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Jane Juska

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June 10, 2006 | Heller McAlpin, Special to The Times
IN late 1999, Jane Juska, a retired, long-divorced schoolteacher living alone in a rented cottage in Berkeley, placed a personal ad in the New York Review of Books that has since become famous: "Before I turn 67 -- next March," the ad ran, "I would like to have a lot of sex with a man I like. If you want to talk first, Trollope works for me." The California woman received more than 63 responses to her ad, and had affairs with men ranging in age from 32 to 72.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2006 | Heller McAlpin, Special to The Times
IN late 1999, Jane Juska, a retired, long-divorced schoolteacher living alone in a rented cottage in Berkeley, placed a personal ad in the New York Review of Books that has since become famous: "Before I turn 67 -- next March," the ad ran, "I would like to have a lot of sex with a man I like. If you want to talk first, Trollope works for me." The California woman received more than 63 responses to her ad, and had affairs with men ranging in age from 32 to 72.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2003 | Suzanne Mantell, Special to The Times
Growing old has a way of sneaking up on people, of leaving them behind as vital participants in life's passages. But Jane Juska, an astute observer of life's changes, wasn't going to let that happen to her. Juska, a former high school English teacher, felt tripped up by the aging process. Though retired, her juices were still flowing and, more important, she felt like a young person trapped in an aged body.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2003 | Suzanne Mantell, Special to The Times
Growing old has a way of sneaking up on people, of leaving them behind as vital participants in life's passages. But Jane Juska, an astute observer of life's changes, wasn't going to let that happen to her. Juska, a former high school English teacher, felt tripped up by the aging process. Though retired, her juices were still flowing and, more important, she felt like a young person trapped in an aged body.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2006 | Anne-Marie O'Connor, Times Staff Writer
IN an age when Viagra has revolutionized the sex lives of older men, who would have thought anyone would take issue with Gail Sheehy's contention, in her new book, "Sex and the Seasoned Woman," that aging women want lively sex lives too? After all, didn't women of a certain age grow up in the same swinging '60s and '70s? Don't baby boomers believe they invented modern sex? And who are all the millions of Viagra-fueled seventy-something men supposed to have sex with -- women in their 20s?
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