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Jane Henney

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NEWS
May 20, 1998 | Associated Press
President Clinton has tentatively chosen a New Mexico cancer specialist to become the first female chief of the Food and Drug Administration, officials said Tuesday. Dr. Jane Henney, vice president of the University of New Mexico's Health Sciences Center, is undergoing routine background checks. Administration officials said Clinton hopes to announce her nomination within weeks. Henney, 51, was a close deputy to former FDA Commissioner David A.
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NEWS
January 20, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commissioner Jane E. Henney of the Food and Drug Administration, under whose stewardship the controversial abortion pill RU-486 was approved, has been told by the Bush administration that she will not be retained. Henney had submitted her resignation along with those of other political appointees, though she had reportedly expressed a desire to remain in the job. She was told late Thursday that her resignation would be accepted and to leave her office by the close of business Friday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998
That she was one of David Kessler's closest deputies should be an asset to Dr. Jane Henney when her nomination to succeed him as Food and Drug Administration commissioner goes to the Senate. That Henney's association with Kessler may instead hurt her speaks to the super-partisan atmosphere in the Capitol and some confusion about the FDA's real mission.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | Associated Press
The Senate on Wednesday confirmed New Mexico cancer specialist Dr. Jane Henney as the first female commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. Henney succeeds Dr. David Kessler, who clashed with some Republicans over his aggressive efforts to stem underage smoking. Kessler left last year to become dean of the Yale University Medical School.
NEWS
October 22, 1998 | Associated Press
The Senate on Wednesday confirmed New Mexico cancer specialist Dr. Jane Henney as the first female commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration. Henney succeeds Dr. David Kessler, who clashed with some Republicans over his aggressive efforts to stem underage smoking. Kessler left last year to become dean of the Yale University Medical School.
NEWS
January 20, 2001 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commissioner Jane E. Henney of the Food and Drug Administration, under whose stewardship the controversial abortion pill RU-486 was approved, has been told by the Bush administration that she will not be retained. Henney had submitted her resignation along with those of other political appointees, though she had reportedly expressed a desire to remain in the job. She was told late Thursday that her resignation would be accepted and to leave her office by the close of business Friday.
NEWS
September 20, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration proposed warning labels on antibiotics to remind doctors that over-prescription and inappropriate use encourage the development of resistant bacteria. "Antibiotic resistance is a serious and growing public health concern in the United States and the world," FDA Commissioner Jane Henney said in a statement. The proposed label would say antibacterial drugs should only be used in situations in which a bacterial infection is either proved or strongly suspected.
NEWS
December 13, 2000 | From Reuters
Faster reviews of new medicines bring quicker benefits to patients but also may lead to more drugs being pulled from the market, the head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Tuesday. FDA Commissioner Jane Henney said U.S. approval time for novel medicines has shrunk from an average of about 30 months eight years ago to about 12 months today. Urgently needed treatments come to market in about six months, she said.
NEWS
October 1, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The Food and Drug Administration will start a nationwide campaign today that will urge women to make sure they and their families take medications properly. As many as half of all Americans do not take their medications as directed, FDA Commissioner Jane E. Henney said. Mistakes can cause serious side effects that lead to doctor visits, hospital admissions and prescriptions that could have been avoided.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1999 | From Associated Press
Foods touted for their additions of new ingredients to boost their healthfulness are filling supermarket shelves, like the split-pea soup with the herb St. John's wort to "give your mood a natural lift," or the carrot cake with heart-healthy fiber. But such foods are drawing the ire of some consumer advocates who say a bowl of soup does not treat depression and fiber cannot counter the cake's fat to make it healthful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1998
That she was one of David Kessler's closest deputies should be an asset to Dr. Jane Henney when her nomination to succeed him as Food and Drug Administration commissioner goes to the Senate. That Henney's association with Kessler may instead hurt her speaks to the super-partisan atmosphere in the Capitol and some confusion about the FDA's real mission.
NEWS
May 20, 1998 | Associated Press
President Clinton has tentatively chosen a New Mexico cancer specialist to become the first female chief of the Food and Drug Administration, officials said Tuesday. Dr. Jane Henney, vice president of the University of New Mexico's Health Sciences Center, is undergoing routine background checks. Administration officials said Clinton hopes to announce her nomination within weeks. Henney, 51, was a close deputy to former FDA Commissioner David A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2000
Re "The Rise and Fall of the Killer Drug Rezulin," June 4: The response of FDA officials regarding what they learned from this disaster falls far short. They talk about labeling and warnings but there are some other lessons they should have learned. 1. FDA officials should free themselves from the influence of the drug companies. Your article points out that Warner-Lambert had undue influence on many of the high officials in the FDA. 2. The FDA surely should be more concerned about people's health than with currying favor with Warner-Lambert.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | From Associated Press
Prompted by the death of a teenager in a medical trial last year, federal health officials are investigating whether lush financial rewards earned by some researchers may affect patient safety and public health.
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