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Jane Jacobs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1997
It was such a satisfaction to read Steve Proffitt's interview with Jane Jacobs (Opinion, Oct. 12). I've studied her books in architecture school, and have found her insights and views on urbanism and architecture very realistic and sensible. In fact, she has made an impact on how I view the whole architecture and urban planning profession. If only all architects and city planners would think like she does--L.A. would truly be a much better place to live in. ETHEL G. RUBIO Los Angeles
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Book Critic
Leo Hollis should have had me at the title. His book "Cities Are Good for You: The Genius of the Metropolis" seeks to articulate something I take as an article of faith: Cities are the only place to live. And yet, even the title highlights some of the problems with this uneven inquiry into urban life. It might have been radical to champion the city 30 years ago, when crime rates were high and the middle-class exodus to the suburbs remained in full swing. We live, however, in a different era, when cities all over the world (including Los Angeles)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Jane Jacobs, an urban theorist and community activist whose books argued for the rehabilitation of neighborhoods on traditional lines, breaking with emerging trends in city development, died Tuesday. She was 89. An American-born citizen of Canada, Jacobs died at a hospital in Toronto of natural causes, according to publicist Sally Marvin of Random House, Jacobs' publisher. Jacobs was admitted to the hospital late last week and had been in failing health for several years.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2006
RE "Bearing Her Brand," by Chris Lee, Aug. 18: You know, just because the same hooker stands on the same corner each day as you drive by on your way to work doesn't mean she rates a big article about her on the front page of the Calendar section. The oversaturation of Paris Hilton in the media is like an alley covered in graffiti: We've seen it, we got it, we don't need a "reputable" source bringing it to us also. JEFF SOFTLEY Los Angeles SHE offers no inkling of giving to a charitable organization or any concern over a political issue -- in fact she names everything Paris and does not appear in public unless it is to further the sale of her items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001
Having studied Jane Jacobs in college and graduate school, I was thrilled to see her ideas get attention in "In New Urban Villages, City Living Becomes Trendy" (Nov. 19). Every vibrant urban community that I can think of has the mixed-use elements discussed in Jacobs' "The Death and Life of Great American Cities" in 1961. It is a great misfortune that it has taken 40 years for Jacobs' theories to take root in Southern California. Had this been otherwise, we likely would not have the many bland suburban communities and the traffic congestion that plague Southern California today.
BOOKS
May 30, 1993 | ALEX RAKSIN
SYSTEMS OF SURVIVAL: A Dialogue on the Moral Foundations of Commerce and Politics by Jane Jacobs (Random House: $22; 236 pp.). Jane Jacobs--a writer whose books on the anthropology and economy of cities have become classics--embraces a semi-fictional device in these pages in order to popularize her latest set of singular theories. Much as Owen Barfield did in "Worlds Apart," she creates a group of characters who meet in a fine old apartment building in Manhattan's Gramercy Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Book Critic
Leo Hollis should have had me at the title. His book "Cities Are Good for You: The Genius of the Metropolis" seeks to articulate something I take as an article of faith: Cities are the only place to live. And yet, even the title highlights some of the problems with this uneven inquiry into urban life. It might have been radical to champion the city 30 years ago, when crime rates were high and the middle-class exodus to the suburbs remained in full swing. We live, however, in a different era, when cities all over the world (including Los Angeles)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2006
RE "Bearing Her Brand," by Chris Lee, Aug. 18: You know, just because the same hooker stands on the same corner each day as you drive by on your way to work doesn't mean she rates a big article about her on the front page of the Calendar section. The oversaturation of Paris Hilton in the media is like an alley covered in graffiti: We've seen it, we got it, we don't need a "reputable" source bringing it to us also. JEFF SOFTLEY Los Angeles SHE offers no inkling of giving to a charitable organization or any concern over a political issue -- in fact she names everything Paris and does not appear in public unless it is to further the sale of her items.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
Two scenes from the life of Jane Jacobs, who died this week at age 89: The first takes place in the early 1960s. New York City's urban-renewal czar, Robert Moses, rises to speak at a community meeting in Greenwich Village about his plan to run a new six-lane expressway through the neighborhood. Jacobs, who has already pilloried Moses in her landmark 1961 book "The Death and Life of Great American Cities," and who lives nearby, sits in the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
Mary Jane Jacob has been named chief curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art. Jacob comes to MOCA from the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, where she served as chief curator for six years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2006 | Christopher Hawthorne, Times Staff Writer
Two scenes from the life of Jane Jacobs, who died this week at age 89: The first takes place in the early 1960s. New York City's urban-renewal czar, Robert Moses, rises to speak at a community meeting in Greenwich Village about his plan to run a new six-lane expressway through the neighborhood. Jacobs, who has already pilloried Moses in her landmark 1961 book "The Death and Life of Great American Cities," and who lives nearby, sits in the audience.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2006 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Jane Jacobs, an urban theorist and community activist whose books argued for the rehabilitation of neighborhoods on traditional lines, breaking with emerging trends in city development, died Tuesday. She was 89. An American-born citizen of Canada, Jacobs died at a hospital in Toronto of natural causes, according to publicist Sally Marvin of Random House, Jacobs' publisher. Jacobs was admitted to the hospital late last week and had been in failing health for several years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 2001
Having studied Jane Jacobs in college and graduate school, I was thrilled to see her ideas get attention in "In New Urban Villages, City Living Becomes Trendy" (Nov. 19). Every vibrant urban community that I can think of has the mixed-use elements discussed in Jacobs' "The Death and Life of Great American Cities" in 1961. It is a great misfortune that it has taken 40 years for Jacobs' theories to take root in Southern California. Had this been otherwise, we likely would not have the many bland suburban communities and the traffic congestion that plague Southern California today.
BOOKS
March 26, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
THE LEGACY OF LUNA; The Story of a Tree, a Woman, and the Struggle to Save the Redwoods By Julia Butterfly Hill; HarperSanFrancisco: 256 pp., $25 Spring 1997 comes to the redwoods. Julia Butterfly Hill has survived the first of two winters on a platform 18 stories up during her tree sit to save Luna, a lone redwood owned by Pacific Lumber and blue-marked for cutting. "I awoke to nature's morning breath, sweet as honey," she writes, "and watched the sun rise."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1997
It was such a satisfaction to read Steve Proffitt's interview with Jane Jacobs (Opinion, Oct. 12). I've studied her books in architecture school, and have found her insights and views on urbanism and architecture very realistic and sensible. In fact, she has made an impact on how I view the whole architecture and urban planning profession. If only all architects and city planners would think like she does--L.A. would truly be a much better place to live in. ETHEL G. RUBIO Los Angeles
BOOKS
February 25, 1996 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
A SCHOOLTEACHER IN OLD ALASKA edited by Jane Jacobs. (Random House: $19.95; 302 pp.) This is the kind of book you stay awake worrying won't get published anymore. (Just a night thought.) "To be openly proper and conventional yet also openly daring is a way of being that was seldom available to women in the past. Some who did pull off this trick without being either aristocratic or rich were Americans on the frontier. Hannah Breece was one of these women. . . .
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