsonian Institution, has observed all of these behaviors in ants — and much more. Known for his detailed photographs of insects and other small creatures, the author of books about the rain forest canopy and frogs has now written "Adventures Among Ants: A Global Safari with a Cast of Trillions."
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's about 9,000 miles from the edge of Lake Tanganyika, where Jane Goodall set up camp 30 years ago to take an up-close-and-personal look at a community of chimpanzees. But the renowned scientist steps along as if she were hiking through the East African bush, those alert gray eyes dancing from one detail to another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
On her 70th birthday, famed chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall delivered a message of both despair and hope for the world's environment Saturday afternoon at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. "Only if each and every one of us rolls up our sleeves and does our best to make the world a better place" will things improve, Goodall told more than 1,000 people gathered on one of the Huntington's lawns.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2009 | Dan Neil
As Miss Teen South Carolina reminded us so memorably in 2007, "Some people in our nation don't have maps. . . ." So true. But you can't blame the National Geographic Society. For more than a century, the House That Grosvenor Built has been one of the world's most ambitious educational and scientific organizations. These are the people who brought us unforgettable documentary films about Jacques Cousteau and Robert Ballard, Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey. The society's flagship publication, National Geographic magazine, remains the platinum standard of glossy-book journalism: lucidly written, beautifully photographed and humanely informed, a study in elegance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Judith Lewis, Lewis writes about energy and environmental issues. She is a contributing editor to High Country News.
Hope for Animals and Their World How Endangered Species Are Being Rescued From the Brink Jane Goodall Grand Central: 378 pp., $27.99 Dawn Light Dancing With Cranes and Other Ways to Start the Day Diane Ackerman W.W. Norton: 240 pp., $23.95 The frogs are dying. From Canada to Panama, swamps have gone still and rivers silent; insects the amphibians would have devoured proliferate. Creatures with 100 million-year histories have begun disappearing so fast biologists can hardly keep pace.
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