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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
On her 70th birthday, famed chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall delivered a message of both despair and hope for the world's environment Saturday afternoon at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. "Only if each and every one of us rolls up our sleeves and does our best to make the world a better place" will things improve, Goodall told more than 1,000 people gathered on one of the Huntington's lawns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
On her 70th birthday, famed chimpanzee researcher Jane Goodall delivered a message of both despair and hope for the world's environment Saturday afternoon at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. "Only if each and every one of us rolls up our sleeves and does our best to make the world a better place" will things improve, Goodall told more than 1,000 people gathered on one of the Huntington's lawns.
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NEWS
December 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Around the world, shelters give refuge and sorely needed love and care to abused, neglected and abandoned youngsters. The Halfway House in Bujumbura does the same for chimpanzees. Jane Goodall, the renowned primate researcher, set up the center three years ago to rehabilitate chimps traumatized by mistreatment in captivity. During a recent visit, little Uruhara cried out for his friend and caretaker. Elie Nukurikiye scooped the 5-year-old chimp into his arms and growled throatily.
NEWS
December 4, 1994 | From Associated Press
Around the world, shelters give refuge and sorely needed love and care to abused, neglected and abandoned youngsters. The Halfway House in Bujumbura does the same for chimpanzees. Jane Goodall, the renowned primate researcher, set up the center three years ago to rehabilitate chimps traumatized by mistreatment in captivity. During a recent visit, little Uruhara cried out for his friend and caretaker. Elie Nukurikiye scooped the 5-year-old chimp into his arms and growled throatily.
NEWS
October 12, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Birding with Jane Goodall is a fantastic notion, but not an unrealistic one this spring. The naturalist best known for her longtime work among chimps in Africa will be on hand for a March trip to witness the migration of sandhill cranes at preserves and viewing areas in Kearney, Neb. The Jane Goodall Institute sponsors this four-day trip that features an evening of crane viewing plus cocktails and dinner with Goodall. Other activities include visiting the Rowe Sanctuary on the Platt River, birding and hiking in Rainwater Basin with natural history author Scott Weidensaul and naturalist Bill Wallauer and a nature photography workshop.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2001
"An Evening With Jane Goodall," with an appearance by the acclaimed primatologist, and dinner and entertainment, will launch a music outreach program to benefit the Endowment Fund of the Jane Goodall Institute, tonight at 6:30 at Every Picture Tells a Story, 7525 Beverly Blvd., in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1997
The 1997 Tyler Prizes for Environmental Achievement will go to primatologists Jane Goodall, Birute Galdikas and George Schaller. Goodall, director of the Jane Goodall Institute, was honored for her pioneering studies on chimpanzees, while Galdikas, president of the Orangutan Foundation International, was cited for her seminal studies on orangutans. Schaller, of Wildlife Conservation International, is known for his field studies of gorillas, tigers, lions, snow leopards and pandas.
NEWS
March 1, 1997
Peter Stewart, 41, a muralist who highlighted Southern California communities with his bold images of endangered animals, rain forests and Vietnam veterans. A veteran, Stewart in 1995 directed a dozen homeless veterans in painting a 26,000-square-foot mural on an underpass for the Veterans Administration Medical Center in West Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
ANAHEIM -- Baby food is no longer just mushy, creamy, bland stuff in little jars. That couldn't be more apparent at the Natural Products Expo. Manufacturers are now promoting baby food enhanced with probiotics, vitamins and minerals and "hidden" vegetables. One maker of premier, healthy baby foods -- Happy Baby -- has grown from being in five stores three years ago to 5,000 today. Gerber, that old standby, has a line of certified-organic products such as organic brown rice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1992 | ARTHUR H. ROTSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In its first year, operators of the Biosphere 2 experiment admitted fudging on promises of a sealed, self-sustaining environment where eight people would grow their food and recycle air, water and wastes. But the billionaire backer of Biosphere 2 remains optimistic about the scientific, commercial and educational potential of the $150-million project in the desert north of Tucson. Edward Perry Bass, the reclusive financier from Ft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2004 | Lynne Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Monarch butterflies usually spend the winter in the shadows, but a group of Ventura youths is aiming to bring the city's annual visitors into the spotlight Saturday with a festival at Camino Real Park. This year, close to 1,000 of the orange-and-black beauties are at the park, said Johnji Stone, an interpretive program supervisor with the city of Ventura, and another expert estimates that there may be as many as 2,000 monarchs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jane Goodall, the internationally known researcher in chimpanzee behavior who devotes much of her time to educating youths around the world about environmental matters, was in her element Monday. Behind her, dozens of playful apes climbed and swung inside a revamped Los Angeles Zoo chimpanzee penthouse. Before her, about 75 elementary school students cheered the 64-year-old English ethologist with the energy more commonly reserved for a rock star.
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